Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





2009 Toyota Corolla

11415171920103

Comments

  • If you analize the design strategy from Japanese market Engineers, you will see a Yaris 2006 like a corolla 2003-2007 body box, and for me, the new corolla 2008 will be a cross design between the Camry 2006 and the lexus IS 350, 2006, a litle more agressive exterior design, maybe 2.4 VVTI engine with 150-160 HP, and 5 speed automatic transmission,a new interior design, and maybe an Hybrid Option. Maybe Xenon Ligths. But still Keep looking more conservative than the competition. This is my vision to 2008 corolla design.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,695
    DO bring a 2.4L sport model, it had better have AT LEAST 170 hp. Both from the POV of competing in the market (where many other carmakers' sport compact models have 170 hp or well over in most cases) and also because the existing engine in the Camry makes almost 160 hp - I would expect to see that boosted a little for an all-new model.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • Seems odd to me that they would go "back to the drawing board" and come out of those meetings with a design that is a cross between the Yaris and Camry. Wouldn't it make more logical sense for THAT to have been the original design idea all along anyway? Makes me wonder what the original design was, if that is truly the case.
  • The thought of putting a 2.4L engine in the Corolla is not that far-fetched. The rumor mill in Japan says that the Blade, to be released in Japan in January 2007 and which is a twin of the Auris, a wide-body hatchback based on the next-gen Corolla slated to be released next month (JDM), will have a 2.4L option. The Blade/Auris is really the Corolla liftback, designed to compete with the likes of the Mazda3. The Auris will first be introduced JDM with 1.5 and 1.8. But if the rumor in Japan is correct, Toyota is thinking about a bigger engine for at least one of the future Corolla derivatives.
  • Hello Partners I will be in my vacation in Zurich, for 3 weeks and one week 14-23 oct 2006 in New York, please tell about any Motor Show near these dates and the location, please so maybe I will find somo corolla prototype with any luck.
    Regards :) I heard about the Jacob Javit Center in NY???
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Again the 'back to the drawing board' was the interpretation of some analysts when the Civic came out. All along Toyota has said otherwise.

    Yes I think that the original vehicle always has been a 'baby Camry'. It always has been that way.
  • dudleyrdudleyr Posts: 3,456
    I just don't get the whole bigger is better mentality in a Corolla. We are just coming off $3.00 gasoline. How about a smaller engine in the Corolla. A 1.6 should do just fine.
  • mcdawggmcdawgg Posts: 1,668
    Well, take a look at the values of most people in our country. Most people "must" have huge houses, cars (or SUVs and trucks), TVs, etc., and they must have large engines in those cars! Our society is VERY materialistic!!
  • dudleyrdudleyr Posts: 3,456
    You can be materialistic and efficient at the same time. In Europe you can get a BMW with a 1.6 liter engine.

    You are right though - we buy cars on image not what they do. Even today most adds state the HP even before the name of the vehicle. "intoducing the new 300 hp model x"

    Still makes me ashamed. We are pawns of media.
  • >>I just don't get the whole bigger is better mentality in a Corolla. We are just coming off $3.00 gasoline. How about a smaller engine in the Corolla. A 1.6 should do just fine.

    If not 1.6, I feel that the current 1.8 is just fine for the Corolla. Because it is a boring engine in a boring car, no one pays much attention to it, but that ZZ-FE 1.8L engine is a masterpiece. It has a good usable torque band that stretches very nicely, revs freely with its low friction characteristics, and as a result, gets an excellent mileage as well. For a car of the Corolla's size, you really don't need anything bigger. In Japan, in fact, 1.5 is the standard issue engine for the Corolla. That'd be underpowered in the NA market, but 1.8 is plenty, in my opinion.
  • I've gotten my '97 corolla with the 1.6 liter engine (and somewhere between 90 and 95 ponies) up to approx. 120 mph before.....so, to me, underpowered isn't a word I would use to describe it.

    For me, anything more than 1.8L with 130 or so horses is just overkill in this class (and I'm only going that high because the current generation is about 300 lbs heavier than my '97).
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,695
    Yes, but what if the next-gen is 500 pounds more than your '97 (as it is very likely to be)?

    If it gains 10% in weight, should it gain 10% in power to match? Or should the next car be slower to increase fuel economy. This question is rhetorical, BTW, there is certainly no "right answer". I wish for a little slower and a LOT easier on gas for the base model (and whatever for the sport model - I mean, sport models need more power, that's their purpose), but alas, it is unlikely Toyota will do that. The best we can hope for is just as speedy as the current model and a big bump in fuel economy, and what is most likely is speedier and just a small bump in fuel economy. :-(

    Maybe they should start offering three trims - regular, economy, and sport. The economy could have the 1.5 instead of the 1.8. 50 mpg would be worth being the slowest up the freeway ramp! :-)

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • Yes, but what if the next-gen is 500 pounds more than your '97 (as it is very likely to be)?

    read my post again. I allowed for over a thirty percent increase in power over my '97 (with a 10-20 percent increase in weight, as you anticipate as well) and said anything over THAT would be overkill. So, even if it does get heavier, the added power that a 130 hp engine would give would still give it a much better power to weight ratio than I have in my '97....which is more than adequate for pretty much all uses of a car in this class.

