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Mazda3 Canada

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  • tr20tr20 Posts: 76
    congrats. what year is it?
  • Hey I live in Alberta and I am looking for an 06 or older mazda 3 sport GT manual aircon and no sunroof. Any ideas of what the best prices Ican get on it. The best over the phone price (-850 cash and -500 new grad) all taxes incl is 24400$. How much lower can I go?
  • I live in Alberta and am looking for a 04/05/06 (whatever is available) mazda 3 sport GT 5 speed with aircon but no moonroof. Any tips on what is the best price I can go for. I am currently getting the best quote at 24440 (w/o any real hard negotiations at this point). That prices includes all taxes and the rebate for paying cash -850 and grad discount -500. Thanks.
  • Just one more question. With regards to the rebates, should that really be considerd as gaining ground when trying to get closer to the invoice price. Let's say that the invoice price is $23000 and you get a price of $24500 with your rebates should be happy or should you get a pretty low price and then add on the rebates. Do the rebates cut into the dealers profits or come from the manufacturer?
  • tr20tr20 Posts: 76
    Does anyone know when the Mazdaspeed 3 will come out? what are the specs? and how much it will go for?
  • Canada's Top Seven Best-Selling Cars
    by Jeremy Cato
    March 7, 2005

    http://www.canadiandriver.com/articles/jc/compact2.htm

    1. Honda Civic
    2. Toyota Corolla
    3. Mazda3
    4.-5. Pontiac Sunfire/Chevy Cavalier (before Cobalt/Pursuit arrived)
    6. Toyota Echo
    7. Ford Focus

    According to DesRosiers Automotive Consultants, entry-level vehicles now account for 39.6 per cent of new car sales in Canada.

    Reasons:
    1. Higher taxes/lower disposable income
    2. Mostly urban population
    3. Higher gas prices
    4. Stronger European influence
    5. Stronger environmental conscience

    Mazda Tribute is a car-based (i.e. fake) SUV that does not have the same appeal to cost- and environment-conscious Canadians as it does in the SUV-crazy US. I can carry almost the same amount of cargo in my Mazda3 hatchback with back seats down, and it looks way better!
  • I have a 2004 GS Sport (hatchback). I figured out A/C wasn't blowing in the first notch as soon as I pulled out of the dealer's lot, but it was too late :(

    Can anything be done about it?!! I don't like setting it to 2 all the time - too noisy!
  • Mazda3 competes with BMW only in Mazda's marketing brochures and executives wet dreams.. It's true they sometimes call it "poor man's BMW" but that's hardly a compliment ;)

    Its true competition:
    - Honda Civic (old: boring.. new: weird..)
    - Toyota Corolla (just plain boring)
    - in hatchback form: Toyota Matrix/Pontiac Vibe

    Not much competition to tell the truth!!
  • I own a 2004 GS Sport (hatchback)... - btw hate that "Sport" designation.. just call it Hatch, dammit!!

    Factory tires are Toyo Proxes 205/55R16 all-season.

    Went to Active Green+Ross looking for winter tires... liked Michelin X-Ice but they were above my budget.

    The shop guy talked me into this weird deal: Get a set of Michelin X-Ice at a different size (215/60R16) on a set of generic steel rims. He claimed it would not be a problem. This size is wider and taller than original factory tires, but goes on the same size rims. Tire diameter is 26.2" vs 24.9" (32.5 mm difference)

    Strangely, they were less expensive than the original size!! ($150 vs $180). Noted they were Q rated vs H for stock tires.. it's slower speed, could this explain the price difference?

    Paid $1,073 for 4 tires + 4 rims + taxes + labour (mount, balance etc.) I have not mounted them yet.

    QUESTIONS:
    1) Will they even fit into wheel wells, if yes, will there be scraping, weird handling etc?
    2) Anybody had any experience with this size difference? Is it safe?

    shop guy promised to replace them if they don't fit... we'll see!
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Factory tires are Toyo Proxes 205/55R16 all-season ... shop guy talked me into this weird deal: Get a set of Michelin X-Ice at a different size (215/60R16) on a set of generic steel rims. He claimed it would not be a problem. This size is wider and taller than original factory tires, but goes on the same size rims ... shop guy promised to replace them if they don't fit

    Moving to fatter (60) tires with steel rims is a good idea for winter driving (and to preserve your alloys). But, increasing the footprint by getting wider (215) tires is not, believe it or not; see below for details. My tire specialist recommended downsizing to 14" from 16" for my Protege5. Not only have they have handled superbly for three winters they are also cheaper and easier to replace. Check your manual for the sizes recommended by Mazda. Finally, make sure that the "promise" is in writing.

