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Project Cars--You Get to Vote on "Hold 'em or Fold 'em"

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  • gsemikegsemike Long Island, NYPosts: 1,778
  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,980
    That Suburban is kind of cool. Of course, it needs a restore, and I doubt you can get out for less than 50K based on the condition it is in, so talke about being buried.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's) and 2007 Volvo S40 (mine)

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,974
    People seem proud of their Impalas there. The 61 might be the least harmful deal.

    W108 looks really nice, but they bring more like 7-8K-ish even in great condition. It's also a carb (base 108) model, which some like, some don't.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    The MB 250 is about 300% over book.

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,536
    As for street rods, I'm not sure any street rod in history ever made a profit, aside from the "period rods" built in the 50s by famous builders, or maybe some of the famous salt flats racers.

    There is a show where they do exactly that (buy junkers, make them into rods, and sell them at auction), and if you believe the numbers, they make a profit just about every time. Oh, actually, there are a few shows now that I think about it. The first ... I can't remember what its called... I'm not even sure they are making new shows anymore. They seem to be out in the southwest somewhere. The 2nd is that show that started last year about Gas Monkey Garage. And then there is Counting Cars.

    With all those shows, I usually have a hard time believing the numbers, especially Counting Cars. I've seen him buy a car for $5k, spend weeks on it, give it a full interior and paint job, and sell it at $15k "for a profit." Hmmm...

    '13 Stang GT; '15 Fit; '98 Volvo S70; '14 Town&Country

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,980
    I am addicted to Speed and Velocity and the car shows, and "counting cars" does not ring a bell.

    But the ones I do watch seem to be a stretch. Almost like wheeler dealers, where they don't add in the cost of labor!

    Texas car wars is a new one, and those costs for what they do have to be bogus. Desert Valley (not sure the actual name) was the same deal, though they did pick there parts from the yard mostly. Still, the $ did not make sense when you counted man hours, though I guess if you have guys in the shop getting paid $10 it could!

    The other older series was "rags to riches" (I think) at Barry's speed shop. I did like the "spendometer", and that one actually seemed legit, because they claimed to spend some serious coin on a few of those builds.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's) and 2007 Volvo S40 (mine)

  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,118
    IMO, all of those shows are garbage. They are all scripted and bear no relation to anyone's "reality" except the producers.

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • michaellnomichaellno Posts: 4,300
    There is a show where they do exactly that (buy junkers, make them into rods, and sell them at auction), and if you believe the numbers, they make a profit just about every time.

    I believe it's called "Fast and Loud", and, like "Wheeler Dealers", I suspect they don't factor in any cost for labor.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    edited March 2013
    Something is definitely not right with those shows---either they are faking it (often happens on Reality shows), or not counting labor, or, even more likely, the actual quality of the work is down and dirty--- a TV camera can make a real turd look great from 10 feet away. You won't see body filler, overspray, cheap chrome work, file marks, cheesy materials in carpets and upholstery, or all the things not working in the rod.

    I could show you photos of cars I have inspected that look great but are utter disasters when you look underneath or actually try to drive them.

    Building rat rods is fine but don't call them 'restorations'.

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,536
    Yeah, that one with the spendometer was the first one I was thinking of. They do claim the labor is in there and the spends are pretty high. So he'll spend something like $45k and get $50k at auction. Of course, if they were to subtract the transportation costs and auction fees...

    Counting Cars is the one that is a spinoff from Pawn Stars on History Channel. It is about the guy who usually does their appraisals at the pawn shop. I think it is an entertaining show and he is quite a character... but the numbers make no sense.

    '13 Stang GT; '15 Fit; '98 Volvo S70; '14 Town&Country

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,536
    To each his own.

    As for the scripting ... eh. I don't watch it for the drama personally, although that's probably what drives viewership. For us gearheads, we watch to see what cars they dig up and what they do to them. Wheeler Dealers is definitely the most technical of the bunch.

    '13 Stang GT; '15 Fit; '98 Volvo S70; '14 Town&Country

  • stickguystickguy Posts: 14,980
    I am not a techie in any sense, but I have done stuff on my cars and know a fair amount, and have to say that I learned quite a bit from old Edd China on that show. I like the way he explains and shows what he is doing.

    2013 Acura RDX (wife's) and 2007 Volvo S40 (mine)

  • jpp5862jpp5862 NCPosts: 358
    Remind me, what year is your fintail?
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    Oh I think they know what they're doing, for sure--I was just questioning how it plays out in TV land.

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  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,974
    It's a 64, which is later run for a 220SE. So, I get dual circuit discs and a 4 speed auto. My car also has the earlier style round horn ring steering wheel, so it's the best of both worlds.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,974
    The only American-based classic car show I've found I can tolerate is Chasing Classic Cars - Wayne Carini seems very honest, and he has good taste. The other more dramatic ones really seem scripted.

    Wheeler Dealers is fantastic, I can watch it for hours. Edd is a good combination of skilled and patient, and Mike is a superdork - but not an unlikeable one, he has enthusiasm. If Edd's labor was billed at a market rate, he'd be a millionaire.
  • omarmanomarman Posts: 715
    edited March 2013
    What a thing to preserve/restore. At first glance it reminded me of the plain white Ohio Highway Patrol Impalas from that era but it's actually just a low option 307 sedan.