    Sad part is, with current technology, a 1.5 liter engine in a Corolla, even if it does increase in size, would still give it the capability to go faster than my '97 (which is certainly fast enough to break speeding laws with the best of them).....so no need to worry about being the slowest up any on-ramps. We've gotten waaaaay too spoiled with cars with more horsepower than we could ever use.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,695
    Toyotas's own 1.5 is currently rated at 106 hp in the new Yaris. Say they manage to boost that to 115 while increasing mpg at the same time, you could be looking at a Corolla that makes a solid 40-45 round-town mpg while still not being embarassed on the road, although without making gearing a lot shorter than it is now, it would be one of the slowest cars in its class. That power to weight ratio is only a bit better than the last-gen Jetta, which was a bit of a dog (AND got lowish gas mileage - go figure!),and that VW 2.0 was torquier than the Toyota 1.5 is.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • dudleyrdudleyr Posts: 3,456
    I used to have a first gen Odyssey minivan. 3,500 lbs and a lot of air to push with only 140 hp. It did fine cruising at 80 mph with a full load and A/C running. Even took it over the rockies - yes it had to downshift, but it maintained the speed limit.

    The current Corolla is a rocket compared to that car, and that car was more than adequate.

    Slow is a 52 hp VW bus, not a 100+ hp small car.

    A 4-cyl Accord with a stick is faster than some model years of the Corvette, yet some people think it is a dog and requires the V-6. I still remember the cover of one of the car mags from a while back describing the 6.9 liter MB as the fastest Sedan on the planet at 140 mph and 0-60 in 7.5 seconds. They went on and on about the rush of power. Now a stock Passat with the 4-cyl engine can match those numbers. Why does everything need to be so fast now?

    I just don't get it. How did the marketing types brainwash so many of us?

    My guess is the dirty little secret that the cars with the best efficiency are the cheapest (and lowest profit). Manual tranny is cheaper, fewer options means less weight and better mpg, smaller base engines are more efficient. Car companies want to upsell and make more profit, that is whey they are developing platforms like the Prius to showcase economy - at a price.

    I don't think the new Corolla will be much more efficient if any because they want the prius to stand out as the leader.
  • >>My guess is the dirty little secret that the cars with the best efficiency are the cheapest (and lowest profit). Manual tranny is cheaper, fewer options means less weight and better mpg, smaller base engines are more efficient. Car companies want to upsell and make more profit, that is whey they are developing platforms like the Prius to showcase economy - at a price.

    I tend to agree with you in most aspects in this thread, but have to disagree when you say that the cars with the best efficiency are the cheapest. The stripped down cars with less weight theoretically get a better mileage not because they are efficient but simply because that's the law of physics: less weight, less energy to propel them. To me, an efficient car is one that is equipped the same or similarly to and weighs as much as another vehicle and yet burns less fuel. That kind of technology is hugely expensive to develop. Considering that, the Prius is an absolute bargain basement case at $22k or so.

    Make no mistake - I do not care for the horsepower craze, often hyped by those car magazines which seem to believe that the best cars are the ones that end up helping the OPEC most. But since the reality is that the car buying public in most developed contries today could not be convinced to all switch to the Geo Metro or Smart For Two that simply go by the law of physics, we need car makers to work on the efficiency. In this aspect, Toyota is the clear leader right now.

    Oh, by the way, if between the two, Toyota would so much rather sell more Corollas than the Prius. The Corolla is a money maker, a profit-generating machine for Toyota. The Prius, on the other hand, makes pratically no money, if not generating losses (they were in the first generation), for Toyota.
  • nippononlynippononly SF Bay AreaPosts: 12,695
    Prius is on a collision course with a real problem - the revised EPA fuel economy test for hybrids. When its rating is reduced to 45/40, the fuel economy ceiling at Toyota will be low for all the other models to get under. I think they will switch to promoting gee-whiz new technologies in the Prius, as opposed to just pushing its fuel efficiency all the time. Which will allow models like Corolla, which is a much more basic car than Prius, to really excel in fuel economy, if they can manage it.

