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2005-2007 Toyota Avalon

1494495497499500717

Comments

  • riley3riley3 Twin Cities MNPosts: 27
    Are your low beams too low? I have an '05 Limited and am disappointed in the range of the HID headlights on low beam. The low beams are very bright but for a short distance with a rather sharp cutoff. I'm thinking of adjusting them up but am concerned about shining in oncoming drivers eyes. Have you had your dealer check yours for adjustment to specs? Did your adjustments help?
  • larryt22larryt22 Posts: 125
    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory?id=1341671

    The article says Toyota hasn't decided which of 5-6 models to manufacture at the Lafayette Indiana plant. Says they could make 100,000 vehicles per year. Maybe it makes sense to move all Avalon production there so Georgetown can concentrate on only Camrys?
  • I'm going to the dealer Friday to see if they are within specs. Will report back. I think my low beams are too low.
  • At 20 the car should probably in 2nd, but in 'S' it will still be in 4th until you punch it, at which point it will hesitate as it finds the correct gear on the downshift. Try it.

    Your may want to review your driving style, captain2. With drive-by-wire systems, avoid suddenly punching or pulsing the accelerator. Sort of the same idea as braking with ABS; you need to apply constant brake pressure--never pump the brakes. Instead, step on the gas moderately and hold it steady. This avoids confusing the control system with conflicting sensor information.

    I am one of those drivers who value the Avalon's capacity for zooming first off the gate and I enjoy leaving everyone else behind. But, if I am driving at 20 and need to speed up quickly, I don't punch it, I just step on the pedal with moderate constant pressure. The engine revs up quickly and smoothly, the transmission almost always finds the right gear and the car forges forward without any hesitation issues.

    If you are driving in 'S' 4 and your speed drops to 20, it should downshift on its own to a gear lower than 4 with modest gas pedal pressure. The engine RPM rarely drops below 1400 under load. If the RPM drop below that, it downshifts.

    I have compared driving in 'D' vs. 'S' (left alone in 4th or 5th gear) on the same roads, with steep hills and curves and some straighter, faster stretches, and I am convinced that the transmission is smoother and makes fewer mistakes when in 'S' than in 'D'. Just don't punch it.

    Try it!

    havalongavalon
  • I just took delivery of the '06 Avalon I ordered a month ago. I noticed the ride was a bit more "jumpy" than the one I test drove, so I checked the tire pressure when I got home. All four tires were between 54 and 56 PSI! Can Toyota afford tire gauges?

    Also, I immediately noticed the dreaded transmission flakiness. upshifts were more abrupt than I had remembered during my test drive and a couple of times the engine revved a bit between shifts. Overall, the tranny just wasn't as smooth as I had remembered. The car only had 1 mile on it when I picked it up, so I hope it's a break-in issue, and not something that will turn out to be seriously problematic.

    On the bright side, the car is absolutely beautiful. The dark red is a perfect color for me -- it's been a long time since I've owned a red car (a '67 Mustang) :)
  • algeealgee Posts: 77
    It did not change mine either. Between the engine noise, road noise,terrible Limited model seats,and transmission slip, I am ready to get rid of this car. Never another Toyota. I am going to tet drive the new Buick Lucerne
  • n0v8orn0v8or Posts: 169
    Headlight veertical aiming instructions from the repair manual . . . .

    NOTICE:
    The final turn of the aiming screw(s) should be made in the clockwise direction. If the screw(s) is(are) tightened excessively, loosen and then retighten them, so that the final turn of the screw(s) is in the clockwise direction.

    The headlight aim moves up when turning the aiming screw(s) clockwise, and moves down when turning the aiming screw(s) counterclockwise.

    On HID headlights, both screws should be turned the identical amount in the same direction.
  • captain2captain2 Posts: 3,971
    havalongavalon- this is the the whole point - sure if you are gradual on the accelerator you will experience little problems with transmission gear selection regardless of mode selector position - which is actually the way I and most folks drive most of the time - but the control systems should not require you to adapt to it! Driven many cars now that use this silly 'drive-by-wire', and have not been able to get them to do what our Avs do. There are infrequent situations that may require maximum acceleration from 20 mph or whatever - why should we have to wait for the car to make up 'its' mind?
  • nimiminimimi Posts: 249
    Good luck in your quest for the "perfect car." But beware, it does not exist; especially clothed in any label by GM! You are in line for a lot of frustration and disappointment if Toyotas don't live up to your expectations.
  • gwsgws Posts: 67
    'I don't punch it, I just step on the pedal with moderate constant pressure. The engine revs up quickly and smoothly, the transmission almost always finds the right gear and the car forges forward without any hesitation issues....Just don't punch it.'

