Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





MINI Cooper Care & Maintenance

1235721

Comments

  • wongkidwongkid Posts: 23
    Perhaps a simpler question to ask than answer: did you check with Mini if a new Mini dealership might be opening in New Hampshire "soon"? With their success and BMW's $$$ (OK, they did lose a bundle on Rover), surprising they still have voids in their dealer network. I like the 1 series idea too, BUT, typical issues with first year of a "new" car model plus likely "more than list" pricing when they first come out due to high demand. So, it will be +++$ vs a Mini. Good luck.
  • wongkidwongkid Posts: 23
    Perhaps a simpler question to ask than answer: did you check with Mini if a new Mini dealership might be opening in New Hampshire "soon"? With their success and BMW's $$$ (OK, they did lose a bundle on Rover), surprising they still have voids in their dealer network. I like the 1 series idea too, BUT, typical issues with first year of a "new" car model plus likely "more than list" pricing when they first come out due to high demand. So, it will be +++$ vs a Mini. Good luck.
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    Perhaps a simpler question to ask than answer: did you check with Mini if a new Mini dealership might be opening in New Hampshire "soon"? With their success and BMW's $$$ (OK, they did lose a bundle on Rover), surprising they still have voids in their dealer network. I like the 1 series idea too, BUT, typical issues with first year of a "new" car model plus likely "more than list" pricing when they first come out due to high demand. So, it will be +++$ vs a Mini. Good luck.

    Hi, I'm 12,000 miles away from where used to live so it's not all that easy to call up a dealer. In fact it's tough to reach the US from here period. We don't have a landline where I live because they don't have enough service at the pole so after 18 months still no phone. We mainly use cell phones like everyone else. To make International calls we can drive downtown and call from a place that is open 24/7. But it's expensive and not very practical.
    You can't dial 800#'s either.
    The dealership does handle the various surrounding States at least according to their website.
    The 1 series is a viable option because it's got enough size (i think) it looks bigger than the Mini but it's so heavy almost the weight or a 3 series!
    200 lbs. less.
    But the engine has been out now for almost a year and the 1 series is mostly a hatch over here and elsewhere but no hope of getting a hatch. Top Gear did a segment on the 1 series and they picked a VW Golf R32 over it, or some type of VW Golf. They weren't big on the lack of rear seat legroom but Clarkson is a big guy and like 6'4" tall. So for him most cars are small. The extra $10K is a LOT of ca$h to pay out tho.
    We will check with Mini and email them and see if any dealers are being added. i think they have an email.
    Any model we get will end up being a 1st year model unless we buy a Honda Fit.
    So we know we will have that to contend with.
    thanks. :)
  • actualsizeactualsize Posts: 120
    We recently added a 2007 Mini Cooper S to the Edmunds Long-Term Road Test fleet. As usual, it'll be with us for a year.

    Even before the introductory article went "live", we suffered a nail puncture and slow leak in one of our Dunlop RFTs. The TPMS system did its job, so we never had the thing go fully flat, but problems with supply and high cost are described in this blog post.
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    Even before the introductory article went "live", we suffered a nail puncture and slow leak in one of our Dunlop RFTs. The TPMS system did its job, so we never had the thing go fully flat, but problems with supply and high cost are described in this blog post.

    I read the article when it first came out and was really impressed that the issue was addressed and not glossed over. I think that I would swap out the RFT's with GFT's (Go Flat Tires) and use a kit to pump up teh tire if it goes flat, although a donut spare would be ideal.
    The problem with RFT's is that if you get a flat at 2am on a Saturday night in the boonies, you are screwed. Also even worse if you have to wait 2-3 days to get a replacement. I'd probably just buy an additional rim and keep a tire on it at my house for an emergency. Of course it depends where you are at the time when it goes flat.
    I really want BMW to give the option of a spare and GFT's or RFT's instead of forcing a new car buyer to jump through hoops to buy tires that won't be problematic and the people who say well how many flats do you get anyway? Well it depends if there are new houses being built in your area as well as road construction and what is open past 10pm at night?

