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Jetta TDI vs. Civic Hybrid

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Comments

  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,762
    So you are just stating the truth by referring to youself as overly stubborn?

     

    It is true that there is a point when any car might be considered financialy untenable, I also agree that a car can be considered "consume able" However, I can only go by what you said. You did say that it was mechanically sound.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    I did keep that Nissan too long, but not because I was too stubborn - I was just BROKE and could not afford something newer. :)
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    fact is, old cars reach a point where it is just not financially smart to repair them.

     

    I agree with you there also. I had a 1974 Dodge van that the transmission went out at 107k miles. The engine used a lot of oil so I had both rebuilt for $1700 around 1984. I was thinking it would be easier to sell if it was running. Bottom line I was lucky to get my $1700 in trade. I probably could have sold it for $300 sitting in the driveway and come out ahead.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,762
    Well I think in the car market the dictum BUYER BEWARE was custom made!? :)

     

    This might be off topic, but when I sold my 1987 TLC with app 250,000 miles, in my estimation it had another (easily) 20 years left on the frame and sheet metal. (34 years total) It was actually pristine, but even I would admit that is in the eyes of the beholder. But, the beholder that bought the vehicle gave me 9,000 dollars for a vehicle costing 16,000 new. Clearly I sold too cheaply! :)

     

    The other shocker was, not long after he called me up, (when he identified who he was) the thought "OH BOY" crossed my mind. Then he started to emphatically say that in the future if I ever wanted to get rid of ANY of my cars, to give him the first call.

     

    The other thing is that some of the unscheduled and scheduled maintenance items become very predictable and cost contained. I also knew what stuff I could extended and what I HAD to do as preventative maintenance. Parts prices became almost commoditized.
  • cablackcablack Posts: 45
    quote: "Do you know anyone with an HCH that has a very short 3-4 mile commute."

     

    I'm not exactly that, but close. My commute is 5 miles. It includes elevation changes, two stop signs, and 10 traffic lights (which naturally always conspire against me :-) ).

     

    I've had my HCH since November. For tanks which are almost entirely commute trips, my mileage is on the order of 42-44 MPG. On highway trips that I've taken (two), my mileage was 49 and 52. After about six fill-ups, my lifetime mileage is 45.

     

    My driving style is not excessively mileage-conscious, although I tend to avoid racing to the next red light these days. I live in CA, but not the really nice temperature parts, which means 30-50 degrees, but also oxygenated fuel which decreases mileage.

     

    Don't know if that helps the debate at all, but I thought I'd chime in with my experience.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    I sold my 1987 TLC with app 250,000 miles

     

    I know how you feel. I wish I still had my 1964 Toyota Land Cruiser. I just saw one in the trader for $34k in beautiful condition. I sold mine because the engine was a real piece of trash. I should have put a 283 Chevy into it as many others did. I bought mine new for $2400.

     

    I guess we are off topic. Maybe all is said until the diesel is cleaned up in 2006 or the new Jetta hits our shores.
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,762
    I think both of your data points are a realistic representation of what you can expect from the Civic Hybrid.

     

    Not that I do not believe the hybrid is not capable of getting 93 mpg, it is just that metric probably puts it in the ranks in the upper ranges of the standard deviations on the bell shaped curve! :)
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    Don't know if that helps the debate at all, but I thought I'd chime in with my experience.

     

    Welcome to the forum. And yes we absolutely want to hear your experience with the HCH. We may get rowdy but we try to respect the other persons opinion. I would say 45 mpg average is real good, especially with your type commute. Hopefully we get some more people with Jetta TDIs to even out the debate. Right now I would say the HCH group is in the lead.
  • >>>>>>Yes, I saw some BEETLE TDI numbers at 62.

     

    .

    If a Beetle with its piss-poor 0.38 cd can get 62mpg, so too can a Jetta with its 0.29 cd. The Beetle/Jetta are exactly the same car...only differing in the top... and the Jetta is far more aerodynamic.

