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The Great Hybrid Battery Debate

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Comments

  • oops. mean to say replace only for same 25 miles range.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,678
    A couple things to consider. The Prius battery is about $2500. Toyota may not even sell them as they are in short supply. 6 of them would be $15,000, more than a Xebra sells for new. Second you would need a different charging system to avoid over charging the NiMH batteries. You can replace the lead acid batteries for a fraction of what just one Prius battery sells for. If you are converting a car to electric I would look into the NiMH that are offered from overseas mfg companies. You would do much better than buying from Toyota.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,678
    My pastor friend with the new 2009 Prius has a real problem. He was planning to take his new Prius to Hawaii where he will be ministering for at least two years maybe 4 years. Toyota leasing will not allow him to take it out of CA for more than 30 days. He can store it and take a chance the battery will be ruined in two years. Take it and not be able to register in HI, or just let it go back to Toyota leasing and mess up his credit. This would not be an issue with a non hybrid. It could be put in storage and not have a problem with not running for two years. Toyota leasing is not very receptive either. Something people should consider if you plan to lease. I always considered leasing a rip-off. Now I am sure of it. NO one wants to finance what is owed. He would have to come up with $8k to refinance. Any suggestions. I told him to leave the FOB on the seat in a bad part of town. I got a sermon for that idea.

    PS
    He loves the car and was looking forward to having it on Maui to save on gas.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Yes, here's a suggestion.

    Tell him to convince Toyota to let him take it to Hawaii.

    It does not hurt them one iota. They still get their money, and I bet they lease cars in Hawaii. He could cancel his "California lease" and get a new "Hawaii lease" when he gets there.

    Kinda silly to blame the hybrid technology. If it was an Avalon, Toyota would not act any different.
  • Kirstie@EdmundsKirstie@Edmunds Posts: 10,675
    No, he wasn't saying that Toyota would act differently. He's saying that the friend would be able to store a non-hybrid vehicle for two years, no problem. But by putting a hybrid vehicle in storage for 2 years, you risk having battery issues.

    Need help navigating? kirstie_h@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Well, the simple solution is to get Toyota to let him take the car to Hawaii.

    Number two on the list would be give the keys to a friend, pay them minimal fee to go start it once every two weeks or something.

    There is nothing prohibitive about a hybrid battery that means it will "die" any faster if it's not used. Toyota states in the manual that if a Prius cannot be started after a long period of non-use, just call the dealer and they will get it going.

    Extended Storage

    Disconnect the small 12-volt battery.

    It is helpful to disconnect the small, auxiliary 12-volt battery on the driver side in the trunk. With it disconnected, there will no longer be a drain from the alarm system. (Make note of the radio buttons you have programmed. You'll need to manually restore them after reconnecting the battery.)

    Draining the 273.6-volt battery-pack while in long-term storage is never a concern. When you shut off the Prius, an electric relay is deactivated. So it isn’t even connected to the rest of the system until you turn the key again.


    and another:

    Long term Storage:
    A number of people have raised the question of long term storage and its effects on the 12V and HV (High Voltage) batteries in the car. I have had some direct experience in this area. "Sparky" has been left in an airport parking lot for 14 days with no problems. Nothing was done except to park and lock her. Because of our bicoastal life, we leave the car for extended periods. Under this circumstance I disconnect the 12V battery and leave the car in the garage. She has been left for as long as 100 days with no loss of HV energy as indicated by the battery icon. In all cases of a lengthy storage, there were no problems starting the car after the 12V battery was reconnected.


    Any car put into "long term storage" is better off getting started at the very least every few months. This is not new with hybrid cars.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,732
    " pastor friend with the new 2009 Prius has a real problem. He was planning to take his new Prius to Hawaii where he will be ministering for at least two years maybe 4 years. Toyota leasing will not allow him to take it out of CA for more than 30 days. He can store it and take a chance the battery will be ruined in two years. Take it and not be able to register in HI, or just let it go back to Toyota leasing and mess up his credit. This would not be an issue with a non hybrid. It could be put in storage and not have a problem with not running for two years. Toyota leasing is not very receptive either. Something people should consider if you plan to lease. I always considered leasing a rip-off. Now I am sure of it. NO one wants to finance what is owed. He would have to come up with $8k to refinance. Any suggestions. I told him to leave the FOB on the seat in a bad part of town. I got a sermon for that idea.

    PS
    He loves the car and was looking forward to having it on Maui to save on gas. "

    Have your friend check out buying out the lease. He may be able to arrange a decent price. Then he will own the car and can take it anywhere.

    I would not advise storing any car for 2 years, during which time you are making lease payments!
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,678
    Tell him to convince Toyota to let him take it to Hawaii.

    He spent the day with Toyota finance and they would not budge an inch. No it would not make any difference if it was a Tundra or Prius. EXCEPT. You can leave a Tundra parked for 2 years without fear of the hybrid battery draining and being destroyed. While it would still be covered there would probably be a hassle and waiting for a replacement etc. They will not let you take the car out of CA for more than a month under their lease plan. He talked to the guy on Maui and got the same story. The problem is getting it licensed in Hawaii. We thought about buying it. I just don't want a red POC Prius for a $24k payoff on the lease. That is what I can buy a new one for. He got into the lease because he is a very poor preacher. Not one of the mega church guys that drive a Mercedes. He wanted the economy for all the running to visit the sick in the hospital.

    My advice is be wary of Toyota finance. They seem to be crooks IMO.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,678
    I would not advise storing any car for 2 years, during which time you are making lease payments!

    I agree. Then I would never lease a vehicle. It is a giant rip-off unless you can write the whole thing off. This preacher hardly makes enough in a year to pay any taxes. He leased as it was $200 per month less and he was planning to finance the payoff after 5 years. Why he likes the rough riding noisy little beast is beyond me. But he likes it. I feel for him and would loan him the $24k except he cannot make that big of a payment if I did not charge him any interest for 5 years. No wonder I despise lending companies almost as much as our Congress and government.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,732
    "The problem is getting it licensed in Hawaii. We thought about buying it. I just don't want a red POC Prius for a $24k payoff on the lease. That is what I can buy a new one for. "

    The cost of the vehicle is a moot point: the lease is what is referred to as a "sunk cost", which has to be paid, and it would be much cheaper to simply pay the 24K and drive the vehicle, rather than

    1. Risk having the battery go bad and have to replace or pay for it at the end of the lease. Yes, HE would have to pay because he did not treat the car appropriately, and cars need to be driven.

    2. Paying lease payments on top of whatever transportation costs the minister has in HI.

    Actually, the car payments may not be bad if he goes with a 60 month payout - possibly similar to the lease payments.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,678
    The payments on $24k are about $500 a month for 5 years. He has a 5 year lease at $299 a month. He was not sure his payoff at the end. Typical pastor. Very trusting of people and easily duped or talked into things. The best thing would be to get out of the lease if Toyota will not allow them to take the car with them. If he had any money he would not be in this mess.
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