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2009 Toyota Corolla

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Comments

  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    OK to be precise... Of the vehicles listed none except the Civic come within 7.4% City and 5.4% Highway, with some of them well over 10% worse in fuel economy.

    Corolla.... 27 C / 35 H .... Segment leader in fuel economy
    Civic....... 25 / 36 .... - 7.4% / + 2.9% than the Corolla
    Sentra.... 25 / 33 .... - 7.4% / - 5.7% than the Corolla
    Maz3..... 23 / 31 .... -14.8% / -11.4% than the Corolla
    Elantra... 25 / 33 .... - 7.4% / - 5.7% than the Corolla
    Focus.... 24 / 33 .... -11.1% / - 5.7% than the Corolla
    Cobalt.... 22 / 31 ..... -18.5% / -11.4 % than the Corolla
  • jaxs1jaxs1 Posts: 2,697
    The car is driven conservatively during the EPA tests and it doesn't get the same EPA ratings.
    There is no reason for the EPA tests to have been biased against the XRS when it was tested exactly the same as the 1.8s were.
  • The car is driven conservatively during the EPA tests and it doesn't get the same EPA ratings.
    There is no reason for the EPA tests to have been biased against the XRS when it was tested exactly the same as the 1.8s were.


    I wasn't saying that the EPA tests are biased against the XRS or that there was any difference in how the two engines were tested.

    What I was saying was that the EPA's testing system changed for the 2008 model year. The EPA estimates for the '08 Corolla are lower than they were for the '07 model and it's exactly the same engine.

    I would personally expect to beat the EPA estimates obtained with the new method with either engine. I hope to see 40 MPG on highway runs in my '09 Corolla with the 1.8. I'm guessing that 35 MPG isn't out of the question with the 2.4 if one isn't punchy with the right foot. :)
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,687
    "Well... call me weird but since I know where I can get a car that has a lot more power, better fuel economy, much larger and classier interior, a smooth and quiet ride, all at a lower price than the XRS, I won't be going to the box office for that XRS ticket anytime soon"

    Backy, I suspect you are referring to the Sonata, but then you are talking about a bigger clumsier car with another 300 pounds on it, just like the Camry LE is. The people I am referring to, the folks who want the big-engined version of the Corolla, PREFER either the smaller size or the lower weight of the Corolla with that big engine.

    Obviously, if they also want superlative handling and responsive steering, not to mention a nicer interior, they have the Mazda3s to turn to....or the Civic SI....or heck the GTI at this pricetag.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • mackabeemackabee Posts: 4,709
    The engine in the 09 is NOT the same as the one in the 08. EPA testing is now more real world driving than before. There's nothing conservative about it.
    Mack
  • The engine in the 09 is NOT the same as the one in the 08. EPA testing is now more real world driving than before. There's nothing conservative about it.

    I know the 09 engine isn't the same. I know the EPA testing has changed and that it's generally lowered the reported averages of everything. On an anecdotal basis, I've seen reports that real world averages are probably going to be better than the "new" EPA estimates. So, I still expect fuel economy of the '09 1.8 to be comparable to the fuel economy of the previous generation 1.8 in the Corolla.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    Yes, there are many excellent alternatives to the XRS at its price levels. Some are about the same size/weight as the XRS, some are larger.

    But since I haven't driven the Sonata SE yet or the XRS for that matter, I hesitate to say one is "clumsier" than the other.

    And the GTI is not a lightweight car...
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    Corolla.... 27 C / 35 H .... Segment leader in fuel economy

    Actually, it looks like the Corolla is tied for segment leadership in FE with the Versa CVT (both at 27 mpg), and the Civic is the segment leader in highway FE (36 mpg vs. 25 for Corolla). Still, fuel economy is perhaps the Corolla 1.8's biggest plus--along with the quiet interior and big trunk for this class.
  • roxy11roxy11 Posts: 27
    versa w/cvt epa is 27/33
    corolla epa is 27/35
    civic at epa is 25/36

    corolla is tied on city, better on highway than versa, so not really a tie overall.
    corolla is 2 mpg better than civic in city, 1 less on highway, so a tie at best or maybe edge to corolla.

    of course theres epa and there is real world. the nissan versa is struggling in real world mpg, much like the dodge caliber(no surprise there).

    i can honestly say, of any corolla owner i know personally(total of 6 people-no not a huge sample) none of them fails to achieve the OLD epa estimates of 30/38 auto (4 of them) and 32/41 w/the manual.(2 people). this doesnt include myself. i generally got 38-42 with 65-75% hwy driving with an 05 manual.

    maybe its all in my head, but many honda and toyota drivers have always seemed to exceed the old epa numbers, so for us the new epa numbers are laughable. im going to be patient on the 09 corolla though, as it is heavier and the engine is a bit different. i will not purchase one until i see a good sampling of real word numbers, particularly with the manual.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    Right, I meant to say "city" wrt the Versa being tied with the Corolla. Thanks for the catch.
  • lls57lls57 Posts: 57
    I've got just over 1,000 miles on my 09 Corolla, mostly city (suburb) driving. I'm getting 32 mpg (calculated) so far, so I'm pleased.
  • thaipthaip Posts: 32
    I just picked up my Corolla LE on Sunday. I drove for 250 miles and I only needed like over a little bit of 7 gallons. That is approx 36 miles per gallon. I am happy with it on the first trip out of the dealer.

