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Mazda3 Maintenance & Repair

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Comments

  • Does anyone know if the factory gear oil used in the 2009 Five Speed Manual Transmissions is Synthetic or Conventional?
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Don't know for sure, but my bet is probably not.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,874
    I agree with Shipo. The Mazda service manual specifies a 75W-90 GL-5 oil for the five-speed tranny. Any good synthetic such as Mobil 1 will work fine. Note that the six-speed found in the MS3 takes a 75W-90 GL-4 oil, and for that application I recommend Ford Full Synthetic Manual Transmission Fluid.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • sandman46sandman46 Posts: 1,798
    Had the oil changed and the tires rotated early this morning and mechanic said everything is fine with the car...boy was I shocked! Usually try to sell some service that isn't called for in the manual. Since I had a free oil change due me, cost me "$0" so I'm a happy camper. I've stretched out the changes to between 5k and 6k which I think is perfectly fine and he also concurred with this schedule.

    The Sandman :)
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,874
    I've stretched out the changes to between 5k and 6k which I think is perfectly fine and he also concurred with this schedule.


    Sounds good to me as well.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    I just did my first oil change on my 2009 Mazda3 at 7,504 miles. Don't see any reason to change it more often then that.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • dclurkerdclurker Posts: 57
    Does Mazda still call for oil changes at 7500 mile intervals? If so, I wonder if they would void your warranty because you were 4 miles over. ;-)
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Yup, they still call for 7,500 mile oil changes. ;)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Yup, they still call for 7,500 mile oil changes.

    I assume that is still only in the case where one meets the vague qualifications for "schedule 1"?
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    I'm not at all sure what's vague about it; my manual says:

    Follow Schedule 1 if the vehicle is operated mainly where none of the following conditions apply.
    - Repeated short-distance driving
    - Driving in dusty conditions
    - Driving with extended use of brakes
    - Driving in areas where salt or other corrosive materials are used
    - Driving on rough or muddy roads
    - Extended periods of idling or low-speed operation
    - Driving for long periods in cold temperatures or extremely humid climates
    - Driving in extremely hot conditions
    - Driving in mountainous conditions continually

    The only two that might even remotely apply to how I operate my car are the ones regarding cold temperatures and salt. In my case, yes, there is some salt used in our area, however, sand is the preferred substance dropped on icy roads. As for the cold temperatures, I interpret that to mean moderate trip lengths in cold weather. Given that my typical trip (currently done between 10 and 14 times per week) is 40 miles in length (and almost always on Cruise Control with virtually zero stop and go), the oil has more than enough of a chance to get up to operating temperature, even when the OAT is well below zero Fahrenheit.

    So, I am of the opinion that Schedule 1 firmly applies to how I operate my Mazda3. That said, just to be on the safe side, I've kept a sample of the oil and as soon as I find the Blackstone Labs sample bottles I have stashed somewhere in our house, I'll send it in for analysis.

    FWIW, I am a synthetic oil bigot, and when the factory oil came out, Mobil 1 0W-30 went in, and that should mean that regardless of the driving conditions, 7,500 mile OCIs are very conservative. Used oil analysis will ultimately prove that out as well. ;)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,874

    FWIW, I am a synthetic oil bigot, and when the factory oil came out, Mobil 1 0W-30 went in, and that should mean that regardless of the driving conditions, 7,500 mile OCIs are very conservative. Used oil analysis will ultimately prove that out as well.


    Blackstone thinks I could easily run a 7,500 mile OCI in my MS3, but since my dealer offers free 5,000 mile oil changes(I do have to supply the M1 :( ) I go ahead and run a 5,000 mile OCI.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Thanks my friend, that's good to know. ;)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    You actually think that is clear...wow! Almost nothing is clear there.

    What is "short distance", "cold", "hot", humid"?

    "Salt" is clear, but what is not clear is why that would mean one should change oil more frequently :confuse: .

    According to your profile are in NH, that = cold in my book, which means schedule 2 definitely applies, IMO. So it must not be clear, since I come to the opposite conclusion from the same set of facts.

