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Ford Mustang Prices Paid and Buying Experience

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  • That is quick. I ordered mine in Nov, it was built and shipped on 12/12 and I am still waiting for it. I hope yours ships quicker.
  • cmhullcmhull Posts: 1
    I live in North Carolina and am days away from buying an 06 Coupe V6 Mustang. Would anyone here be able to tell me what Ford "factory-to-dealer" incentive is on this car? Also, any info on what their "floorplan fee/wholesale financial reserves" is? Any help is appreciated!
  • I factory ordered a 2006 GT Premium, loaded (minus shaker 1000), 18" fanblades, on 1/4/2006. Price was invoice + 250 doc fee (got it down from $399 - ridiculous here in NC). I was extremely happy and surprised at this price. Did I get lucky or are we starting to see GT's at or close to invoice? (I had invoice deal ready to go on a V6 since September, so I know those deals are common).
  • I think your getting a better deal from the dealers if you order the car. The dealers in my area aren't giving out good deals on stock vehicles but if you order it you can get a good deal.

    I got employee pricing on a 06 GT in December when I ordered it. My baby was built last Tues, still waiting on him to leave Flint Rock though.
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    jrent....just a little history should explain the barely used Mustangs.

    When the '05 Mustang was released, demand was much higher than what the factory produced. Ford went so far as to up production of the Mustang to meet demand. It still wasn't enough to cover demand. There were about 13,000 people who ordered an '05 Mustang that Ford coudln't produce. This shortage was particularly acute with the GT version.

    Some of us (me included) were fortunate enough to buy the '05 Mustang GT at one of Ford's discount plans (vast majority of these sold at, or above MSRP due to demand exceeding supply).

    Dealers were paying top dollar for private sales of these GTs as well as at the auctions.

    Bottom line, I owned my '05 Mustang GT for about 9 months. I bought/ordered it using Ford's "X-plan". Since a lot of people had ordered, waited a year (or more) to get one, they finally decided to look at used. I sold mine for no other reason than I owned it for 9 months and was able to sell it for well over what I paid for it.

    I think this phenomena has eased slightly, but I still don't see many new '06 GTs on dealers lots. Demand is still high, therefore resale is still high.

    Add to that fact, there just isn't much on the market that appeals to the muscle car enthusiast....The Hemi Charger (still a 4-door, and with an automatic tranny), the GTO (which has been a disappointment for GM for many reasons...and still doesn't sell well) are the only ones. Plus, those cars still cost more than a Mustang GT, for essentiallly the same performance of the Mustang.

    There are some muscle cars that supposedly are coming down the pike (Camaro, Dodge Challenger), but those aren't guaranteed to be put into production. Even if they do get to the factory floor, it won't be for another 3-4 years.

    So, that's the reason the Mustang (especially the GT) is so popular, in so high demand, and still commands good money on the used market (and also the reason there are used ones on the market....former owners made money on them).
  • I bought my wife a 50th birthday present on 1/10/06. An 05 Mustang Convertible premium. Sticker price $28000, price paid out the door $24500 tax, tile etc. Sure beats the A plan. When I met her she was a young girl with an old Mustang. Now she is an old girl with a new Mustang!
  • Didn't believe the above about the glut of used GT's, so checked out the online San Francisco Chronicle used car ads:

    1) Found one GT, automatic. None with manual.

    2) All the cars are being sold by car dealers and car rental agencies, none by private owners. Dealers are probably selling repossessed cars. Rental agencies are all selling V6's, no V8's.

    3) The vast majority of cars advertised, in fact all but a couple, were V6's.

    The GT Premium remains rare, hard to find used or new, and is even rarer in popular colors with a manual tranny.
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    pony-pirate....I don't think there's a glut of '05+ Mustang GTs on the market. There are a few. It could be because they're repos. I know some people (some on these boards) that bought the Mustang GT because in looked "cool"....no other reason. Car rental agencies don't even carry GTs....just V6s....and those are all automatics.

    A while ago, I related a story about a woman who bought a Mustang GT. She complained that it was loud (she didn't like the exhaust note...go figure) and rode too hard. After quizzing her, she said her previous car was a Solara. Now, these two cars have little in common other than they were both coupes. I don't know what became of her Mustang GT, but I'd bet a dollar to a dime, she traded it for something more sedate.

    Fact is, since the '06s have been out, I've seen maybe 1 GT per dealer sitting on their lot (and even that's a rare sight). Those weren't there more than a few days.

