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Got a Quick, Technical Question?

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Comments

  • burdawgburdawg Posts: 1,522
    If it's working fine with no apparent problems check to see if the gas cap is sealing good. A leak in the vapor recovery system is a common cause of SES (service eng soon) or CES (check eng. soon) indication. Otherwise, you already got good advice from kiawah.
  • i have a 2000yr toyota echo. 1.3 liter, 4 cylinder, automatic and have lost the ignition key. i had a replacement key cut from the door lock barrel but the engine only turns over. it will not start.I am told there is a "chip" in the origonal key that is recognised by the computor board and without that the whole system will have to be replaced. (security system apparently)The cost is more than the value of the car. Can the system be bypassed so a "non chip" key can start the engine
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Take your owners card w/Vin number to a Toyota dealer, and have them cut a blank chip key which will fit your ignition correctly. They'll then program the computer to accept that chip key, and you'll be good to go.

    Call them for prices, they can tell you over the phone exactly how much the new key will cost, and the programming. I had extra spares made for my Toyo couple months ago.
  • autodrautodr Posts: 27
    I think AutoZoo can only read generic fault codes. It is probably on for a fault that is setting a fault code that is proprietary to the manufacturer. Don't let them clear codes or "rest" anything. There is a whole other word of diagnostic information stored in the PCM that reaches beyond that of just "codes". If they clear the PCM's memory, it may effect your ability to have the vehicle properly diagnosed and repaired the first time at a shop. By clearing codes, you are working against the technician.
  • 2003 Toyota Matrix boggs down(running fine then suddenly almost stops..then jumps to life again) It has 180.000 miles...I THINK it's the fuel pump trying to fail and have a used one from a car with 60,000 miles. I suspect the tank must be dropped to reach it..but is there anything else I need to be aware of when changing it? Does it sound like the fuel pump.?...or could injectors be the problem? Thanks for any help! ! It has an automatic trans and 1.8 litre engine(4 cyl)
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Fastfish,

    If you are going to go to all the trouble to drop the tank to replace the fuel pump, I would seriously consider putting in a new pump, rather than one from a vehicle with 60K miles on it.
  • bolivarbolivar Posts: 2,316
    Unless you are doing this yourself (where your time is worth nothing), I sure would not pay someone to installed a used, 60,000 mile fuel pump - buy a new one.
  • I have a 2004 Infiniti G35 with xenon headlights. The headlight covers have a film on the inside. Does the film need to be cleaned by a professional, or can I do it myself?
  • autodrautodr Posts: 27
    You already have a used pump in your car now that you suspect is faulty. If you install another used part and have the same issue... then what?
  • If it is just a yellow film a good rubbing compound will remove it. You can pick it up cheap at Walmart.
  • I'll probably get a new one if I do drop it. Does it sound like the fuel pump though? And what precautions to use when changing. I know to unhook the battery but do I need to depressurize the system or something?
  • autodrautodr Posts: 27
    It sounds like a lot of possible things. A fuel pump is among some of the possible suspects that come to mind when you say that it bogs. You really should have the vehicle checked out by a technician while it is doing it. You'll spend a lot more than any shop's diagnostic fees are by trying to guess at it. Guess correctly the first time and you stand a chance of saving... but guess wrong and you're throwing money down a hole.

    You don't need to disconnect the battery, just have the key off. As for de-pressurizing anything... well... its gonna de-pressurize it's self the second you pull a fuel line loose, you just don't want it to de-pressurize the fuel right into your eye ;)

    So, find a fuel line section that you can crack loose in a controlled manner to let it vent. You should put a new fuel filter on with a new pump, so a good place to loosen the line might be at the filter.
  • howdhowd Posts: 2
    how do you remove the battery from this car? not much room to get it out without removing the fender
  • euphoniumeuphonium Great Northwest, West of the Cascades.Posts: 3,324
    Dear Ted,

    I hope you can help me here. The other day I set off for work, leaving my
    husband in the house watching the TV as usual. I hadn't gone more than a
    mile down the road when my engine conked out and the car shuddered to
    a halt.

    I walked back home to get my husband's help. When I got home I couldn't
    believe my eyes. He was in the bedroom with a neighbor lady making mad
    passionate love to her. I am 63, my husband is 65 and we have been
    married for thirty eight years.

    When I confronted him, he tried to make out that he went into the back
    yard and heard a lady scream, had come to her rescue but found her
    unconscious. He'd carried the woman back to our house, laid her in bed,
    and began CPR.

    When she awoke she immediately began thanking him and kissing him and
    he was attempting to break free when I came back. But when I asked him
    why neither of them had any clothes on, he broke down and admitted that
    he'd been having an affair for the past six months.

    I told him to stop or I would leave him. He retired from his job eleven
    months ago and he says he has been feeling increasingly depressed and
    worthless.

    I love him very much, but ever since I gave him the ultimatum he has
    become increasingly distant. I don't feel I can get through to him
    anymore.

    Can you please help?