    Accurate and excellent advice... coupled with some defensive driving habits, drive-by-wire works satisfactorily in my experience with both the Avalon and a Lexus GS400.
  • Good luck in your quest for the "perfect car." But beware, it does not exist; especially clothed in any label by GM! You are in line for a lot of frustration and disappointment if Toyotas don't live up to your expectations

    Several years ago, JD Powers rated the plants that built Toyotas the tops in North America. This year those plants weren't even on the map. GM - specifically Buick - now takes the distinction of top quality manufacturing.

    When we put our minds to it, American firms can meet or exceed the quality of products made anywhere in the world.
  • petlpetl Posts: 610
    In fact the 2005 Gold recipient is Oshawa's #2 plant (Ontatio Canada), silver went to Oshawa's #1 plant and bronze was awarded to Hamtramck MI. I agree, with your statement with the emphasis on "put our minds to it".

    The "perfect car" is very subjective. What meets my needs or perceived idea of what constitutes a problem may not be the same as someone elses. Some people are more forgiving than others (particularly if they've experienced major malfunctions in a previously owned vehicle). However, Toyota does seem to be on roll.
  • Just took delivery of my special order 2006 Touring. The dealership was awesome as usual (my third purchase from them). Sticker was $32,067 and when other dealers would only give a few hundred dollars off on the Touring, my purchase price was $28,900. The vehicle is light yrs ahead of the V6 Accord I traded both in design and quality. Everything appears solidly constructed and the vehicle is extremely quiet and the ride smooth. There are a few items where Toyota could have used higher quality materials but for the price this is an outstanding value. Now, if someone can tell me how to get the airbag indicator lights to go off I will be ecstatic. That orange glowing light (SIDE AIRBAG ON) is irritating. There is nothing in the manual but does anyone know a trick to make it go away?
  • gwsgws Posts: 67
    'That orange glowing light (SIDE AIRBAG ON) is irritating. There is nothing in the manual but does anyone know a trick to make it go away?'

    A tastefully small piece of electrician's black tape, perhaps?
  • gwsgws Posts: 67
    The reports of problems are not limited to Toyota, as shown by this excerpt from the American International Automobile Dealers website..

    http://www.aiada.org/article.asp?id=32627

    'The hesitation problems have been reported by owners of Lexus ES330 models made between 2002 and 2004 the Toyota Camry and Highlander and other Toyota and upscale Lexus brand models equipped with the same five-speed automatics .

    'A search of NHTSA records and interviews with Consumer Reports magazine also show owners of other car makes are suffering from the same hesitation problem, including BMW's 3 Series, Ford Explorers and Escapes, and Dodge Durango 4x4.

    'David Champion, senior director of Consumer Reports' Auto Test Center in Connecticut, said the magazine's testers have encountered the same problems in the Audi A6 2.7T, the Audi Allroad, the Mazda6 equipped with the V-6 engine, and the Volkswagen Jetta 1.8T.

    Spokespersons for those companies could not be reached for comment.

    'What makes the issue perplexing is that no two models of a given car brand may have the same problem. Some owners of the makes involved say they've noticed nothing, while others will say the problem is chronic. '

    For reference to Infiniti G35 and Chevrolet,see also...
    http://forums.autoweek.com/thread.jspa?forumID=16&threadID=22729&messageID=528443

  • 'What makes the issue perplexing is that no two models of a given car brand may have the same problem. Some owners of the makes involved say they've noticed nothing, while others will say the problem is chronic. '


    Exactly. And not only that: When driving the same car, one driver may notice nothing, while another driver may encounter occasional problems. Example: my wife drove the Avalon yesterday and told me that she was approaching a red light that turned green before a full stop, so she stepped on the gas and at that point heard a loud clunking noise before the car advanced. She was driving in 'D'. Hmmm... This never happened to me... and I she said she didn't 'punch' it, either...

    havalongavalon
  • Sure am glad my transmission performs without problems.
  • What is "drive-by-wire"?
  • n0v8orn0v8or Posts: 169
    See
    http://www.picotech.com/auto/applications/electronic_throttle_control.html
    for an explanation.
    In this article, however, the "advantages" are overstated and misleading. The "electronic" system is actually more complicated, has equal or more moving parts, and is more failure-prone, than a conventional throttle cable. The driving forces (pun intended) for this system are emissions and fuel economy, not simplicity.
  • wwestwwest Posts: 10,706
    Intangible connection between the gas pedal and the engine throttle, software.
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