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Ford Mustang (2005 and Newer)

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  • Thought I would throw this in as I took delivery of my 06' GT back in Sept. of 05'..when discussing "audio" options or ordering my true sports car, I told the salesman I really didn't really care about any kind of audio options.........being that I only really wanted to hear the "roar" of the V8 in the GT.......now THAT was music to my ears.

    Anyway..........received it with the std. audio and CD player and it sounds awesome......can still fit 2 sets of golf clubs in the trunk without the obnoxious "shaker boom box" (or whatever it is called) in the trunk....what was Ford thinking when they made that an option????...18-20 year olds buying these things............like they can afford it??...... wouldn't think this is needed in these types of beautiful machines anyway.

    Anyway, enjoy the GT and ALL the great things it has to offer........you WILL leave the work that you do and ABSOLUTELY forget what happened during the day....totally engrossed in the machine that you are driving....GUARENTEE
    Look for a "statement" in NEWSWEEK magazine about the Mustang GT as I talked to a reporter while there on vacation in the Southwest....

    Thanks.......

    Dave
  • lmmlmm Posts: 70
    Mercedes has been doing this for years. I was quite surprised to see this on the coupe.

    "My guess is that things such as the windows which move down when the door opens, then cinch up as it closes will be problematic"
  • I own a 2001 V8 Mustang and I have been in love since the day I bought it. Lately I have been itching to buy her a companion and the 05-06 models are awesome. I heard a rumor that Ford would release a Bullitt in 08 if so, hell yea I am going to wait!!! But as with most rumors I have found no other confirmation than one line in a Stang mag. Any news?
  • m1miatam1miata Posts: 4,556
    Well, perhaps the next big change for the Stang is the concept car look. Some of the original styling of that concept car back in 2004, would spice things up a bit.

    Let's see last time gas got tight, there was the '74 Pinto Stang. :surprise:
    Sorry about that, must be a terrible flash back.

    Anyway, I do hope they change the front and rear lights area to be more like the models shown a few years back. That would be a cool evolution of this old, but handsome looking retro car. And please, a new interior with a rounded dash, gauges close together so they show between the steering wheel, and less hard plastic, if possible without breaking the bank.

    Loren
  • tmtgttmtgt Posts: 18
    I'm looking to upgrade my 05 GT with a set of axle-back mufflers. I like Bassani, but others seem pretty good, too. Does anyone have any input? I'm looking for good deep sound that doesn't sound cheap and too loud. Also, prices seem to vary. Is there that much of a difference in quality?---Thanks- Tom
  • I like Borla, fantastic sound and lifetime warranty; heard you actually loose horse power on Flowmaster. I like Magnaflow but I still think Borla is better. Bassani I have heard is good, don't know much about them.
  • tmtgttmtgt Posts: 18
    Thanks. I heard Borla is good, I just haven't heard the sound clip yet..I'll keep lookin...car's is still resting in the garage, waiting for spring.
  • I bought the SLP loudmouth axle back exhaust and OMG! car sounds tons better. at idle the stang is a little throatier but at WOT look out! The note is huge. SLP unit is basically a double walled 12" exhaust tip. no baffles. may be too loud for the faint of heart but i get kudos everywhere i go. good luck on your search.. oh and it was only 249.00 through rpmoutlet.com
  • lmmlmm Posts: 70
    Try the MRT axle back. They have it for either the V6 or GT. Some reports have shown an extra 10rwhp. It has convinced some not to go with duals for v6.
  • Had the rev limiter kick in for the first time today, It was around 6,300 - 6,400 rpm's Is this normal and what rpm has anyone else noticed their's kick in.
  • tmtgttmtgt Posts: 18
    It's happened to me when I wasn't watching the tac. It just loses power and for a second, and you think you blew the engine. Also, about 105 mph, (happened once, but this car is great at high speeds!) the car just lost power. I'm thinking of putting in a chip, not that I want to redline it, but I've heard about a noticable increase in performance and no regulators. I'm also upgrading the exhaust and the intake, so a chip would help.
  • The way the cops have been eyeing me, even when I'm not speeding, has made me invest in a good radar detector. :shades:
  • Well you know what they say, "power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely" this applies to the GT absolutely!
  • The Consumer Reports site (fee required) quotes researchers at Johns Hopkins as finding that the chips in ignition keys can be easily hacked, that passive security systems thus offer little protection. :(
  • Hey I just bought an '06 blue 4.0 liter! Traded in my 2005 Ford Five Hundred. It just felt like a generic old mans family sedan. What a difference! Awesome. I read the Mustang engine is built in Germany. Is this a good engine? I had a 3.0 Duratec in the 500. Pretty gutless. I can't find much info on the Mustang engine because there is no trade name on it. Thanks!
  • akirbyakirby Posts: 7,730
    Commonly known as the Cologne engine. It's been used (in it's present SOHC form) since 97 in the Explorer and just after that in the Ranger. Early problems with the cam chain were fixed and it's been bulletproof since then as far as I know.
  • mschmalmschmal Posts: 1,757
    Here is the link to the John Hopkins article.