    What is clear, to me, is that there is almost no where that it is clear that Mazda's schedule 1 applies.

    Ford, which uses the same engines, is much clearer. The normal schedule applies unless you are operating in one of the following conditions:

    Towing a trailer or using a camper or car-top carrier
    Extensive idling and/or low-speed driving for long distances as in heavy commercial use such as delivery, taxi, patrol car or livery
    Operating in dusty conditions such as unpaved or dusty roads
    Off-road operation
    Use of E85 50% of the time or greater (flex fuel vehicles only)
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    New Hampshire, cold? Where? ;-)

    The only time "cold" really affects anything is when you're starting and stopping an engine without ever really warming it up. As evidence of this, I turn to a study regarding oil temperatures of light aircraft that routinely flew on a year-round basis with the same oil. It was found that there was only about a ten degree temperature swing from the oil when a plane was flying in warm weather to the oil in that same engine when the plane was at 10,000 feet while flying over Minnesota on a sub-zero day in January.

    What all of this says to me is that the only thing "cold weather" really means is that in the winter months, you need to drive your car further each time you drive it to make sure the oil gets hot enough to make sure the oil boils off any water that has condensed into it.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Right I understand that, but that is not what Mazda lists as the criterion, they simply say "cold = sch 2"

    Just like we know that salt on the road has no imact on oil in the engine, yet Mazda says "salt = Sch 2".
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    They can list anything they want; there's no way they can refuse any engine related work (and make it stick) unless they can at the same time prove that it was an oil exhaustion related failure. In my case, all I need to do is to walk in with my UOA results showing that the oil was good to go for my driving habits and all of their arguments go out the window.

    FWIW, I don't do UOAs for that reason; however, it's nice to know that they can be used in case of a disagreement. :)

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,874
    Note that the 7/10/08 sample included three track days.

    image

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    In my case (with my mazda6), were there no warranty issue, I'd like to change oil (conventional) every 6 months or 5000 miles...which is (or was) Ford's normal schedule. To avoid any potential issues I have gone with Mazda's 4 month interval...which ends up being 3-4K miles for me.

    I figured $25-30 for one extra oil change per year was not a big deal. Plus I got my first 3 changes for free and I am now expecting to get another free one in exchange for my kid test driving a mazda3. Also every oil change gets me a free car wash, as long as it is not too cold at the time.

    BTW, when my car was new I had emailed Mazda about this issue, I sent them these questions:
    Can you please clarify some of the terms and conditions that are used to describe conditions under which maintenace schedule 2 applies?
    What is considered short-distance driving?
    Why does driving in areas where salt or other corrosive materials are being used mean that a shorter oil change interval is required?
    What specific temperature range qualifies as "cold"?

    Their answer was:
    Since our office is not technically trained, I can only stand behind what our owners manual states.

    Short distance driving is many city stops. Cold weather, daily temperatures under 40 degrees has an influence on types of lubricants used.

    If you have any further questions regarding maintinance or terms and conditions, I have listed a Mazda dealership which there service department can help assist you.
  • jeffyscottjeffyscott Posts: 3,855
    Another email exchange I had went like this:

    Me:
    Can you explain why there is such a big difference in maintenance schedules for the very same 2.3L engine depending on whether it is in the Mazda 6 or the Ford Fusion? According to Ford, my driving would be "normal" this would mean changing oil every 7500 miles. Even the Ford severe schedule is 6 months/5000 miles. Meanwhile with the Mazda6, I am told to follow schedule 2 which means a 4 month interval for oil changes.

    Mazda:
    I apologize for any confusion you have experienced. I cannot advise you on a Ford Schedule Maintenance Guide. However, I can advise that Mazda North American Operations strongly recommends following the guidelines presented to you in the Mazda6 owner's manual. These intervals were presented this way based on testing performed by Mazda engineers.
  • halserhalser Posts: 20
    I have a 2006 Mazda 3s. It has 42k with the 2.3 and a manual transmission.
    I use only Mobil 1 synthetic oil. You are quoting the manual for the service intervals. My manual only states using 5w-20. Is there a reason you are using
    5w-30? Will the oil have any trouble with the tight tolerances?

