Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Toyota Tundra New Owner Reports

1111214161762

Comments

  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    From reports..it was the Ford still struggling to get to 60 while the Tundra had stopped already.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    If the Tudras got 380 hp then there is no way it gets close to 20 mpg on the highway. I don't care if its got a 20 speed transmission. More likely 17/18 mpg on the highway.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    As a truck owner, there's way to much emphasis on towing capacity and horse power. You want the truck that feels the most like a car when you'll be driving it around everyday. In a earlier post I mentioned that I drove the new Silverado and it outshine the F-150 by a mile. I think for a full size truck, the Silverado feels and drives like a smaller vehicle. For some one who's going to be going back and forth to work everyday this is just as important as an extra 300 lbs towing capacity. Does the new Tundra feel like your driving a tank? That's the first thing I look at when test driving a truck, and all 1/2 tons are not created equal when it comes to driving dynamics.
    I drove past a Dodge Big Horn in my 1/2 ton Silverado today and felt like a midget. That truck would be absolutely miserable to drive everyday, and where the hell do you park it.
  • sortersorter Posts: 146
    381HP. Torque is also the highest.
    I think GM's 6.0 has more HP than 315.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    You are right. The ride and feel of the vehicle is probably the key feature for any final purchase unless the vehicle is specifically a work truck that's dedicated to either towing or carrying cargo. The new GMT900's seem to have top of the line interiors and driving/handling characteristics.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    That was my biggest complaint with the older gmt 800. It had such a big turning radius that it makes parking at the mall a serious task. Ever notice how almost all truck owners back in to a parking spot, thats because its so hard to get them back out in reverse.
    Toyota is in a little different situation then the domestic. If you need a Ford for serious hauling, you're better off to skip right over the babies and go with super duties. The domestics can put more emphasis on driving dynamics in their regular models, and leave the serious hauling to the heavy duties. Thats a luxury Toyota doesn't have.
    I'll give Toyota credit, for a first attempt at a real truck, Kudos. Wait until they freshen it up in two years and you'll see a lot more refinement on the inside. Toyota also needs a diesel to be considered a full time hauler, and IMO thats a big draw back to the Titan right now.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    With all the money Toyota is making, I'm surprised there willing to sacrifice brand quality to enter the large pickup market. Toyota brand is going to see their initial quality take a big hit adding a full size truck with different options. Nissan found out how much harder it is to build a full size truck, and their initial quality took a big hit.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    OTOH, while the current Tundra doesnt fill all the needs of the truck market the two area's it has always excelled in are driving dynamics and reliability. When it came out in 1999 it was the quietest most drivable truck in the market. IN the intervening 7 years it has always been given the top rank for quality and reliability.

    Some say Toyota 'failed' in offering a full sized truck. However my view is that their style and philosphy is in erring toward caution and taking smaller steps before jumping full force into something. The 99-06 Tundra allowed them to make a big truck at their own speed. Learn the market, perfect the processes, then go full speed.
  • dreasdaddreasdad Posts: 276
    Nissan just didn't take a hit form the Titan they also took a bigger hit fom the Quest that they had been building for years when they redisgned it and built it the same plant the Titan was built at.

    Why everbody keeps saying that Toyota is "just now" entering the larger truck is beyend me unless you only count the F-350's as larger trucks? The Titan is no bigger the current Tundra
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    Quality is a new ball game when your stepping up from a 7/8 truck. The more options you ad in frames, engines, suspensions, and cab configurations drop quality considerably. Not to mention bigger components equal bigger problems.
  • I have heard rumors that this new truck will get 380 horsepower and 420 pounds feet torque. With this much power the Tundra will sell much better than the previous generation. Hopefully a Diesel will be released in 2008 or 2009. Maybe 420 horsepower 700 pounds feet torque. Also I hope that the truck will get 20+ mpg, but chances for that are very slim. Anyway atleast it looks good. The interior is a little cheap looking. I would perfer a Tacomaish interior but I was wrong.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    I read this as a 'hope' that something goes wrong with the new Tundra. With all the class-leading capabilities it will have something ( hopefully ) has to be bad about it ..right? ;)

    What if.... nothing was bad about it and it simply was the best truck on the market? Period. With a diesel in 12-18 months and a HD package along with it the NGT could appeal to every open-minded truck user.

    The proof will be 2-3 yrs out when these first ones have been working and doing all the dirty tough jobs and other truck drivers have seen more and more of them at work. Success is not just this year or next year. This is the first vehicle of what may be the best truck over the next 15 years ( see Camry, Corolla, Tacoma ). Nothing will be proven this year or next because the trucks will be too new. But if the plants fill up quickly and Toyota sees that it will be accepted then the TX plant goes from 200K units a year to 500K units. At sometime in the next 15-20 years this will happen.
  • ustazzafustazzaf Posts: 311
    I have to agree with the comment about horsepower and tow capacity. As for ride though, I would rather have my old 68 Ford back with solid front and rear axles that I know would hold up to about anything. Just add the engine reliasbility of today. Hate carbs. If I wanted a car ride, I would buy one. For newer trucks, I think it is hard to find a better truck than the 02 vintage Tundra access cabs. Was big enough for most day to day loads, up to 6 people comfortably, and a turning radius that makes most minis envious. I know I miss mine.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    The interior is lame compared to the more refined Silverado or the older F-150. People are dreaming if they think Toyota is going to get the same reliability out of a 380 hp engine as they do a smaller v8. Not only will their quality drop but man hours per vehicle is going to increase compared to the older model with less options.
    The Japanese are lost when it comes to pickups. They got just as much chance of dropping to a one shift operation that produces 120k trucks a year.
    In 9 months GM is going to have a 6 speed in every truck, and start producing dual mode hybrids within the next 18 months. Also Toyota is going to have to prove they can build a better diesel then the Duramax, which is consistently ranked as the best large diesel engine in the world.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    As they say in horseracing..'That's why they run the race.'