    You are correct....Mustang GTs of either '05 or '06 vintage, with manual trannys, especially premium versions, are very hard to come by.

    Just looked in the local paper this a.m. There was a dealer ad for an '05 GT base with automatic. The car probably stickered for $28K. Asking price was $29K....USED with 4K miles.

    This car (GT version) has been out more than a year, and demand is still very high.
  • jrentjrent Posts: 15
    Graphicguy...Thanks very much for the education. I forgot about the high demand and special buying incentives. Now it makes sense to me, appreciate your insight.
  • My wife ordered me the car of my dreams for Christmas. 06 Premium convertable with the Pony package. Sticker 29300 paid around 25700 (D-plan). We have to pay the taxes separately here in Missouri, so that will add another 1500 or so. But I'd much rather pay a little more for a brand new one. One dealer around here had 3000 off all their Stangs, but I didn't notice any GT's.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,835
    A reporter from a large local newspaper would like to speak to consumers in Southern California who have recently purchased or shopped for a Ford and why they either purchased a Ford or decided on purchasing another vehicle. If you would to speak with the media, please respond to ctalati@edmunds.com with your daytime contact info., city/state of residence no later than January 19, 2006.

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  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    jrent....glad to have helped. There were many of us around here who were among the first to get the new Mustang. We lived through all the hypoe, ordering and waiting, so are familiar with the history. Some of us got lucky and found dealers who weren't really sure how popular the new body style would be last winter when they first came out. They were used to selling pre '05 Mustangs for invoice less big incentives. Those dealers were willing to put in orders for us that included employee purchase programs. Once it was clear Ford had a runaway hit on their hands, and dealers couldn't get their hands on enough of them (GTs), prices were, at best, MSRP. Some even sold the ones they could get their hands on for well over MSRP.....and people paid that amount.

    I resisted selling mine for 9 months, but had plenty of offers for MSRP, even though it was used. I kept it, drove it, put nothing but gas in it (dealer even gave me my first oil change for free). Then, one day, someone made an offer for a couple thousand more than I paid for it....and I finally said "OK". That's never happened to me before (and probably never again).

    I'm certain some bought one and couldn't afford it. So, here comes the repo man. Those cars end up at the auctions, too.

    V6 Mustangs, on the other hand, are fairly plentiful. Still, Ford hasn't slapped any incentives on those units yet. So, they must be selling pretty well, too.

    The Mustang GT is pretty unique to the market. You aren't going to find a car that's been the styling hit the new Mustang has been, that handles well, comes well-equipped, that'll do 0-60 in less than 6 seconds, that has won all the automotive press accolades, for anywhere under $30K MSRP.

    The Mustang GT is playing in a sandbox of 1 with all those attributes.

    By the time the competition catches up (if they can catch up) with the likes of the Challenger and Camaro (neither has been given the green light for production), the Mustang will probably up the quotient with something like a BOSS or MACH version. If the Dodge and/or Chevy answer to the Mustang ever do hit the streets ('08 or '09), the Mustang will be ready to be revamped in it's 4th model year.

    Let's not forget that later on THIS YEAR, the Shelby GT 500 Mustang, with 475 HP will hit the streets with an MSRP of less than $40K.
  • 1panky1panky Posts: 34
    I see the same false conclusion to why buyers can't locate the manual GT version Mustangs. it is not that there is a high demand for this model, it is because there are so few being produced with the options wanted. There are many Mustangs in the dealership lots here in the metro DC area because they are either V6 automatics or models that the few thousand on the present waiting lists do not want and other potential customers are not willing to pay the high prices the dealers are still attempting to get. It has to do with poor planning by the manufacturer and it's failure to look at the play-book of the 1964/65 Mustang launch. Lets face it, the Mustang is a basic production vehicle that should not have been marketed with such huge mark-ups that did not benefit the manufacturer's bottom line. These vehicles should have been reasonably priced as the production vehicle that they are to move them off the lot no matter which model was chosen. Having a situation where there are limited manual v8's or an unwillingness to offer GT packages for the 6's was truly a monumental blunder on the manufacturing side. The baby boomers such as myself who decided to wait and see how prices etc. worked in the future, feel we made a good decision in waiting. I have a 2004 GT premium with the manual tranny and have had to date over 20,000 happy and uneventful miles. Chrysler is following in the same sorry marketing model as Ford by limiting the availability of the Charger Hemi and pricing them quite high with mark-ups. Moving volumes of regular production models that mimic styles of the past is the way to go to maufacturer profitability. Marketing these vehicles as limited production models is a "fool-hardy" marketing plan at best. This is why you can go to any of the Ford dealers I have visited and see loads of unsold Mustangs languishing on the lot. It also doesn't help to have new vehicles produced at such a pace only to be plagued by annoying later repairs due to slopping workmanship or design. Bring back the old marketing professionals and keep the hard driving college kids out of the decision process and we will all have a good and profitable time.
  • The only unsold Mustangs I've seen "languishing" on dealers' lots are V6's and a few Rousche's. Don't believe me? Go online or pick up a phone and check out what dealers have available for sale.

