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Honda S2000

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  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,159
    My opinion X 3,996 then... :) J/K

    Come on everyone, put your votes in! :D
  • dbustodbusto Posts: 2
    does anyone know about this treatment? since auto car washes are no good, i've been thinking about getting it for my S2000. Any feedback? Thanks.
  • although i do not have an s2000 i know of a simple little trick you can do in this situation (this works with any diff but torsen and open diffs benefit more from this technique) in a situation where you're stuck with one or more tyres with no traction (in the air, on slick ice) and the power is all being directed to that wheel, just lightly apply the brakes so that there's something that tyre has to "fight" against to rotate, this "fools" the diffs into thinking that tyre has grip and redirects power to those wheels which actually have grip allowing you to free urself from wherever you're stuck from

    this wont work if all your wheels are stuck or if the wheels which arnt stuck have barely any traction at all (like in winter through 5 inches of snow)

    and to clarify a torsen differential uses worm gears which can vary the amount of torque between each output side, the gear ratios used will determine the maximum torque split for example a system that can split up the torque to a maximum ratio of 1:10 means the one side can recieve 10 times the torque of the other side, but if one side has no traction at all, and thus cannot put any torque down, neither will the opposing side

    an open differential is always 1:1, meaning both sides recieve the same amount of torque, clutch based LSDs have self locking capabilities and WOULD be able to put power down even when an axle has no grip whatsoever, this is because the clutches within the differential litteraly lock up both output axles

    given the choice i will still take the s2000 style torsen diff because it requires very little maintenence while clutch type LSDs need to be overhauled if you exploit them too much
  • I would not! The current S2000 is pretty close to perfect. A bigger engine would make it heavier and impact the handling for only a modest performance gain.

    MidCow
    2006 S2000
  • Here's a question for you Honda S2000 enthusiasts.

    Would you pay $47,000 +/- for a Honda S3000? Specs would be: [SNIP]


    Sorry, but the S2000 is almost perfect as-is and I think you'd lose the flavor of the car with your proposed mods. I paid only $30,000 for a new 2006 S2000 this Spring and when the end of the line REALLY arrives, I'll probably buy another and put it in storage. It's the kind of car that defines the word "classic". Besides the Porsche 911 and Ford GT40, I know of no other current production cars that I'd consider worthy of putting away for my own future use.

    What I would pay extra for (another $5000 or so) is the S2XXX:

    - Upgraded clutch worthy of what is probably the best shifter seen in ANY current production car.
    - Further reinforcing of engine block to allow the return of that 9000 RPM redline.

    In the meantime I'll remain content, knowing I'm driving a vehicle that gives me 95% of the driving thrills of Porsche's best vehicles at around 1/4 the cost, yet is reliable, gets good fuel economy, has a surprisingly roomy trunk and is driven by some of the smartest, best looking people in the world ;) ...
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    mdinightcowboy and clonedtodeath:

    Thanks for your replies. It is hard to argue that the current S2000 isn't flirting with perfection - at least at the performance levels and price point it is at. I did prefer my 9,000 rpm 2.0 liter 2002 model to the current 2.2 liter version, but not by much.

    It looks like the S3000 won't become my pet project. Not if I have to buy 4,995 of the 5,000 limited production run myself, anyway. But I do think the S3000 could be done in a way to keep the positives of the S2000, but elevating performance to the level approaching the former Ferrari 360. At which time, I'd probably be asking, Honda S4000 anyone?

    Enjoy your S2000's. :)
  • As much as I love my Hondas, if the S3000 approached $50K, I would definitely throw in the extra bucks and get the incomparable Boxster S.
    Part of the magic of my '06 S2000 is that I drive it around thinking about how much smarter (and better looking) I am paying $399/mo for amazing performance, than all the poseurs driving their expensive German sport cars paying out their noses for the marque.
  • Does anyone know which the air intake is enclosed in a box then baffled so that air only comes in a top oval opening.

    It seems like it would be very easy to increase the air flow by removing the baffle or opening up the baffle box all together.

    Any comments? /Opinions?

    Thanks,

    MidCow
  • Hi everyone I have basically made up my mind that I want to lease a 2006 S2000 in a couple of months but have a few questions for some of you more experienced fellows out there.

