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Project Cars--You Get to Vote on "Hold 'em or Fold 'em"

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Comments

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,577
    I just noticed that '70 Impala doesn't have air conditioning. Still, seems like a nice car otherwise. And in my case, none of my old cars have functional a/c anyway, so I wouldn't know the difference. :P
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,118
    A lot of people, especially in the northern states, chose to not add A/C on Chevys, Fords and Plymouths in those days, even on Impalas, Galaxies and Fury IIIs. As one might expect, factory A/C was more common on mid-priced brands, but it largely depended on where you lived. My parents, who lived in Wisconsin, bought a new '57 New Yorker, which they traded for a '63 Dynamic 88. Neither had A/C. Most didn't in the Upper Midwest, in those days.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    AC is a big plus on classic cars these days. Worth a good 5% to 10% of total value.
  • gsemikegsemike Long Island, NYPosts: 1,743
    My first car was a 73 Charger

    A little short on details but what do you think?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,577
    I never liked that rear quarter window treatment, as I prefer a true hardtop where there's a choice. Still, from what little I can tell in the pics, looks like it could be a nice car.

    It would be nice if the seller had listed which engine it has. According to my old car book, the Charger SE has a standard V-8, so at the least, it has the 150 hp 318. It also lists a 240 hp 340, a 175 hp 400, a 260 hp 400, and even a 280 hp 440. My guess is that the vast majority just had the 318 or the 175 hp 400. But by now, who knows, it might have been hopped up.
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    Not enough details. It's a '73, so outside the 'desirability zone' for muscle cars, and if it's a small block and if it has a few needs, then the price is just about market correct.

    If it were a very clean small block inside and out, say a #3 car (clean daily driver) there could be some money left on the table here.

    But if there's some minor rust, or ripped upholstery, or missing parts, or bad body work, then the car is worth no more than he's asking.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,577
    If that car just had the run-of-the-mill, 175 hp 400, would it be worth much more than the 150 hp 318?

    And, how would the 240 hp 340 stack up against the 260 hp 400 or 280 hp 440 for value? I wonder if the 340 might actually be the better choice, since it would be lighter than the big-blocks, but still has a lot of hp? I guess the 400 and 440 would out-torque it by a wide margin, though?
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,423
    If I really wanted a Charger, I'd save up for an earlier one. But if it was a '73, the 340 would be my choice, too. I tremble at the 440's mpgs....
  • fintailfintail Posts: 32,887
    Could those be had with a slant 6?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,577
    According to my old car book the lesser Chargers came with a slant six, which had 105 hp. But the SE came standard with a 318.

    I know it sounds sad, something that big having just a slant six standard, but that was par for the course in those days. FWIW, the 1973 Chevelle came standard with a 110 hp 250-6. However, the Monte Carlo, which the Charger SE nominally competed with, had a 145 hp 350.

    The Ford Torino that year had a ~137 hp 302 standard, but a 92 hp 250-6 was a credit option, apparently. I guess the Gran Torino formal hardtop coupe would've competed with the Charger SE. It was a bit cheaper, $3154 versus $3375 for the Charger SE. A Monte Carlo started at $3415 for the cheapest Sport Coupe, but the more popular S and Landau were $3562 and $3806, respectively.

    I guess the Charger SE should still get some credit for trying to pull off that sporty, musclecar look. In contrast, the Torino and Monte Carlo were going for that full-blown, pimpy, personal luxury coupe style. To be fair though, that's what the people wanted in those days.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,067
    Do you recall that black 1973 Chevrolet Bel Air at Carlisle that only had a 250 inline six? That motor must've had to work mighty hard to move that mass!
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    I think that by 1973, the difference in value among the V8s would not be very great---probably the 340 would be top dog but it would be neck and neck with the higher HP big blocks.

    The only way to get a lot of value out of a '73 Charger would be, ironically, to modify it with a "real" engine that could put out serious horsepower.
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,023
    The only way to get a lot of value out of a '73 Charger would be, ironically, to modify it with a "real" engine that could put out serious horsepower.

    That is exactly what I was thinking, you certainly couldn't hurt its value by replacing the original engine. Actually, if that car checks out and looks good you could drop in a nice Hemi crate engine, maybe retrofit A/C (if it didn't have it) and have a nice cruiser for maybe 10-12K.

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    Oh you would definitely increase value by replacing the original boat anchor engine.

    I'd opt for a beefy 440, maybe a 6 pak. Hemis are very nasty engines to drive around on the street. They don't idle well, they overheat.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,577
    Do you recall that black 1973 Chevrolet Bel Air at Carlisle that only had a 250 inline six? That motor must've had to work mighty hard to move that mass!

    Yeah, I remember it vaguely. Did it have a manual or automatic, or do you remember? One dog that always sticks in my mind was a 1977 Cutlass Supreme sedan that CR tested, with a 260 V-8. 0-60 came up in around 21.6 seconds! It was in a comparison with a Caprice with a 305, an LTD-II with a 302, and either a Fury or Monaco with a 318. The other cars, while no powerhouses themselves, were at least good for 0-60 in about 13 seconds.

    That Bel Air, if it had a manual, might have been slightly quicker than the Cutlass. I believe the Cutlass had a/c as well, which would slow it down. And by that time, the midsized cars got so heavy that a V-8 '77 Cutlass Supreme probably weight about as much as 6-cyl '73 Chevy! Even though the Cutlass just had a 260, it probably didn't weigh much less than one with a 403 would have.
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,423
    "Hemis are very nasty engines to drive around on the street. They don't idle well, they overheat. "

    Not THAT Hemi, THIS "Hemi":
    image
  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    that's worth more than the freakin' car! :surprise:

    long block + engine management system + lotsa $$$ labor
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,423
    "that's worth more than the freakin' car!"

    Oh, yeah. But it'd be a fun project, just resign myself to $0.25 on the dollar...maybe...
  • tjc78tjc78 JerseyPosts: 5,023
    that's worth more than the freakin' car!

    long block + engine management system + lotsa $$$ labor


    Find a wrecked newer 300C, swap it all over. Done! Weekend job! ;)

    1999 Chevy S10 / 2004 Merc Grand Marquis / 2012 Buick LaCrosse

  • MrShift@EdmundsMrShift@Edmunds Posts: 43,632
    one of those 20-day weekends maybe.

    Let's see--what would one have to do?

    1. Get used engine and engine management system
    2. Prepare/fabricate motor mounts
    3. Fabricate cooling system
    4. Adapt to Tremec 5-speed
    5. fabricate drive shaft
    6. splice engine management computer and harness into existing wiring
    7. Install custom gas tank and fuel pump
    8. Fabricate custom exhaust
    9. Fabricate gauge pack/sensors
    10. install clutch pedal assembly
    11 install hydraulic clutch system

    so, that takes care of the first day ! :P
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