    Sincerely, Linda

    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    Dear Linda,

    A car stalling after being driven a short distance can be caused by a
    variety of faults. Start by checking that there is no debris in the fuel line.
    If it is clear, check the clips holding the vacuum lines onto the intake manifold
    for vacuum leaks. If none of these approaches solves the problem, it could be that the
    fuel pump itself is faulty, causing low delivery pressure to the fuel injectors.

    I hope this helps & Merry Christmas,

    Ted
  • 2000 Grand Caravan SE Sport
    V6 & 3.3L
    Auto
    95,000
    Problem: The front fan won't work most of the time. Also, the headlights warning "ding" won't work most of the time. Also, the intermintent wiper control doesn't work all of the time. I think it's a relay, but not for certain. I've had the alternator replace since this problem started. Anyone think it is a relay? Also, is there anyway to determine which relay without taking it to a dealer and paying (overpaying) to hook up the diagnostic computer? Thanks for any help?
  • Hi,
    I have a 2000 Altima, 4 cylinder, with 65K miles. Local mechanic says I need a new Oxygen sensor. How long can I go without making this repair.

    Thanks,
    -- Brian
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    The Oxygen sensor detects how well the fuel mixture is burning (by monitoring the exhaust gases), and it feeds that information back to the computer to adjust the fuel mixture on the intake. If the sensor is bad, then the computer doesn't know how to adjust the mixture. You will then use more gas than you need to, as well as potentially cause damage. An anology would be a house furnace thermostat. You set the thermostat to the temperature you want, and there is a little temperature sensor that detects when it is too cold, and if so it turns the furnace on for you using gas/oil/electricity to heat the room back up the the optimum temperature setting. When the sensor detects it gets too hot, it shuts the furnance off. Without the temperature sensor, who knows whether your furnace will have the temperature too hot, or too cold.

    If the mixture is running too lean, then the engine cylinder valves will burn. If the mixture is too rich, the catalytic converter will clog. Both of those jobs are multiple hundreds of dollars to repair.

    How long? unknown what the mixture ends up as, as well as how many miles you put on your vehicle under what operating conditions.
  • Thanks so much for the help and the explanation.
    -- Brian
  • Are impact wrench sockets and regular ratchet drive sockets interchangeable? My son has an impact wrench and I don't. Will his impact wrench sockets fit on my ratchet drives?
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Maybe....

    Each socket wall would be thicker and stronger, to withstand the impact action. They typically would be 1/2" drive (the size of the square at the end, the size of the ratchet handle, and the size of the extensions).

    A normal non-impact socket set would be typically 3/8" drive, smaller sets would be 1/4" drive, and larger heavy duty sockets would be 1/2" drive.

    If you have a 3/8" socket set and he brings over his 1/2" sockets, you are out of luck.
  • Thanks for the answers. We both have 3/8 and 1/2" ratchet drives, but he also has a 1/2" impact wrench. I'm thinking of buying him a set of specialty sockets (larger than the standard 1-1/8" sockets) but would like top be able to borrow them from time to time and use them with my 1/2" drive ratchet.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Look into a set of 3/4" drive sockets (w/rachet, breaker bar, and extension). The set I have goes up to a 2" socket.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,615
    You can use his impact wrench sockets but he SHOULD NOT use your regular sockets on his air wrench. No, no, no no. They'll definitely break, I'll guarantee it, and if he's holding one as it spins, it's going to get ugly very quickly.

    Been there, done that.

    MODERATOR

  • amb82amb82 Posts: 3
    My mercedes has been dying on me while I'm driving, I pull over and start it back up and it will run fine. There has not been any warning or weird sounds before it happens and the check engine light has not come on once. Does anyone know what might be causing this?
  • bolivarbolivar Posts: 2,316
    Unless you both work mainly on American autos, and older ones at that, you should consider metric sockets for any future purchases. Even older American cars carry a lot of metric bolts. Anything newer than 10 years will have lots and lots of metric.
  • the clutch on the compressor failed and i am trying to by pass this with a smaller serpentine belt. is this possible and what size belt should i use.
  • imidazol97imidazol97 Crossroads of America: I70 & I75Posts: 18,091
    When shopping belts for a 3800 motor, I came across this site on Goodyear for their cheaper, standard serpentine belt. It lists by lengths. Probably regular auto parts stores have the same listing. Having the right belt in stock might not happen, but it could be ordered to get the right length.

    Goodyear belts by length

    Have you looked to see if the path works to just leave out the compressor? No interference? You might check a book to see if the no compressor option was available for your year and motor; there might be a belt length listed already at the parts stores. Otherwise try using a cord around the pulleys and moving the tensioner to its proper place in its travel to measure.
  • I have done this a couple of times. The best thing to do is to get a semstress's tape for measuring your waist and wrapping it around the pulley's after you take off the compressor. Adjust the alternator or idol pulley to it's smallest point measure it and add a half inch. This will be the length of the belt you need. Then go to the site suggested and get your part number for the belt. Good luck with it.
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