    First of all, I am 22 and have been driving for 5 years. The only car I have owned is a 1993 mazda mx3. I don't know much about cars nor do I have much experience with driving a car that is as intense and serious as the s2000. However, I am willing to learn. The question is; is the s2000 a good place to start? This may be an odd question because it seems that most of you who have already driven or own this car are experienced enthusiasts. I know what I want; I want a fast, powerful car that is insanely fun to drive and involves skill on the drivers part to utilize the cars potential power. I don't care about the storage capacity, how many people it can seat, or the "dated" (which its not, I think it looks awesome) interior. I just want a fun, driver oriented car. I plan on leasing one for 3-4 years. I only recently developed a passion for cars and plan on using the s2000 to "break me in." Plus I'm going to take an auto mechanics/technology class at my college this coming winter to learn a thing or two about cars (as of now, I am very ignorant). So the bottom line: is the s2000 a good choice for a performance driving neophyte such as myself? Any tips on how I can get acquainted with the car and become a competant driver capable of unleashing the cars potential? Thanks for your time, I appreciate any feedback.
  • Any car can be fun to explore and drive 'at the limit', but it sounds like you are in the right ballpark for your goals. I strongly suggest you join a local car club for your model that hosts auto-cross events. It's the only safe way for you to test the limits of your car and yourself.

    Have fun.
  • "I am 22 and have been driving for 5 years" ==> Yes, Perfect - As long as you do not live in NJ, you will get a decent rate on insurance.
    As to planning to break yourself in, you will find that you will not want to part with it ever, unlesss of course, you decide to move on for an Elise or a Boxster-S or upward.
    You really don't need to study automobile engineering to realize that this is arguably one of the best cars ever built, after some five hours of seat time ;-)
    As to aquainting yourself - Just take your time and stay mature in the process of orienting yourself with the S. It could be a whiner on torque and it will take some work to get it upto highway speeds unless you are VTEC-ing it everytime. You will initially have those kids with souped up civics with BMW grilles beating you up at the stop lights and giving you dumb grins - They all grin because they have won the lottery of their lives and they can't beleive their luck :confuse: ...
    Little do they realize that all you have to do is - At the sight of green light, just push it upto 30 MPH on first gear, shift hard and fast into second, VTEC it again and stay there below the redline until you hit 55, shift to 3rd, stay on VTEC and you have them two lights behind with their jaws on their knees. :P It sure feels good but, after a couple of those mistreatments of my baby, I grew tired of it. ( I mean, for who and for what, and most importantly, WITH what???)
    When you are at the point where you realize that each drive is an experience like no other - Consider yourself fully aquainted with the S. If you are not already comfortable doing your heel-toe downshifts, practice them now as this car is best enjoyed in the twisties where you find yourself wanting to dive faster AND faster into and out of curves and that the car dares you to go even faster!!
    One last thing: Final words from that uncle character to SpiderMan- II always go thru' my mind when I really start to enjoy my ride on open highways :) , buzzing past the rest of the traffic at 98 MPH with the wind howling like banshees havin' a banquet: "With great power, comes even greater responsibility."
    It is so easy to forget how powerful you are with this car so, If I were you, I would always remember that.
    Welcome to S2K nation!!!
    Cheers!!
    --njexpress.
  • This would be my first sports car. I have lots of questions, but I will submit just a couple for now. I live in Phoenix (no snow) and the cost of a S2000 will be on the outer limits of affordability for me. My question is whether it is realistic to think I can use the S2000 as my primary vehicle — for commuting to work, etc? How many S2000 owners use it as a primary vehicle? I would be trading in my 2004 Honda EX 5-speed with 37K miles on it. Keeping affordability in mind, would it be better to trade for an '06 or an '07? I am also considering leasing, but the discussions on the S2000 maintaining its value after the model is discontinued have me thinking that owning might be the better way to go. What about lease options with the option to own after the term. Any input for someone who is looking to buy his first s2000 will be appreciated. Thanks!
  • I've had my S2000 for about six months now, and it is my only vehicle. It works just fine for me, but you definitely should analyze your lifestyle to make certain that you can deal with the limitations.

    Of course, the lack of cargo space could be a problem if you regularly need to haul large packages, but the trunk certainly will hold a full supply of groceries, a weekend suitcase, or two or three small-medium sized boxes. There's room for you and one passenger, of course, so you should also think about that.

    The ride quality is really comfortable considering it's a sports car. It never crashes over bumps or bottoms out, so in terms of ride, it makes for a fine commuter car. The car is noisy, so long drives (more than 3 hours) could be uncomfortable. In most circumstances, however, it is no problem. I actually like the noise. It maintains the "raw" feel that I like.