    I disagree about the above criticism of Ford's strategy. Putting a car into production is a multimillion, if not billion, dollar proposition, included in which is very careful, very expensive market research. Projections of the precise price point most likely to generate the greatest sales have been very very carefully worked out.

    Ford is currently running TV ads for the Mustang. Featured prominently in those ads is the GT. But that doesn't mean they're out to sell GT's? Far from it. They're using the GT to lure customers, to create the image, the mystique, knowing full well that the consumer market for higher-priced high-performance V8's with manual transmissions is limited compared to the broader, deeper market for the much cheaper V6's. The long-term consumer market for Mustangs lies with the V6, not the GT. The GT, by comparison, represents a specialized niche market, ergo the limited production. It's no coincidence that that has been the pattern with Mustang sales from the beginning.

    The GT w/ manual tranny is almost exclusively a male car. The auto tranny V6 is for both sexes, has a broader, more general appeal. You can't make much money with a car that appeals to only half the population.

    And look what's out on the road: GT's are relatively rare, even less common than V6 convertibles. The V6's are popping up everywhere. The V6's even outnumber the GT's in these forums, which tend to have a disproportionate number of male enthusiasts.
  • Can someone give me a detailed description of what I can expect from the dealership when I start to wheel and deal for my new 06 GT? I have a X-Plan friends and family discount and the dealership said I would get "above invoice" pricing??? What does that mean?

    I have asked and read the difference in discount pricing before but want to understand it so I don't get hoodwinked. 1) I am female 2)I have done my research but still feel "stupid" when talking to sales men. Why do I always feel like I am getting cheated?

    Anyway, I have a trade it worth $1,200 (KBB value) - will have cash down - approximately $2,000 or a little more PLUS the X-Plan discount. I am tossing between the GT Premimum or V6 Premimum Convertible. Can someone help? Sorry to keep dwelling on an old subject.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,835
    A reporter is looking to speak with someone who purchased a Ford Fusion, Dodge Charger, Chrysler 300 or new Ford Mustang and previously drove an SUV or an import. Please send an e-mail to jfallon@edmunds.com no later than Tuesday, January 24, 2005 containing your daytime contact information and a few words about your choices.

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  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,835
    You Mustang fans are popular :)

    A reporter is looking to speak with a new Mustang owner who was a fan of the 1960s era Mustang but not the 1980s or 1990s era Mustangs. Please send an e-mail to jfallon@edmunds.com no later than Tuesday, January 24, 2005 containing your daytime contact information and a few words about how you feel about the new Mustang.

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  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    Ford made approximately 60,000+ '05 Mustang GTs (far from being "limited production"). Don't know what '06 production will be, yet. But, since demand is still high, I expect them to make just as many '06s.

    But fact is, the reason for the shortage of GTs is demand, pure and simple. Ford can't keep up. Believe me, no one at Ford wants to "short sell" any of their models. If they can build to demand, they'd do so. Ford has only one plant making the Mustangs....and they share that production facility with the Mazda 6's production.

    Ford had made 140,000 pre '05 Mustangs. They upped production for '05 models to 150,000. Then, as it became clear that number still wasn't enough, they upped production again to 190,000 units (or full plant capacity). That still didn't meet demand (at least for the GTs). GT production is approximately 30% of all production. They can't produce any more than 30% because the 4.6L engine (as well as many other components) is shared with the SUVs and F-150s (in different states of tune, though).