     

    troy
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,762
    To me the nexus for this topic is the fact the diesel with the longer anticipated engine life CAN go the distance. Whether any or even a % of folks actually do that is another story.

     

    So what happens is there are a HOST of Jetta repair and maintenance items that are really not "DIESEL" related. Upshot is you replace them when they need it and the cost becomes more commoditized for the logistical infrastructure has them in stock. Infrastructure spare parts stocking levels is probably outside the purview of this thread, but needless to say it exists.

     

    In fact, if the diesel CAN NOT go the distance, a new crate motor is app 3-4k!! This of course gives one the option of repair or replace!?

     

    Contrast that with the hybrid. When I was researching the Prius hybrid battery pack replacement was 140 dollars ea x 28 batteries or 3920 dollars!!!!
  • fact is, old cars reach a point where it is just not financially smart to repair them.

     

    .

    That's odd? I always thought it was the opposite. i.e. It's cheaper to do a $1000 radiator replacement, then to spend $20,000 going brand-new.

     
    As for large battery, why would you ever need to replace it? It's barely-used.

     

    troy
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    quote E-Troy-"That's odd? I always thought it was the opposite. i.e. It's cheaper to do a $1000 radiator replacement, then to spend $20,000 going brand-new."

     

    Only for rich people who have "car repair money" lying around in the bank is it cheaper to fix a car over and over and over than it is to buy a new car with monthly payments and warranty that covers all repair costs.

     

    Most people (in my earnings bracket) do not keep $2,000 to $4,000 dollars laying around to use for emergency car repairs.

     

    It's far more financially sound to pay $1500 for an extended warranty on a new car once every four years and let the warranty company pay for your repairs, and then get the unused portion of that warranty cost pro-rated into your new loan !!
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    That's odd? I always thought it was the opposite. i.e. It's cheaper to do a $1000 radiator replacement, then to spend $20,000 going brand-new.

     

    That may be true. However what is the point of diminishing returns. I find it practical to spend $1,100 to repair several items on the Lexus. Even though the car would only bring about $5k in trade. It still runs good and is in excellent condition cosmetically in and out. We just spent $600 for a 5 yr paint job on the 1990 Mazda 626. Why because it is still running good and is fine for running errands and lending to friends & family members that visit. I would not spend that kind of money on a car that is showing rust or breaking down every time I turn around. It is a judgment call on a case by case basis.
  • 'When you talk of reliability and longevity. Honda does Not have a great history, other than a blip the last 10 years'

     

    Pleas check the edmunds forums for cars with highest mileage and check how many Hondas come up at the top. But I guess you wouldn't coz for this argument ebay suits you. How do you presume that the more cars on sale on ebay, the longer they live? Like most of the times, your logic is wrong. Just go to a campus and see which old car is most common, you will find it to be the Civic.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    It's far more financially sound to pay $1500 for an extended warranty on a new car once every four years and let the warranty company pay for your repairs !!

     

    I know that is current wisdom and the car companies love it. Can you ever get ahead that way to where a $4000 engine repair is not a drain on your budget?
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,762
    Owning a car (whether rich or poor) does not change much the fact that cars require "care and feeding". (so to speak) Lots of things can happen to any car that is not covered by warranties, either oem or extended.

     

    So like in the case of the TLC, a radiator (600)repair actually happened closer to the 250,000 mile mark than in the mile mark that would be covered (in almost all) under extended warranties. So using your example, I would have paid 1500 dollars for the extended warranty and still would have had to pay for the radiator repair. :( :)
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,899
    Pleas check the edmunds forums for cars with highest mileage and check how many Hondas come up at the top.

     

    Please link that thread, I would be interested. The only older Honda's (Mid 1980s)I see are the CRX which I must admit is a classic. One of my favorites.
  • SylviaSylvia Posts: 1,636
    Sorry - this discussion has been beaten to death. It is clear from the inability to stay on-topic that this discussion has run its course. It will now be closing.
This discussion has been closed.