    Its pretty appearent that the "easily hacked" is an gross overstatement. Thats like saying shooting 3 point baskets is easy just because guys in the NBA do it. Or that heart surgury is easy because lots of doctors do it.

    Here is the relevant quote:

    In 15 minutes time, the researchers found they were able to uncover the secret code which is encrypted in a RF device by linking 16 inexpensive microchips that they purchased for $200. Once they knew this code, they could input it into another gadget that would imitate the original RF device.

    The Johns Hopkins researchers were able to successfully use this method to hack into a SpeedPass token and make purchases with it. In addition, they uncovered the code in a 2005 Ford Escape. By then transmitting this code, they could use a normal ignition key to start the SUV, as opposed to normally needing a secure immobilizer key.

    Your key is what is transmitting the code and the range is very short.

    To steal your car, someone would have to capture the RF code transmitted by your key and they would have to get with in 3 to 5 feet to do it. Also this code once captured would only be good until that key is used again after which time the code for that key changes.

    Even with the code, they would still have to engage the ignition of the target car.

    Oh and it takes 15 mins just to get the code, not counting tiem for "hot wiring" the ignition once you have the code.

    Sounds like an awefull lot of trouble to steal a Ford Focus.

    Mark.
  • mschmal, Consumer Reports states that anyone with a lapton sitting next to you in a Starbucks can hack the codes of keys and passes you are carrying on your person.

    The researchers broke a code by bringing a hacking device, a simple laptop, into a car. They furnish a video of how its done --- it takes mere seconds. They insert a key without the radio chip into the ignition and wave an antenna hooked up to the laptop as they turn the key. Voila! The car starts. They give instructions on the internet on how to set up a laptop to break codes (see link below).

    A thief, who obviously is unlikely to have a copy of your key, only has to hotwire the ignition instead.

    The hacker has to break your code only once to steal your car. Thus the resetting of the code is of limited protection.

    Further the information you furnish about hacking being possible at only short distances, inches, is false. The hacker can eavesdrop at a range of "tens of feet" when you use your key.

    Hopkins researchers state that the codes in use are unacceptably short and should be lengthened.

    I think it's only a matter of time, a very short time, before car theives start using this technology to steal expensive cars. The return on their dollar, the investment they have to make vs the profit they can realize, is a huge inducement for them to adapt and overcome the new technology. If experience has taught us anything, it is that every cyber security system can and will be breached, especially one as primitive as the car ignition key codes.

    Do what you want, but I use a steering wheel lock device, this in addition to my active theft system.

    The Hopkins report can be found at:

    http://www.rfidanalysis.org/
  • mschmalmschmal Posts: 1,757
    Did we read the same report?

    Dude I don't think we have to worry about your average car thief carrying this out.

    IT would have to be a pretty well organized and calculated.

    Mark.
  • pony_piratepony_pirate Posts: 317
    mschmal, did you download the video which shows them starting a car without a chip, with just a laptop and chipless key? A few waves of the antenna paddle to read the code and that's it. It literally took them no longer than turning the ignition key. Link above in my last post.

    As far as car thieves being "organized and calculated" enough to pull this off, where do you live, Mayberry? Car theft is big business with highly organized and very calculating car theft rings in every major US metropolitan center. Your car or its parts can be in Brazil, or any other country in the world, within a week. It seems GT's are fetching $50k in Germany, $40k in Puerto Rico (see other thread).
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,851
    if your vehicle is in demand but too tough to steal, they may just stick a gun in your back to get it. :mad:
  • lmmlmm Posts: 70
    They can steal any car any time if they want it bad enough.

    they can always tow it away.

    not worth worrying about it.
  • pony_piratepony_pirate Posts: 317
    Agree, but might as well make it as difficult as possible for them, hence the bar on the steering wheel and active anti-theft, with flashing light on the dash. Anything that slows them down might discourage them. Thieves are looking for easy, quick targets, to minimze their chances of getting caught.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,851
    some car thieves are looking for opportunities. others are looking for specific vehicles.
  • pony_piratepony_pirate Posts: 317
    Well, in that case, why don't you just leave the doors unlocked and the key in the ignition? :shades:
  • lmmlmm Posts: 70
    the pros will get it no matter what you do.

    it's the guy looking for a joyride that the little things you do will discourage.
  • rorrrorr Posts: 3,630
    I wonder how easy it is to hack some of those new 'Keyless Ignition' systems where the 'key' (with transponder) never leaves your pocket and there is just a 'start' button on the dash.

    edit:

    hey! How did you guys get all that crap up in the title bar?
  • mschmalmschmal Posts: 1,757
    I remember reading in South Africa, car jacking was/is so bad that people are rigging up flame throwers that shoot from just under the doors and they ARE NOT illegel.

    Must be hell on your paint job though.

    I also think that its a good idea NOT to take your hot car to places like the mall etc where the theives are hanging out.

    It sucks trying to park the Mustang with the long doors.

    Mark.
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