    Not my favorite color, but this 1970 Custom Impala was probably one of the best Detroit battleships around back then. For some reason my eyes were drawn to the fender mount turn signal indicators. I don't recall seeing them on big Chevys but by 1970 the options and accessories were growing for these things like the bulk and weight.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,054
    That '70 Impala looks like a really nice car for $5,000. I can even deal with the color, as IMO at least, that's one of the more tasteful shades of green I've seen from that era. My grandparents' '72 Impala was similar, but I think its green was a bit darker.

    My grandparents also had a '68 Impala, but it had a 327. I don't remember it very well. They gave it to my Mom in '72 when they bought their new Impala, and she traded it when I was 5, for a '75 LeMans. I remember it being a vibrant, colorful bluish-green color, but I was looking through some old photos over the weekend and found some where it was in the background, and it appeared to be more of a dull grayish-green.
  • ab348ab348 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, CanadaPosts: 2,118
    Personally I like the '67/'68 generation better than the '69/'70, but all are preferred for me to the later versions that were just too bulky. We had a '69 when I was a kid and the interior was pretty disappointing. The dash just wasn't as good as the earlier models. Ours was very softly sprung and really wallowed badly - in fact that was a big part of why we got rid of it. It was a Sport Coupe, Butternut yellow with a black vinyl interior.

    Given they sold so many of them, it's not surprising that you see a lot of these '70's still at shows and the like. There is one locally that is an all-original survivor car, carfully preserved, but with a most unfortunate color combo - a tomato-red paint job with a black vinyl top and gold cloth interior. Ordered that way new by the guy who still owns it.

    This one may have been "professionally restored", but is that white piping I see on the seats? And why a junky aftermarket air cleaner? Throw that away.

    2011 Buick Regal Turbo, 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass S Holiday Coupe

  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,974
    That 1970 does look like a good deal, and is a good representation of how cars really were in the day. For 5K, not a bad driver.

    The 68 - if I want a mint low mileage car, I want it to be original - if not, the mileage isn't worth much.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,054
    I just noticed that '70 Impala doesn't have air conditioning. Still, seems like a nice car otherwise. And in my case, none of my old cars have functional a/c anyway, so I wouldn't know the difference. :P
  • hpmctorquehpmctorque Posts: 4,231
    A lot of people, especially in the northern states, chose to not add A/C on Chevys, Fords and Plymouths in those days, even on Impalas, Galaxies and Fury IIIs. As one might expect, factory A/C was more common on mid-priced brands, but it largely depended on where you lived. My parents, who lived in Wisconsin, bought a new '57 New Yorker, which they traded for a '63 Dynamic 88. Neither had A/C. Most didn't in the Upper Midwest, in those days.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    AC is a big plus on classic cars these days. Worth a good 5% to 10% of total value.

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  • gsemikegsemike Long Island, NYPosts: 1,778
    My first car was a 73 Charger

    A little short on details but what do you think?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,054
    I never liked that rear quarter window treatment, as I prefer a true hardtop where there's a choice. Still, from what little I can tell in the pics, looks like it could be a nice car.

    It would be nice if the seller had listed which engine it has. According to my old car book, the Charger SE has a standard V-8, so at the least, it has the 150 hp 318. It also lists a 240 hp 340, a 175 hp 400, a 260 hp 400, and even a 280 hp 440. My guess is that the vast majority just had the 318 or the 175 hp 400. But by now, who knows, it might have been hopped up.
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,279
    Not enough details. It's a '73, so outside the 'desirability zone' for muscle cars, and if it's a small block and if it has a few needs, then the price is just about market correct.

    If it were a very clean small block inside and out, say a #3 car (clean daily driver) there could be some money left on the table here.

    But if there's some minor rust, or ripped upholstery, or missing parts, or bad body work, then the car is worth no more than he's asking.

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,054
    If that car just had the run-of-the-mill, 175 hp 400, would it be worth much more than the 150 hp 318?

    And, how would the 240 hp 340 stack up against the 260 hp 400 or 280 hp 440 for value? I wonder if the 340 might actually be the better choice, since it would be lighter than the big-blocks, but still has a lot of hp? I guess the 400 and 440 would out-torque it by a wide margin, though?
  • texasestexases Posts: 5,647
    If I really wanted a Charger, I'd save up for an earlier one. But if it was a '73, the 340 would be my choice, too. I tremble at the 440's mpgs....
  • fintailfintail Posts: 33,974
    Could those be had with a slant 6?
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,054
    According to my old car book the lesser Chargers came with a slant six, which had 105 hp. But the SE came standard with a 318.

    I know it sounds sad, something that big having just a slant six standard, but that was par for the course in those days. FWIW, the 1973 Chevelle came standard with a 110 hp 250-6. However, the Monte Carlo, which the Charger SE nominally competed with, had a 145 hp 350.

    The Ford Torino that year had a ~137 hp 302 standard, but a 92 hp 250-6 was a credit option, apparently. I guess the Gran Torino formal hardtop coupe would've competed with the Charger SE. It was a bit cheaper, $3154 versus $3375 for the Charger SE. A Monte Carlo started at $3415 for the cheapest Sport Coupe, but the more popular S and Landau were $3562 and $3806, respectively.

    I guess the Charger SE should still get some credit for trying to pull off that sporty, musclecar look. In contrast, the Torino and Monte Carlo were going for that full-blown, pimpy, personal luxury coupe style. To be fair though, that's what the people wanted in those days.
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