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VW Jetta TDI

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Comments

  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    I am wondering if the new 09' Jetta TDI's will have the same problem with carbon/gunk build up in the intake manifold and EGR system?
    The 1.9 ltr TDI's could carbon up enough to eventually stop the engine, and the clean up process is expensive, dirty and doesn't really solve the problem.
    I have heard that the new 2 ltr TDI engine is a complete re-design, so am curious if anyone has heard that the clogging up problems of the older engines has been resolved.


    All common rails are not created equal. Many Liberty CRDs experienced EGR valve failure early (22k miles on mine) due to LSD fuel. Failures dropped dramatically after ULSD fuel was widely available (40k miles on 2nd EGR valve and still going). Punch a CRD and lots of black smoke goes out the exhaust. The Dodge Sprinter with the Mercedes engine is a very clean diesel engine. I see them a lot where I work. They are driven hard and I have never seen even a wisp of smoke go out the exhaust on one.

    I just inspected the intake on my 2005 PD Jetta TDI last week and there is very little carbon build up at 87k miles. If it happens to need cleaning it’s not technically difficult and I can live with it.
  • For those who are interested, I live in NH and was watching TV and noticed a commercial for some TDi 09 Jettas still in stock at Lakes Region VW. I mention this because when I first purchased mine I was told I could expect to wait for about 6 months or more (this was in June of 08) for a car as they were high in demand. I ended up purchasing the dealership test model when VW made them available for sale to the public. I got the $28k plus version of the Jetta with Sirius and all of the other bells and whistles for the same price as the base model TDi. So far, I love my new Jetta. Its great on gas, and has saved me tremendously in costs as I traded in my old Subaru for the new Jetta. WAY better fuel efficiency! I have near 13,000 miles on my Jetta, and have had no problems. I love it.
  • longo2longo2 Posts: 347
    I wonder if your TDI intake system had been cleaned at some past milage? The VW service people claim that a 2 mm buildup of carbon inside the EGR and intake manifold is acceptable and normal.

    It' been suggested that a lot of urban driving contributes to the build up, but longer drives where the system gets hot, will help keep the crap moving through the engine, like it's designed. Any thoughts?

    The local VW shop recommends that the TDI intake manifold and head should be completly removed, soaked in a strong solvent and blown out, not any kind of chemical flush used on the engine. At over a hundred dollars and hour for shop rate now, that would be a nasty bill.
    I am seriously considering a new 09 Jetta TDI. So call me a Nervous Nellie if you must, but no solid information on the re-designed engine does bother me.
  • longo2longo2 Posts: 347
    Still poking around the internet trying to find answers to my 'cloging question'
    I wonder if this posting from "Freds TDI' is getting close to the secret of why some TDI engines do and others..don't..............

    "Oils that lack the CG-4 or CH-4 rating don't have the same level of anti-foaming and soot-dispersing capability. The best quality diesel-engine oils deal with it and render the soot as harmless to the engine as possible. Oils that don't meet the CG-4 or CH-4 ratings can't handle as much soot, so you need to change them sooner.

    Finally, cheaply made oils (not the same as cheaply priced ...) usually won't have the same resistance to breakdown at high temperatures, that good quality oil does. High temperatures are found in the turbocharger. When oil breaks down at high temperature over a period of time, it "cokes" or builds up deposits in the high-temperature areas, which then restrict lubrication. Bye-bye, turbo."

    If you buy a "Pre-loved" VW, you don't really know what oil has been used for changes. The VW recommended motor oil is expensive and hard to find, so if my intuition about human behavior is even half right, some V W's have been fed the wrong oil after the dealership services are over...and then I have heard that even they can't be trusted to always use the right product.

    Makes you wonder if this is the a big part of the answer...
  • I had a 2000 TDI which had a severe case of carbon/gunk buildup. 3 different dealers could not determine source of problem (after charging me for diagnosis time). Independent shop told me what was wrong as soon I explained problem without even looking at car. I now have a '06 TDI with @45K on odometer & no problems. I believe ultra low sulfur diesel may have something to do with no gunk buildup. I could be wrong.
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,231
    Did you drive your '00 model differently than your new one? From what I've seen, driving easy and not reving the motor caused the build up. Several of the folks I knew that had that problem always drove conservatively for maximum economy. I drove mine pretty hard, usually at least one WOT per day, and never had an intake problem. Mine was over 150k miles when it got totaled and it was still quite clean. Had about 1/8" of "soot" inside. So not bad. Just curious how you drove that earlier model.
  • longo2longo2 Posts: 347
    "Independent shop told me what was wrong as soon I explained problem without even looking at car."

    Hey chunky, mind sharing with us exactly what they told you? So far there have been several theories presented as to the Coking problem.
    i.e. wrong oil, bad diesel fuel, lugging the motor to save fuel, and mostly city driving.