    Sometimes, you can save money and improve grip by going "minus one." Say your top of the line sports coupe comes with high-performance tires and wheels in the 16-inch size. A tire or auto dealer can cross-check wheel fitment and you may find that the base model of your car comes with steel wheels in the 15-inch size that are less expensive to buy (same for the tires). How can a narrower tire improve road grip? The rule of thumb from experts is that a narrower tire will cut through rain, snow and slush and bear down on the road better than a wider tire, which will tend to float up and over, losing grip in the process. Source:
    http://www.canadiandriver.com/winter/tires/winter_tires.htm
  • thanks autonomous, appreciate your advice.
    well I didn't go "minus 1" in rim size; hopefully a few cm difference in tire profile will still work.
    as far as width, my driving will be primarily on plowed roads so shouldn't be too big of a deal. thanks again, the article was informative.
  • ex_tdierex_tdier Posts: 275
    Remember, best selling doesn't equate to most reliable, which Mazda3 falls seriously short in.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Remember, best selling doesn't equate to most reliable, which Mazda3 falls seriously short in.
    Since we're "remembering", remember personal opinion is not fact. You're right to point out that best-selling doesn't equate to most reliable; however, your opinion of the Mazda3 does not seem representative. Sources like Consumer Reports rate the Mazda3 as reliable; this rating is based on thousands of reports from their 6 million readers. Reliable does not mean that there are no problems but that overall it is a better choice than an unreliable one. Consumers (whereever they are) show good sense when they make reliable vehicles popular.
  • In Winnipeg and am sure frustrated with buying here as my first experience! Only three dealers in the province. I have to decide if I want to pay $24,700 (plus taxes, air and tire tax) for an 05 hatch in black (or $500 more to ship the color I want from vancouver). Nobody here going under MSRP for an 06.
    Should I wait it out? Does Winnipeg suck for bargaining comparatively?

    Also - I'm hearing that winter tires a must for this car? True?
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Only three dealers in the province.
    Yech, that's tough! How many close (under 100km) to Winnipeg? Having so few choices is not good from a negotiating point of view but also poor for servicing (unless you have an alternative such as an independent garage).

    The $500 fee seems unbelievable. Is this the regular freight charge or in addition to it? Just to make sure I understand, if you ordered the car today and it came in a future shipment let's say a month later would the dealer charge you this additional fee? I wonder if the dealer is treating this as a "rush" fee to special order one car by having a driver deliver the car from Vancouver rather than having it shipped with other vehicles by truck. I would not pay such a fee.
  • Two dealers are in the city and another about 35 minutes out of town. Yeah, the $500 is an addition! They say they can get me black (second choice) and a couple of other colours without paying it - but I really wanted the titanium. They made it sound like its just what has to happen, no mention of a rush. Without this fee they've gone $500 lower than anyone else here but I figure if I'm paying this much...I dunno anymore! Maybe a 2006 instead?
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    So let's see:

    2005 Mazda3 Sport GT + auto + air + moonroof
    - in titanium = C$25,200 + taxes
    - in black or other = C$24,700 + taxes
    Do the above prices include freight and PDE (dealer prep)?
    Are the above after negotiation for discounts?

    2006 Mazda3 Sport GT + auto + air + moonroof
    - in titanium = what would be the price?

    Since the 2005 is a year old, it has depreciated in value. Typically, cars can depreciate close to 20% in the first year! If you took half of that (10%) as a discount, that would mean that you are looking at somewhere close to C$2500 not C$500. If you think you can manage the negotiation, try going after the car you want (2005 titanium) with no additional delivery and a C$1500 discount, i.e. final price close to $23K. If this is not your style, I would go for the 2006 titanium. You may also want to consider other cars.
  • Ok... this might be a bit of an odd question. I need winter floor mats. I went to Canadian Tire (Toronto) and they said they didn't sell any for my '04 Mazda3. I'd prefer to buy generic mats since they are much cheaper than the mazda mats at the dealer. Any suggestions? I can't possibly be the only one who needs to protect my floors so I was surprised that Cdn Tire didnt stock them. Thanks.
  • DID include freight and PDE but get this: they just called and reneged on the verbal price! Now $25200 PLUS another $500 for grey. I must truly suck at this - I did my homework and have carcostcanada prices and everything.
    Gonna just wait...and calm down a bit. Thanks for your helpful thoughts.
  • z71billz71bill Posts: 2,000
    I can see two sides -

    If the gray is really in short supply then I could see the $500 additional mark up - just like I would not see any problem with paying under invoice if I want a car that a dealer had 10 of that they can't sell - supply and demand cuts both ways.

