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VW Jetta TDI

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Comments

  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    Unfortunately I don't have too much time to shop around back home, I'm out on the road all week this week, and leaving the country next week for the rest of the year and I'd like to have it done before I go. I just picked a place based on the dealership's recommendation, and hoping for the best!
  • m6userm6user Posts: 2,996
    It's possible I've been lucky or my cars/trucks were pretty easy to replace the windshields on. That's what I have insurance for. If they screw it up, they fix it.
  • altair4altair4 Posts: 1,469
    I pass several autobody shops on my way to work. Can't tell you the number of times I've seen mobile glass truck guys doing the install of a new windshield at all of them. Not saying all bodyshops farm out that work, but at least some do.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    edited September 2010
    I think it depends a lot on the individual competency of the mobile installer, as well as the type of car he is working on. Some guys get in over their heads.

    MODERATOR

  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    Had the window shop replace the windshield yesterday, everything looks just fine, although the rear view mirror might be slightly lower by a fraction of an inch (no big deal). I'm glad he was able to keep my base sticker intact.
  • f1docf1doc Posts: 3
    I have encountered the same complete loss of throttle response in my daughter's 2010 SW TDI w/DSG. It is NOT due to left foot braking, as the dealer claims. This is dangerous. Any ideas?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    You mean she feels a momentary "dead pedal"?

    Yeah, that has plagued any number of cars with electronic throttles. I've seen various aftermarket fixes, but not yet for a VW TDI. Apparently you can wire in a different sensor to the gas pedal, which must vary the signal to the throttle controls.

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  • f1docf1doc Posts: 3
    This occurs hot or cold, often on a slight incline, from dead stop. I have encountered it. Various forums and C&D review have blamed turbo lag, throttle by wire, software glitches involving the DSG and prevention of "over-reving" and brake switch preventing throttle up. This is a scary phenomenon! Just enough power is produced to get the car into the middle of the intersection, then idle engine rev only for 2-3 seconds, unaffected by throttle pumping. The dealer is clueless, though he also doesn't admit to knowledge of existing TSB's on this issue. I love the car otherwise but will sell it (back to VW!) if this is not repaired.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    edited October 2010
    That certainly doesn't sound like turbo lag. I couldn't find a TSB on this, only older ones. That doesn't mean there isn't one. Maybe someone can track it down?

    Oh, wait, here's something.

    NHTSA has just opened an investigation (August):

    NHTSA Action Number:
    PE10034

    Summary:
    The Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) has received 7 complaints on 2009 Volkswagen Jetta TDI vehicles alleging that while driving and without warning the engine limped and then stalled almost immediately. A Preliminary Evaluation has been opened to assess the scope, frequency, and potential safety consequences associated with the alleged defect.

    No doubt this will grind very very slowly but ultimately might result in a recall.

    MODERATOR

  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    Glad to hear the NHTSA is looking into this. Not sure if it is really a problem or not, but is quite annoying when it happens. It happened when I first got the car, just assumed it was "normal".
  • shriftyshrifty Posts: 255
    Has anyone heard any further details regarding this investigation?
  • This may be a stupid question but does this car have more than one battery?
  • eliaselias Posts: 1,916
    06 jetta tdi has just one battery... a big one !
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    Diesel cars need stronger batteries. Never cheap out on a diesel car battery.

    MODERATOR

  • bpeeblesbpeebles Posts: 4,085
    edited November 2010
    My wifes 2003 TDI has gone thru 6 Vermont winters on the original battery. A new one from "Interstate Batteries" lists for $245.95. This MTP-H7 battery one of the most powerful batteries in the industry

    Everyone knows that "Interstate Batteries" sells the best batteries on the planet. Most contractors have their rechargable powertools rebuilt at "Interstate Batteries". I also get all my cell-phone batteries from "Interstate Batteries".

    We plug in the TDI block-heater anytime the ambient temp goes below 0F. This adds many years to the batteries life.
  • cosmocosmo Posts: 203
    Just replaced the battery on our 2004 Passat TDI wagon after 6 Washington winters (75 months of life). It was noticeably low, but not dead yet. Dealer price for original equipment battery: $110.00 minus $20 discount plus $19 labor.
  • Has anybody ran across their TDI using oil. I recently got a 2002 TDI Jetta 198,000 and noticed that the guy carried oil with him. I checked the oil and found he was a 1.5 qts. low. Any suggestions. I am not leaking it out anywhere and filter area is pretty clean just small seepage from changing filter. I called previous owner and found he had 4,000 miles on oil. He uses synthetic oil with the gc-4. Is it true that the service interval is 15,000 mile?
  • You should go here: www.tdiclub.com.
    you will find lot's of info
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    edited November 2010
    It would be perfectly normal for an engine with 198K to be using oil. The engine is somewhat near normal statistical life span at this point (what the engineers aimed for). Some go a lot more, and I hope yours does, some go a lot less, but about 225K is what a passenger car diesel engine can usually provide.

    If I were in your shoes, I'd first calculate how much oil is being used and make a judgment on service intervals based on that.

    These published factory service intervals are for NEW cars---that's not your car anymore. Witha little extra TLC, you can probably push that engine to beyond 225K statistics.