    I think it will be a great blog to see how teh new Mini does,since my wife likes the car but how do people who live far from a dealer get servicing and maintainance?
    Must be great if you have a dealer within 20 minutes but for me it would be 120 minutes if there is any traffic.
    Would that cause many people to not buy a Mini?
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    "The problem with RFT's is that if you get a flat at 2am on a Saturday night in the boonies, you are screwed.'

    But can you not drive for a period of time on a flat RFT, as long as you don't exceed a certain speed limit?
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    But can you not drive for a period of time on a flat RFT, as long as you don't exceed a certain speed limit?

    Yes I think it's something like 50 miles which depending on where you live might or might not get you home. Most of the places I would go at night do not have 24/7 service stations and AAA is a very long wait, providing you have a cell phone or can get to a pay phone. If you live in the City or have a lot of places open all night you are ok, but I've been to many places where you WILL get screwed if you get a flat in any kind of tire. The Mini is such a nice car and we'd really like to consider one more than we are and the price is right, but that one time you are stranded for all night on the side of the road will put you off to RFT's. Also after the tire goes so far it basically gives up the ghost from what I understand. So after so many miles you could end up on the rim.
    I'm thinking that mini should have left the room for the spare in there and offered it as an option but BMW isn't doing that anymore and the new BMW engines don't even have an oil dipstick so you have to rely on the computer!
    I need to figure out what my options really are if I am to buy a Mini but chances are with all I am hearing and the dealer being 2 hours away, it's probably not the right car for me. :sick:
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    "...the new BMW engines don't even have an oil dipstick..."

    Really?? Which models/engines are those?
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    "...the new BMW engines don't even have an oil dipstick..."

    Really?? Which models/engines are those?

    The new 335i for certain and I think even the 328i as well. It's been discussed quite a lot on the BMW forums. many people are not happy that the only way to check the oil is for the dealer to drain the oil and measure it! :surprise:
    For me that's a bit much. But it's a common topic. I think the Mini still has a dipstick and all that, but BMW is moving away from any type of maintainance you can do yourself. I mean no dipstick in a $30K+ car? :mad:
    That combined with RFT's is making me shy away from BMW and if they keep having problems it will eat into their sales. The new JD Powers 2007 survey results came out and BMW has really dropped.
    I'm just hoping I can find a way to make a Mini work for me in my situation but it's not looking good at the moment.
    :cry:
  • british_roverbritish_rover Posts: 8,476
    Many of the newest BMWs and Mercs don't have dip sticks anymore. I think anything redesigned within the last two years has lost its dipstick.
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    But when you think about it, in this age of electronic this, and electronic that, when we have cars that can park themselves for crying out loud, poking a stick in a hole to measure the oil level seems ironically primitive. And you have to meet certain conditions in order to get an accurate measurement. ie. the car has to be idle for a certain period, the car has to be sitting on level ground, etc. Just seems primitive. I don't see why all cars cannot have some sort of electronic readout gauge on the dash, similar to the gas gauge, that gives you a real-time readout of your oil level (does the LR3 have this already?). I think the move away from user-serviceable parts may have merits because I think only a small % of the driving public actually knows, or cares, enough to do proper maintenance themselves. So it could be argued that, overall, it may actually be more cost-effective to put the job in the hands of professionals.
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    But when you think about it, in this age of electronic this, and electronic that, when we have cars that can park themselves for crying out loud, poking a stick in a hole to measure the oil level seems ironically primitive. And you have to meet certain conditions in order to get an accurate measurement. ie. the car has to be idle for a certain period, the car has to be sitting on level ground, etc. Just seems primitive. I don't see why all