    Hold your nose and watch this video of a unique way of cleaning out the Crud in a TDI manifold!

    http://www.errachidia.org/video/video-tdi-2-oet4qWeZuYA.html
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    I wonder if your TDI intake system had been cleaned at some past milage?

    I doubt it very much. I don't think the previous owner even changed the air filter or the fuel filter much less had the carbon cleaned. I have never seen an air filter bulged out over an inch in the middle and a fuel filter this corroded.

    It' been suggested that a lot of urban driving contributes to the build up, but longer drives where the system gets hot, will help keep the crap moving through the engine, like it's designed. Any thoughts?

    There is evidence from the nature of the tire wear that the car was driven hard, or at least braked hard.
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    No, engine oil is not part of the answer - unless the oil is so bad the engine never breaks in. Properly maintained TDIs use a tiny amount of oil. An engine would have to use a huge amount of oil to plug up an intake manifold. The carbon build up comes from the fuel by way of the EGR valve and some small amount of blow-by fed back into the intake ahead of the turbo. And, the blow-by is mostly unburned fuel containing soot, not engine oil.

    To the extent that there is a design defect in TDIs, that defect is that the engines have EGR valves. The 2009 TDI has the advantage of burning ULSD fuel from the start.
  • siberiasiberia Posts: 520
    I drove mine pretty hard, usually at least one WOT per day, and never had an intake problem. Mine was over 150k miles when it got totaled and it was still quite clean. Had about 1/8" of "soot" inside.

    My '05 TDI looks like it might have around 1/8 inch of soot by the time it hits 150k miles. The previous owner must have abused it just about right. ;)
  • longo2longo2 Posts: 347
    I have heard that using ULSD in earlier Jettas will be good for them, but using regular diesel would be an instant disaster for the exhaust systems in the new ones.

    There's lots of chatter on the internet about how great 'clean diesels' are now, so hopefully the ULSD will become avaliable at more stations.

    Honda has a new 4 cyl, clean diesel on the way in the Accord later this year..so that might finally break the ice and get the oil companies into the 21 century.

    Postings like this road test of a nice 06' have got to be helping wake up the public....(the car has ben sold)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5aDihD1AqI&feature=related
  • longo2longo2 Posts: 347
    Well, I found a 'shadow blue with grey leather' pckage 2 Jetta in the Utah Auto trader for $14885. It had about 70,000 miles and looked to be in minty condition.
    When I was able to contact the dealer about it today, they told me it had a "blown turbo" and was going to the dealership wholesale auction...tomorrow.

    Then they said what would you offer us for it?

    Keep in mind I live 1000 miles away and have no idea of what the repairs could come to, and if they did they weren't saying.
    Sorry to say I choked and told them I could not imagine what a dollar figure for the Jetta might be under these circumstances and said, take it out back and put it out of it's misery.

    Other than that it was just what I am looking for.......... :cry:
  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    From what little I know, I'd say about a grand for the turbo or so. Also, to the rest of the board, how would one blow a turbo? Would it be from abusing the car? Or just happen to be a faulty part?
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,231
    It's usually just a sensor that's bad and the dealers mis-diagnose it as being the turbo.
  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    If that's the case, then this car could end up being a fairly decent deal.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,845
    I would think someone buying at auction would bid figuring a new engine and transmission. No way to know on either one. Could be other problems also. I don't see it bringing much at auction. Though someone could make a lot of cash if it is something simple.
  • eliaselias Posts: 1,898
    on highways i've been driving in the right lane real slow due to no more hurry - driving the actual speed limit or within 5 mph.
    mpg is up from 45 mpg to 55 mpg, but the tailgators in the right lane may be worse than those in the left!
  • ruking1ruking1 Posts: 14,697
    You are setting someone up for this.

    Indeed by default and posted and printed LAW the FAR right lane is the ONLY lane not required to move out of the way of oncoming/overtaking vehicles. (keep right except to pass)

    You are perfectly within your rights to be a RLC' er (right lane camper) !!!! STAY the COURSE !! ;)

    On a more serious note as you probably would agree, as the far right lane has become or has BEEN the DEFACTO fast lane- often times I go to the slow left of the right lane to let them go by. :shades: :lemon:
  • sebring95sebring95 Posts: 3,231
    I always felt one of the big advantages of the TDI was the ability to run 75-80mph and still get 45+mpg. Plus it felt very nice at those speeds. My short-lived relationship with an '07 Civic was the exact opposite. Felt like a schooner at 80mph and took a big dive in mpg. Your poor car is probably embarrassed to be clogging up the right lane....born to run!
  • c280c280 Posts: 21
    Would you make the leap to the Tiguan TDI if VW brings it to States or would you stick with your Jetta TDI?
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