    MODERATOR

  • bpeeblesbpeebles Posts: 4,085
    edited November 2010
    Proper engine oil for 2004 TDI is VW 505.00 (There are some followon specs which may meet requiremens too like 505.01) Personally, I use Pentosin Oil

    OCI (Oil Change Interval) is 10,000 miles. (not 15K as you suggest)

    Try running the CORRECT oil and see if this helps reduce the consumption. These engines are good for about 400,000 miles. so yours is still young.

    Also, do not forget to use FULL THROTTLE ACCELLERATION at least once per tank of fuel. Otherwise, the turbocharger and intercooler will start to choke up. Watch your rearview mirror whilst doing this... once things are clean, you should NOT see any black smoke during full-throttle. As long as you are getting black smoke, you are cleaning the crud out of it. (burning carbon off of turbocharger vanes)

    You may also suspect the turbocharger-seal could be leaking oil. The intercooler may be collecting oil in the bottom of it. Also check the intake-manifold to see if the inside of it is not gettting choked with goopy oil residue.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    Engineers usually put out numbers like 4000 hours for a small diesel engine. So at 60 mph that's 240K miles. Even with a 25% fudge factor, that's 300K.

    MODERATOR

  • bpeeblesbpeebles Posts: 4,085
    Lets not forget that the original VW TDI engine is STILL used in ocean-going vessels with very good reliability.

    Yes, it is kinda fuzzy math converting HOURS to MILES... however, your numbers do not match the others I have seen regarding the design-hours for the original TDI engine.

    In any case, the suspension, body and other moving parts will wear out long before a well- cared-for TDI engine.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    You could be right...all I'm saying is that in 40 years of fixing, buying, selling and appraising cars, I have never personally viewed a single odometer with 400K on it. One hears of these things but I never did see one myself.

    I dunno, I just think it's setting expectations unrealistically high.

    But you are 100% correct on suggesting the point is moot, since very few cars survive long enough to even *get* near 400K---they succumb to collision, vandalism, or some other catastrophe of wear and tear.

    Getting back to the TDI in general, here's an interesting road test of the 2011 TDI---interesting in that it tested fuel economy in a "conservative" "normal" and "fuel mileage be damned" mode. The conclusions were not what you might expect:


    2011 Jetta TDI Road Test

    MODERATOR

  • bpeeblesbpeebles Posts: 4,085
    edited November 2010
    Thanks for the link - Actually, the 'conclusions' are simply the personal feelings of the testers. I have a knack of disreguarding their personal opionions.

    I am much more interested in the facts -n- figures. The MPG numbers they acheived are to be expected from a test-mule vehicle which was most certainly not broken-in with loving care. Also, the best MPG is not realized until after about 30,000 miles. (Even my gasoline engines had better MPG after about 30K.)... this may be due more to the gears, bearings and other moving components of the drivetrain "losening up".

    I find it interesting that some "testers" tend to forget this is a large-heavy vehicle with a lot of amenities... yet they insist on comparing it to a hybred which was specifically designed to be efficent. (Small and NOT adorned with all those amenities.)
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    Well I don't think it's merely an "opinion". That's not quite fair, is it?

    ---they did in fact gather quantitative data. It might not be the *best* science, but it is better than throwing out numbers over a couple of beers.

    I do agree, though, that comparing the Jetta to a hybrid rather misses the total picture.

    Actually it wasn't the fuel mileage per se that interested me--it was that spirited driving yielded almost as much fuel economy as being conservative. That's what I thought was worth mentioning. It rather speaks to the characteristics of diesel engines I think.

    MODERATOR

  • eliaselias Posts: 1,916
    Most of us TDI owners know from experience how the "drive it like you stole it" approach can yield optimal mpg! I drive my gassers like that too. Leadfoot up to desired speed, then into top/desired gear.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 44,854
    Yep. Heavy throttle and somewhat short-shifting is probably optimum.

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  • colin_lcolin_l Posts: 591
    Well I don't think it's merely an "opinion". That's not quite fair, is it?

    Definitely not.

    Some gas engines behave this way too, but IMHO it seems to be mostly moderate horsepower / performance vehicles. If you try this with a Camaro SS, it won't work out in favor of leadfooting. But I bet the results would be highly similar for other sub-200 HP compact and midsize cars.
  • 104wb104wb Posts: 38
    Spirited driving - a situation where spark ignition engines can easily be enriching the fuel/air ratio beyond stoichiometric to cool the converter or the exhaust manifold or the exhaust valves, thereby 'wasting' fuel. Diesels operate globally lean, injecting only the necessary amount of fuel to meet the load requirement.

    I have a diesel Ram and an Olds Achieva SCX, both with 5spd manuals. I use two routes home from work, one highway, the other stop and go. The diesel loses 5% FE on the stop and go route, and the Olds loses 10%. That's with babying the Olds and flogging the Ram, too.
  • cosmocosmo Posts: 203
    -14F this AM when I went out to shovel the driveway. Started the 06 Jetta TDI that had shielded at least 1/8 of the driveway. It took two tries, but after it was idling smoothly I turned on the defroster and rear widow heating elements and let it run while I shoveled away. Twenty minutes later, when I finished shoveling, the windshield and rear window were ice-free and the ice on the side windows was soft enough to scrape easily. That standard auxiliary electric heater saved me several more minutes of icy misery. Of course, the engine temperature gauge needle had not budged.
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