    It's hardly rocket science tho. You park on level ground and shut the car off and wait a few moments and then you pull the dipstick out, wipe it off, reinsert it and then pull it out and look at it. There is a line it will either be at, above or below it.
    Quite simple really.
    Far too many people rely on gadgets which can malfunction and when they do and it's a big repair the factory is going to try and weasel out of fixing it.
    I'm in favor of making all drivers being required to actually learn how to drive before they can get a license including them changing a tire, putting in their own fuel and checking their own oil and water level with no gadgets. Oh and checking tire pressure as well.
    Plus they would have to pass real driving tests in order to pass, not just a 3 point turn and parallel park. I'd also make learning a manual transmission a requirement.
    I know this could never happen but I would do it if it were possible. Too many young drivers have no clue how to drive a car they just use it as though they lived inside a giant speaker box. When they push it they stuff it into a tree.
    But to stay on topic The Mini doesn't do anything but have RFT's at this time so it's good. ;)
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    "It's hardly rocket science tho. You park on level ground and shut the car off and wait a few moments and then you pull the dipstick out, wipe it off, reinsert it and then pull it out and look at it. There is a line it will either be at, above or below it.
    Quite simple really.
    "

    True enough. But, let's say, hypothetically, you also have to go thru a similar procedure to see how much gas you have left in the tank, would you feel the same way? ;)
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    True enough. But, let's say, hypothetically, you also have to go thru a similar procedure to see how much gas you have left in the tank, would you feel the same way?

    Well for starters you use Gas up, Oil in general should not be used up. Yes a little bit burns up sometimes on some cars, but it's not a constantly refillable aspect of your car and If you fill up you car with too much ga$, then you will just pay more. If you put too much oil in your car you will damage the seals and gaskets and have real problems. So hypothetically it's not comparable.
    Oh and in case you want to hypothetically make it the differential fluid or the tranny fluid then. The rear diff has a plug, take it out and insert your finger. No oil, problem! overfill it and it will pour on the ground. The tranny fluid has a dipstick and probably always will, but is less likely to have problems than engine oil.
    So arguing for a completely computerized car it should be one that requires zero lubrication. Maybe sealed electric motors or something. although those would take a beating in the snowbelt.
    BMW has already had problems with oil issues and they are well documented in that forum.
    Mini has other issues but at least it still has all the bits that matter.
    Funny thing tho that no one rallys the new Mini and yet the original Mini was a real champ at Rally's. I wonder why that is?
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    "Funny thing tho that no one rallys the new Mini and yet the original Mini was a real champ at Rally's. I wonder why that is?"

    Because everyone is still rallying the old MINI? The new MINI doesn't offer a significant power advantage but is less visceral than the old MINI.
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    Because everyone is still rallying the old MINI? The new MINI doesn't offer a significant power advantage but is less visceral than the old MINI.

    Could be except parts are a nightmare to get and the old mini's are plagued by electrical gremlins. I even hear the original mini owners making mini jokes about their cars. They sure love them tho.
    I still wonder if the New Mini would be good to Rally tho?
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    "I still wonder if the New Mini would be good to Rally tho?"

    I would think so, since the New MINI hasn't really strayed too far from the old blueprint.
  • Maybe in a FWD rally class. Eaten alive in an open class.
  • stevecebustevecebu Posts: 493
    Maybe in a FWD rally class. Eaten alive in an open class.

    I spoke with the RallyX people and read up on the results, no one is using a Mini except for AutoX.
    Tons of Subaru's tho.
    They divide it into classes like FWD, RWD etc...
    So you aren't going to put up your FWD anything versus a tricked out EVO Rally car.
    The Mini just isn't rallied any more.
    That's ok tho. I was just curious.
    Thanks
  • british_roverbritish_rover Posts: 8,476
    Well open class monsters have so much power that they have to be AWD to handle it.

    The limiting factor in rally is traction but I think a MINI would do well in the old group 3 SCCA rally class. With the collapse of the SCCA rally though I don't know all the rules and regulations anymore.

    Keep in mind that Dodge dominated the old group 3 class with the FWD only SRT-4 Neons.

    I have thought about campaigning a stripped Cooper S with the quafie in the FWD rally class. Its gotta be a stripped model though to reduce weight a minimum and sealing up that enormous panoramic sunroof would be a PITA.
Sign In or Register to comment.