    Thanks, Halser
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Keep in mind that RoadBurner is running a MazdaSpeed3, and the Owner's Manual for that car recommends 5W-30.

    In my case I'm running 0W-30 in my 2009 Mazda3 i Touring (with the 2.0 liter engine) 5-Speed, and like your 2.3, the physical engine block, crank, pistons, heads and valve assemblies are identical to the ones sold in European Mazdas, and those engines call for 5W-30. For the U.S. market, the reason 5W-20 is recommended has nothing what-so-ever to do with tight tolerances and everything to do with getting the best fuel economy numbers.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,874
    The Aussie MPS(Mazdaspeed) say that their owners manuals list 5W-40 and higher viscosities as approved oils. Isn't CAFE wonderful? :sick:

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 1975 2002A 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5

  • drprdrpr Posts: 3
    2004 with 53K miles
    Power steering unit decided to function intermittently last year. Now it is completely dead. The dealer wants an arm and a leg and my first born child to replace it. Has anyone else been through the diagnosis and replacement of this unit? Any tips? Do you have to reset the computer after replacement? THANKS!
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Power steering unit decided to function intermittently last year. Now it is completely dead. The dealer wants an arm and a leg and my first born child to replace it.

    Have you checked the power steering fluid? Have you ever had it replaced? Do you see any leaks under the engine? Did the dealer quote a new unit or a replacement unit?

    I had to have mine replaced last year after I ran over a speed bump the wrong way and created a crack in the unit which slowly dripped out all the fluid. I had a replacement unit installed upon the dealer's recommendation at roughly 1/3 the cost of a new unit. Good luck!
  • drprdrpr Posts: 3
    Good questions all!

    No leaks, Good levels, Not replaced since I bought the vehicle a year and a half ago. The dealer didn't think replacement fluid would have any effect. They quoted me on a new unit and indicated that was the only option. I will have to recheck that. Was yours a rebuilt?

    Anyone out there replaced the unit themselves?

    Thanks!
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Was yours a rebuilt?
    Yes. If memory serves, the factory unit was approximately C$2000 and the rebuilt was C$800 (Canadian $ is currently worth about U$.80). In addtion to the unit, you will need to have new power steering fluid and a wheel alignment.
  • drprdrpr Posts: 3
    The one that went out is factory original. I will be putting in a rebuilt. I figured on the fluid. Has anyone done the work themselves? I am looking for any tips along the way.
    Thanks.
  • sonnyrockersonnyrocker Posts: 127
    You might have a transmission problem there.
  • joem5joem5 Posts: 201
    Well, I'll be driving back from Vail Co to Maine and Colorado winters are easier on you than back east.
    In Maine at camp it gets 20 to 30 below so that the inside hinges on you're camp door frost up.In CO the the Rockies block out alot of bad weather and you have ten straight days of sun and the trees give off heat.
    The only thing I know is the Mazda dealer told me to always use semi syn oil 5w 20. The air is thin here and I feel that my Mazda 3 I touring is lagging due to thin air, and the Dunlop tires I put on for the snow.Now, I use 5W 30 in the snow blower.
    Maybe ,I should be driving a car such as Roadburner has. A natural aspirated car struggles here. The base lodge is 8000 feet above sea level. Alot of people have GTI's, WRX's and Subie Turbo's
    and a million 4x4 pick up trucks .I haven't seen A Mazda Speed here. :confuse:
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Semi-Synthetic oil is simply oil that has a mixture of conventional Group II oil and synthetic (sort of) Group III oil. The Ford/Motorcraft 5W-20 is a good example of this kind of oil. Personally, I prefer fully synthetic oils as well as oils that flow better in the winter when cold, and yet are a bit thicker when hot, hence the fact that I use 0W-30 in my Mazda3 i Touring.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
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