    But I wonder if the gray is really in short supply - did you tell the sales person you really wanted gray? Are they are just jacking up the price because they think they can get you to pay more for the color you want. That is what it sound like to me.

    Since the gray cost them no more than any other color I would tell them to stick it where the sun does not shine - and find another dealer (Maybe Mazda maybe not)

    When the sales person wants to know the color I want I normally say - I am not sure - that I would consider the black, white , gray/silver or blue - I normally also say I don't like green, brown/tan/beige or red - because I really don't like these colors - that narrows it down some - I have always ended up with the color I want - and have never had anyone try and charge extra.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    All you need to say is "I need winter floor mats" and not mention a particular car. The generic one I bought from CT use heavy plastic with deep grooves to absorb water. It is more expensive than the thin plastic but it does the job. Alternatively, you can buy a set of four cheapos with one good one for the driver. The point is to prevent soaking your carpets. Make sure to check them and your carpets regularly as winter salt leaves stains.
  • ...ok, not to sound dumb or anything, but I thought I had to get ones that would fit my car - aren't they different sizes for all cars to reflect different design/configuration etc.(ie SUVs vs. smaller cars)?

    next on the list (for later)... winter tires.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    I thought I had to get ones that would fit my car - aren't they different sizes
    Yes and no. Yes, there are different sizes but no they are not for specific cars. Buy mats designed for cars not for trucks; in some cases the plastic mat can be "trimmed" around the edges using a razor knife. Actually, having an oversized plastic mat is good not only because it covers more of the carpet but being heavier it is less prone to move.

    On the topic of winter tires, you may want to scoot over to canadiandriver.ca for some informative articles. That's where, for example, you'll find that for the winter it is better to buy a smaller rather than a larger tire.
  • Knew I should've printed them out.....any chance there's a website out there that posts past lease rates? I wonder how they changed month-to-month last year. How much could it potentially go down from 6.4% 2-year lease for the 06 right now for instance.

    Alternately. if you recall any lease numbers yourself, please do post. Thank you!
  • you'll find that for the winter it is better to buy a smaller rather than a larger tire.

    autonomous, I respect your opinion but I think this "smaller tire is better for the winter" stuff is not completely justified. Whoever said that was probably talking about driving in a foot of fresh snow, which would float a fatter tire more than a skinny one (just like they use fat skis in the powder).

    Since such conditions are rare, even in Canadian winters, and since most city drivers drive on plowed roads, I believe that larger contact patch is always better than a smaller one. Any arguments contra?
  • To answer my own questions:

    - I put larger tires on, and there's this really tiny gap between the tire and the fender now. I'm afraid if the snow starts accumulating there, wheels won't turn at all.

    Tires work OK in a straight line, but they do scrape against the wheel well when cornering sharply or hitting a bump or a curb, especially at speed.

    I am VERY unhappy with Active Green+Ross dealer who assured this would not be a problem, and am bringing the car back to get proper size tires. Should have gone with my gut feeling.

    Moral of the story: Always use manufacturer recommended tire size, or at least make sure total diameter (wheel + tire) is very close to original!
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    I think this "smaller tire is better for the winter" stuff is not completely justified. Whoever said that was probably talking about driving in a foot of fresh snow, which would float a fatter tire more than a skinny one (just like they use fat skis in the powder). Since such conditions are rare, even in Canadian winters, and since most city drivers drive on plowed roads, I believe that larger contact patch is always better than a smaller one. Any arguments contra?

    Well, the short answer is expert advice and experience.

    As I mentioned earlier (post 514 above) it's been three winters of problem-free city driving (around Ottawa and to/from Montreal and Toronto) using the winter tires recommended by a tire franchise found across Canada (i.e. Frisby). Their expert advice was: use a tire with a narrow footprint and a tall sidewall. They explained that the wider the footprint the more of a chance of hydroplaning or getting stuck. I like to think of winter tires as skates with tall boots rather than snowboards. This advice was confirmed by the article in Canadian Driver that I had quoted:
    How can a narrower tire improve road grip? The rule of thumb from experts is that a narrower tire will cut through rain, snow and slush and bear down on the road better than a wider tire, which will tend to float up and over, losing grip in the process.

    p.s. I also pay attention to Mother Nature
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    using 14" wheels with narrow SUV tires for a really tall sidewall. Keeps you high and dry. ;)

    fowler3
  • Costco has a nice set (all 4) of Michelin Winter Mats for under $40, that fit decent.
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