    Normally, the mpg will improve after like 1000 miles on the car. That was exactly what happened to my 07 Camry Hybrid. Therefore, I hope it will do the same for my Corolla?
  • thaipthaip Posts: 32
    The one thing I don't like about the 09 Corolla is its brakes. When you are braking it, it feels like you have to press it all the way down to the floor! What is up with that Corolla? Anyway, overall, I love my corolla LE

    Second, if you purchased your car from other state with a temp tag and when you go to register it in your own state, which milage will the DMV record for your title? Is it the number of miles stated on the bill of sale or the actual milage on the Odommeter?

    thanks
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,667
    Miles on bill of sale. I have done the same thing.
  • thaipthaip Posts: 32
    thanks mcdawqq

    that what I thought also, but just want to be sure. Logically speaking, it should be the miles on the bill of sale. You could say that your car got shipped over:):).
  • thaipthaip Posts: 32
    thanks,

    did you have to wait something call the "certificate of origin" or the title that send to you from the dealer before you can go to the DMV to do your registration? If you did, then how long does your dealer take to send out the certificate of origin to you? My was fritzmall and they said that it going to take 10 to 14 days.
  • cz75cz75 Posts: 210
    They may be beating it in sales, but every comparison of the old Corolla and the current or even the last gen Civic, pretty much put it last or nearly last with regard to its driving dynamics. Persons buying the Corolla probably view driving as a chore and buy cars like appliances.

    I should also note, as others have, that Toyota has a much larger fleet presence than Honda, which I can attest to, seeing businesses and rental companies use the Corolla. Conversely, my local commuter airport uses the Civic as a security car, which may be the first Civic I've ever seen in commercial use (I do see Elements used for delivery vehicles). This tells me that there may be more people who, when spending their own money choose the Civic. Ford, with the Taurus, was for years America's best selling car, and that surely wasn't because it was the best car or that more people choose it for a POV - it was all about how many rental companies, businesses, and government agencies bought a domestic vehicle for fleet use.

    I'm not trying to be too critical of the Corolla and think it would be a good vehicle if they dropped the price a couple thousand and/or put some more feature content into it. Toyota has for years traded off its name and its perceived reliability advantage, but I'm not even sure that exists anymore, with the faults Toyota has been having with its vehicles for the past five or so years. Honda is now pretty much confirmed to build a better car if Consumer Reports is to be believed and I wonder what that will spell for Toyota's small car sales dominance, even among appliance buyers.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    I'd modify your evaluation in saying that the quality of the content of some of the features could be improved ( but again at what price ).

    However the actual content is far far far superior to any other Corolla ever put on the road here in the US. So that can't be a serious issue. There is no comparison between this Gen and any going before it. This one wins hands down.

    As to pricing. You suggest a price reduction of a 'couple of thousand'. HUH? It has as much or more than any of the other basic econo-cars and all of them are priced within $600 of each other ( link here )....excluding the Elantra for the time being. Why in the world would the vehicle with the most content and best fuel economy be priced $2000 lower than the others? Reality Check time here.

    One other HUGE factor that we 'know' but don't 'see', but which the vehicle makers know and see is that this subsegment of the market is on the verge of going through the roof. We 'know' that fuel is getting really expensive, we sense it every day. But beyond that it doesn't mean much...unless you're in the vehicle making / selling business and a HUGE tsunami of buyers is about to hit. With $4 fuel are buyers going to buy Tahoes and Sequoias or Prius' and Corollas ( and Civics, 3s, Elantras, Focuses, Sentras, Versas, Yaris', etc etc etc )? All these models should benefit handsomely.

    From direct experience buyers coming out of $38000 SUVs wanting a more efficient vehicle that gets better than 100% improvement in fuel economy are not going to quibble over $200 or $400 one way or another. That amount is meaningless.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    However the actual content is far far far superior to any other Corolla ever put on the road here in the US. So that can't be a serious issue.

    I have to disagree with that as a general statement. IMO the interior of the last gen Corolla was superior to that of the 2009 model. In terms of powertrain, I don't see any big advantage that the 2009 1.8L has over the 2008 powertrain except for a few more ponies, which are used up by the extra weight. The 2009 does have more standard safety features (finally!) and some options the 2008 didn't have such as Bluetooth and factory nav, but as you like to say, at what cost?

    Why in the world would the vehicle with the most content and best fuel economy be priced $2000 lower than the others?

    Most content? Hardly. "Best" fuel economy? Not quite. Tied in city mpg with the Versa (at a considerably lower price) and bested in highway mpg by the Civic. But as you say, the Corolla will probably sell in big numbers if only because of its high fuel economy--coupled with the Toyota logo on the trunk.
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,667
    Yes, I had to wait about 10 days for mine before I could go to the BMV.
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