    If you're concerned about affordability, I'd go for the 2006. From what I understand, there are no significant upgrades from 06 to 07. As far as lease options, I really don't know much about that. I prefer traditional financing. That way, I can drive as much as I want without worrying about mileage charges.

    One additional thing to think about is operating costs. It has good fuel economy (23-26 mpg), but it uses premium gas. The car also eats tires much more rapidly than the typical car. Expect to have to change at least your rears every 10-15K miles. Your insurance costs will also go up since it is a sports car.

    Overall, it is a fantastic car, and I love it. Puts a smile on my face every time I drive it. It's a purchase you definitely will not regret. Just be sure you go into it aware of the limitations and ready to make the necessary compromises.
  • The 2006 or newer with the VSA is execellent. No changes scheduled for 2007 that I have heard of. The car would be pretty ideal in Phoenix, except it will get too hot with the top down. I drve in Texas with the top down with A?C on high and it is conforatble at 90 degrees and below and bearable up to95. However, isn't Phoenix much hotter in the summer/

    I get a lot worse gas milage (around 20 , best tank 21, some highway and some city and lots of VTEC) and mybe it is becuase I put on Indvidia exhaust which is much louder than stock. Also good investment Rick's Voodoo shift knob $35 screws down lower by 1/2 inch than stock. worst accesory is cargo net; absolutley worthless. drink cup holder is pretty bad too but hey who needs to drink and drive a sports car. My insurance cost went up bu not bad lessthan $1000 a year for very high level of coverage; but I am old and have other cars.

    Excellent car!

    MidCow
  • vinnynyvinnyny Posts: 780
    If you're going to drive this car to/from work everyday in Phoenix traffic, you might want to think about it a little longer. The S2000 is a great car--once the engine starts spinning above 3000 rpm or so and when the temperature is less than 90. You'll hate it in stop and go traffic--especially with the top up. You will absolutely bake if you leave the top down during the day in June through September. I drove my Audi TT, C6 Corvette and BMW 330 convertibles in AZ with the top up except for EARLY morning and in the evening. If you buy it, get yourself lots of sunscreen and a big bottle of Motrin (to ease the pain from all the shifting you'll be doing).

    That said, you'll love taking the S2000 up through the twisties on your way up to Sedona (but pack light).
  • My work comute is on the freeway, where there is no stop and go. I expect to drive with the top up in the summer months in Phoenix, of course. Does the rag top provide enough insulation to allow for adequate cooling using the air conditioner? The small compartment should make cooling (and heating) easier, I would think.

    My decision to buy this car hinges primarily on the affordability question. Maintenance costs, such as tire wear mentioned previously, and gas costs, as well as the initial cost of the car are factors going into my decision. By the way, I can't understand why tires should wear faster than any other car, as long as you aren't "burning rubber" every time the light turns green.

    Perhaps when considering purchase of this type of car the old adage applies "If you have to ask, you can't afford it."
  • Newbie: Only one comment: the S2000 is a great car, but you have to treat it with respect and learn its characteristics. It has the power to easily break the rear end loose in a curve and you can switch ends in a hurry if you get on the gas too much. To consider buying: I live in Texas and find the AC works well - cools off interior reasonably quickly even in those few times I have parked outside in the sun for a long period of time. Tires will wear faster because they have a soft compound to increase their grip. You could get longer lasting, harder, replacement tires, but I would do so with great caution if you do any aggressive (fun) driving.
  • Ditto on the soft rubber... Also, the camber on many sports cars is set up aggressively to help with turn-in response, etc... This causes the tires to wear a little unevenly, and even wear more while you are driving straight down the freeway..

    It seems that maintenance costs are a significant factor for you... I think if the majority of your driving is going to be freeway commuting, and cost is a concern... then the S2000 is probably not the right car for you.. no matter how great it actually might be.

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • vinnynyvinnyny Posts: 780
    I can't honestly comment on the AC system because I chose the BMW over the S2000. However, you will probably notice the noise with the top up or down--it seemed thin to me when I test drove it. If you're really concerned about maintenance costs, why not consider a certified used Audi TT or BMW Z4? Both come with free maintenance and are fun cars.
  • jatjee said:
    " It has the power to easily break the rear end loose in a curve and you can switch ends in a hurry if you get on the gas too much. "

    Actually with VSA , 2006 and newer this is mno longer true.
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