    Dealers set their own prices. Dealers are not required to honor X plan (friends and family), A plan (Ford employee pricing), etc. It's totally up to the dealer. X plan pricing is at or near invoice (depending on model and options). IF you find a dealer that will honor any of the Ford pricing plans for the Mustang GT, jump on it. The vast majority of them won't (but will for slower selling models like the 500, Explorer, F-150, etc).
  • 1panky1panky Posts: 34
    The two points taken in reply to my earlier posting were interesting and informative. I don't agree with the "Ford knows what it is doing" chorus or that the 60,000 units built is something to "cheer" about. The financial bottom-line of the company demonstrates, that they along with other manufacturers have dropped the ball in this area. It's a good thing a powerful investor as Mr. Kerkorian is not present to breathe urgency in the pending "turn-a-round."

    If planned properly, the demand for the Mustang would be present for the entire line and not just one segment of production. Today, you can still drive to work and rarely see a Mustang on the road. This is not a positive sign for a "high-production" model no matter how you look at it.

    I am old enough to remember the sales of the first Mustangs in the 60's. All units regardless of model was snapped up. Customers actually followed the delivery trucks to the dealership to purchase one. You saw these cars everywhere even on your street (my street had two!). You couldn't read a magazine without a advertisement of this new offering and this "excitement" continued well-into the '65 year run. This was indeed volume sales and demand at it's best along with professional marketing. This, of course, was before the internet advertising philosophy (post it; and they will come!). The sales numbers then greatly dwarfed the numbers of today's model.

    Unfortunately, the pricing of the new models are just too high in my opinion to compete with other offerings. And as for marketing, you don't really see much after the infamous Steve Mc Queen t.v. commercial. The numbers of units still on dealer lots appear to point to this point. There may well be a disconnect in the marketing plan; if there is a plan curentcurrently. a former PR "hack", my "limited" experience tells me that "someone has dropped the ball along the way," as my old boss used to say. I discussion has come up in conversations I have had with several sales personnel at my local dealer during my trips for scheduled maintenance on my '04 GT. They say it would be great if they could provide a more resonablreasonableo clear their lots. The product is present and ready to go but, potential customers are not willing to pay premium prices for six-bangers. Chrysler is also experiencing this situation with the Dodge Charger. The hemi models are in short supply but,their base models are priced too rich for those showing any initial interest.

    There are some great offerings coming on line in the near future mimicking the 60's muscle cars from the other manufacturers. Time will tell if their "market-teers" will follow this same, sad pricing guideline. When all is said and done; the fact remains that the manufacturer cannot survive by selling a percentage of a 160K unit run. There is a small window of opportunity for the "excitement" of these types of offerings to ultimately die down and the window is getting smaller as this segment gets crowded by other manufacturers.
  • graphic guy, I would like to know the source for your quote of 60,000 '05 Mustang GT's produced. This seems quite high to me.

    In evaluating a company's performance, sales are only one measure. One has to take into account a host of other variables, conveniently termed a "business model," to determine its profitablity. In short, Ford and GM may be riddled with waste and unnecessary costs. The burden of costs added by unionization, as one example, has already been brought up here.
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    With all due respect "panky", it sounds like your beef is with the dealer for not selling you a Mustang for what YOU want to pay. Not a problem. You keep your dollars. The dealer finds someone else to sell to.

    Fact is, the MSRP for an '05+ Mustang GT (non-convertible) will vary from about $26K (standard) to $28+K (premium...all loaded up). To find that kind of style, with performance of 0-60 in under 6 seconds, good handling, many features, is next to impossible. We've debated several times about the Pontiac GTO being similar, but the style is "ho-hum", and it stickers for over $30K. GM has had, and continues to have a hard time selling them....even with rebates.

    I've seen V6 Mustangs selling for around the $18K range (base models). While they are much more plentiful than the GTs, I don't see any fire sales on them. Ford certainly hasn't needed to put any incentives on them. Plus, you'll see more of them on the lots because Ford makes 3 times as many V6 Mustangs as they do GTs. The lower price point dictates they'll sell more V6s than they do the costlier GTs.

    My former dealer had 6 V6 Mustangs on their lot (no GTs) as of Jan 2-3. They're all gone, now. He's waiting for his next shipment of Mustangs to arrive. It takes him all of 2-3 weeks to turn over his entire Mustang inventory. That's damn good. The story repeats itself with just about every Ford dealer around me....even with snow on the ground when coupe sales are slow.

    I'm sure the mix for Chargers is similar to the Mustang. Base models are always more plentiful than the premium models (in this case, the Hemi version) because they produce more base models.