    In 3-5 years we'll know.

    The Japanese are lost when it comes to pickups. They got just as much chance of dropping to a one shift operation that produces 120k trucks a year.
    In 9 months GM is going to have a 6 speed in every truck, and start producing dual mode hybrids within the next 18 months. Also Toyota is going to have to prove they can build a better diesel then the Duramax, which is consistently ranked as the best large diesel engine in the world.

    Now here's an ironic couple of statements. Who is it exactly that makes the Duramax for GM? As you say, it is for now the best on the market although Cummins would disagree.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    The duramax is originally an Isuzu. The best move GM has made in the last 10 years is buy Isuzu's diesel technology. It took them from worst to first overnight in the diesel wars, and it's been the best diesel out there for quite a few years now. Even Cummings would like to get hold of that Isuzu technology. My neighbor says his 2004 super duty Ford has the best diesel out their, but he doesn't have to hear it running three blocks away.
  • bcardbcard Posts: 1
    only the best if u are under 6 foot tall
    or like a shaloow bedded truck,thinner too.
    the company i work for bought some recently switced from a f-150 where i had more room for my 6-3 frame to sit and the bed is about 3 inches shallower and abbout an inch thinner. only plus is an inch longer
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    I'm not trying to knock Toyota trucks. I think the old Tundra was a perfect truck for a niche market, and it did about everything that 90% of owners would ever use it for. I just question how successful their going to be taking on domestics head to head. I don't think people understand how biased the full size truck segment is. When ever you have a conversation with real truck people(average truck buyer), Its all about chevy, ford, dodge, but never a word about the Titan which is a worthy competitor. I would take a Titan over a Dodge any day but most loyal truck buyers wouldn't have the same opinion.
    Toyota's going to have a tough time getting "domestic truckers" to even cross shop the Tundra. For as good as everyone here says the old Tundra is not to many Domestic truck buyers even know it exists(figuratively). Getting consumers to change brands when there's nothing wrong with the one they have now is hard to do. It's pretty hard to get people out of Camrys even when you have a competitive car like the Saturn Aura.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,693
    there is a guy a work who owns a ford ranger that keeps begging a guy with a 5 year old 'taco to sell it to him.
    the 'taco owner keeps telling himn the talk to the tundra owners, but he won't beacause he says they have too many problems.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Its all about chevy, ford, dodge, but never a word about the Titan which is a worthy competitor. I would take a Titan over a Dodge any day but most loyal truck buyers wouldn't have the same opinion

    Til now these have been the only choices C/F/D. The Titan while it has a big engine and big towing capacity it is only about as capable as a Tacoma or Frontier in carrying capacity. Infact with it's 1360 Max payload if it were to tow 9500 lbs then it could only carry a driver and maybe his lunch...no other passengers and nothing in the bed. This is the Titan's weak link.

    Put 1100 lbs in the bed of the Titan and it cannot legally tow anything!!! This is where the NGT is going to shock the 'real truckers'. Then in the manner it does it.
  • ggesqggesq Posts: 701
    IMHO- based on pictures I have seen I would rate the interiors as following from best to worst:

    1. Tundra
    2. F-150
    3. Silverado
    4. Titan
    5. Ram

    Can't wait to see a Tundra in person. ;)
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    If you asked the average truck buyer how much is his payload capacity, you would probably hear him say "a lot." Truck buyers aren't caught up in numbers like sports car guys are. You're never going to tell a Dodge Ram owner that his truck can be out hauled. Regardless what some spec sheet says.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,693
    f250? i'll see the tundra. ;)
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    until they get caught or have an accident. Then they lose their house and everything they own. Driving in excess of GVW Rating and losing control and smashing into something destroying, injuring or killing just isn't worth it.

    For a business owner his liability may not cover him if he's significantly above the GVWR...there goes his business. This isn't backyard **** measuring at a barbeque. This is just keeping it legal and getting the most value for the buck.

    If a business owner realizes that he has to send out two trucks to do the job that one can do that's literally burning up money and taking equipment from one job when it can be used on another.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,693
    how much background checking is toyota going to do before they decide it is 'ok' for someone to drive their truck? :sick:
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Huh?

    None I assume ( j/k right/ ). It's the sheriff's deputies and the insurance adjusters/underwriters that'll decide all that.

    In addition I've heard but cannot confirm that some states now are requiring any truck with a trailer must stop and go over the scales. Over the GVWR? ... then dump something on the side..after the ticket.
  • ggesqggesq Posts: 701
    Huh?

    f250?

    I don't get it. :confuse:
  • Wow that low. I think a Tacoma can haul more than that. I use to own an '05 Tacoma looked up online they rated it as a 1505 lb payload. If thats true man is the Titan pathetic.
    The new Tundra will get about 2100-2300 lbs of payload, almost as much as the Ram.
  • chevy598chevy598 Posts: 162
    If Toyota wants to sell 200k trucks a year most of them are going to be to red neck Bob, not business owners. The vast majority of pick ups sold are to individual consumers. The market would be a quarter the size it is now if it was just commercial sales.
  • ustazzafustazzaf Posts: 311
    The rated towing capacity has nothing to do with anything other than what the vehicle can tow without overheating on a test track. That fact is pointed out regularly in the reputable mags. Stopping in an emergency is going to be 90% relied upon by the trailer brakes. Doesn't matter much what the tow vehicle is.
Sign In or Register to comment.