    Because you want to buy a GT, but either can't find one, or aren't willing to pay the going rate for one, doesn't mean they aren't priced right. On the contrary...if most people wouldn't buy them at the price asked, supply and demand dictates that the sales price would be lower.

    The excitement factor for the Mustang is still high....over a year after they were brought to market. That's why GTs are hard to come by, even though the plant is running at full capacity.
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    pirate....at the beginning of the production run of '05 Mustangs, Ford released a PR stating they were ramped up to produce 150,000 Mustangs...of which, 1/3rd would be GTs. When it became clear that the 150,000 production ramp up wouldn't be enough to meet demand, Ford announced they were upping production to 190,000 units. I think there was another PR that stated they would make the split 60% for V6s and 40% GTs for the remainder of the '05 production run (if memory serves, that was sometime in the May/June '05 time frame).

    Being conservative, 1/3rd of 190,000 is ~60,000 units for GT production ('05 models). With '06 production in full swing, I expect that 60,000 number is even higher adding together both '05 and '06 GT production, so far.
  • Hi Everyone
    I'm fairly new to the Mustang forum. I have been following it for a few weeks now. Yesterday, I ordered my GT Premium Redfire convertible and they wouldn't budge from the MSRP but I expected that from the start.

    Is there a way of following the progress of my Mustang through production. I ordered a Dodge Truck years back and I was given a order number so I could call an automated line and get updated on its progress throughout production and delivery. Does Ford do the same thing or do I have to call the dealership periodically to get info?

    I have the VOC with a priority code of 10 and today the salesman called me a gave me the VIN number.

    Any info or reference to a previous post would be helpful.

    Thanks
    Ken
  • graphic guy, then your production numbers are based on Ford press releases of projected, not actual production. I'm curious about actual numbers, amount produced, amount sold, for each model. Are these available anywhere?

    Another interesting stat would be geographic breakdown of sales. For one, I see a whole lot more Mustangs in southern than in northern Calif.
  • lmmlmm Posts: 70
    Once you have the VIN you can follow your cars progress.
    go here and follow the post instructions:
    http://www.blueovalforums.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=4&hl=tracking
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    fire.....you're in good shape. You've got the right priority #, the VOC and, most importantly...the VIN#. That means it's going to be produced in the next several weeks. With delivery time, it should be on the ground in 8-10 weeks.
  • graphicguygraphicguy SW OhioPosts: 7,132
    pirate...I have no idea what the final production numbers were....only that 13,000 units could not be produced for '05 Mustang orders.

    I would say that all that were produced of the '05 model year, were indeed sold. I certainly haven't seen any ads or stock of '05 units being advertised or on dealer lots. Of course, I've not been to every Ford dealer in the country, either.

    Don't know what the breakdown by geography of Mustang sales. I'm sure Ford knows. But it's up to them to publicize those numbers. I haven't seen them posted anywhere, though.

    I would imagine that warmer climates would have sold more Mustangs than colder ones. That would explain seeing more Mustangs on the road in Southern CA than in Northern CA. Coupe sales are always stronger in warmer climates.
  • thanks for all your help

    ken
  • :confuse: I ordered an '06 V6 Pony Pack on November 6th. Here's what the dealership told me.
    Receipt Date: 11/09/05 (I got my VIN# the next week)
    Scheduled Date: 12/12/05
    Status Date: 12/16/05
    Description: PRODUCED
    Delivery ETA: 12/27/05

    Alright. So it's built. And not here yet. Flat Rock is 6 hours drive from Totonto, and I'm in the biggest shipping center in the country, and still no car. The dealership as expressed their anger to Ford and they 'dont know what to tell me'. According to them, the "don't know where it is". Now, I'm frustrated because you'd think they should be able to call ford and request status of this car and get a straight answer. Surely Ford tracks these vehicles during shipping via rail or truck? Why can't I get a straight answer as to why this car is almost a month late? Or at least an snswer like "You car is scheduled to leave Michigan a XX date?"

    It just makes me think that either the dealership is BSing me, or Ford has 'lost' the car.

    Any suggestions?

    -Still driving a Dodge Neon. ARGH!
  • I understand your frustration. Mine was built a few days before yours, and supposedly shipped on 12/12. Well I finally recvd it a few days ago, it took over a month to deliver it. During that month+ I also could not get any info until days before it arrived. Hopefully yours will arrive soon. I agree that I must be easy to track these cars, but for some reason Ford or the dealer will not do it. Im not sure why. Good luck, it will be worth the wait.
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