    But if Toyota of the last 30 years is anything to judge by, increasing fuel economy will not be their top priority. The Corolla has stood pat in power for the last what, nine years? I am all for that if the fuel economy jumps way up, as it did in 1998 and 2003, but I think the next round will be like the last Camry update - more power with just a slight boost in fuel economy. Pity.

    2013 Civic SI, 2009 Outback Sport 5-spd (stick)

  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Oh, by the way, if between the two, Toyota would so much rather sell more Corollas than the Prius. The Corolla is a money maker, a profit-generating machine for Toyota. The Prius, on the other hand, makes pratically no money, if not generating losses (they were in the first generation), for Toyota.

    This is why I too agree that the changes will be incremental rather than significant. With the Corolla's current volume at about 400,000 units annually and two very efficient plants if Toyota only makes 5-10% on the wholesale prices the bottom line is still $400 Million in profits - every year.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    It probable that the new ratings next year will show significant differences in the window stickers.

    Estimates ( new EPA's vs current )
    Gen 2 Prius - 47 mpg combined vs 55 mpg combined
    Gen 3 Prius - 57 mpg combined ( ???? )
    Corolla - 31 mpg combined vs 35 mpg combined
    Camry 4c - 25 mpg combined vs 28 mpg combined
    Camry hybrid - 36 mpg combined vs 39 mpg combined
    ( My feeling from driving the new TCH and comparing it to the sticker is that Toyota has already implemented the new EPA criteria on this new vehicle so it will have only a small effect on the TCH. Protecting the Camry's image is key. )

    One's personal driving characteristics of course may make all of this subject to conditions. On my personal daily drive in moderate weather I can get
    32 mpg all day long in any 4c Camry
    40 mpg all day long in any Corolla
    51 mpg all day long in any Prius

    My personal drive will allow me to exceed the likely EPA estimates by 10%. This will become commonplace now as many many drivers will be able to state that they exceed the new EPA sticker numbers.
  • dudleyrdudleyr Posts: 3,456
    The prius may not be making much money now, but Toyota plans for far in the future. They are setting up fuel economy as premium feature. Eventually the Prius will make plenty of money (along with other hybrids). It certainly makes money for the dealers.

    To sort of stay on track my biggest hope for the new Corolla is a true stationwagon version. Unfortunately this will not happen for similar reasons. SUV's cost more and make more profit. If you want the space you need to buy an SUV. A corolla wagon might take sales away from higher profit SUV's.

    I don't buy the excuse that wagons have not sold well in the past - they have never marketed them. When they sold the Corolla wagon, there was barely a picture of the wagon in the brochure, much less any mention in print or TV ads. Look at Subaru, the Legacy/Outback wagon outsells the sedan 10 to 1 because it is marketed that way.

    BTW by efficiency I was not specifically refering to the engine, but to the fuel mileage, where the least expensive model of most cars gets the best mileage.
  • >>Eventually the Prius will make plenty of money (along with other hybrids). It certainly makes money for the dealers.

    I agree. What Toyota is doing is to use the hybrid technology in as many models as practical in order to spread the cost of the technology investment. That way the Prius will not have to be the only model with a mission to amortize it (of course, this is already happening with other hybrid models in place). That will eventually lower the cost on the Prius and other hybrid-equipped Toyotas and yield a better bottom line.

    Even then, though, the ROI of the Corolla is absolutely amazing, and it is a difficult little wagon to get off when it makes you so much money. In one way, it is precisely because a car like the Corolla is so profitable that Toyota can afford to put so much emphasis on the hybrid technology.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    Will the new Corolla be longer then the old one, or about the same? I like the Honda Fit because it's 157" vs 178" of the Corolla and the Fit has more interior space. Easier to put in my garage.
  • The only information that I have is for the JDM Corolla, which, according to reliable sources, WILL have different dimensions from the non-JDM Corolla. So what is written below is just a reference.

    Using the information that I have, the next-gen JDM Corolla will be identical in length and width as the current generation, and the height will go down, but only by 10 mm. The wheelbase will remain unchanged as well.

    The non-JDM Corolla will become WIDER than the current generation, but I have no data as to by how much. Also as to the length, I have no reliable information at this time.
  • Am I in a wrong forum or what!!!!!!!
  • It's official now. The all-new Corolla (JDM body) will be released in Japan on October 10. Why October 10? Because it's the 10th generation Corolla. Seriously.

    The next-gen Corolla liftback, the Auris, should also be released at the same time.
  • So when will the next generation Corolla come out in the United States. I have heard that the Corolla will be delayed till late 07 as a 08 model
  • Toyota has been extremely tight-lipped about the non-JDM Corolla in all aspects, including the release date. What we do know now is that there will be differently-sized sedan bodies for JDM and non-JDM (first ever in the history of Corolla), although no one seems to know for sure whether the difference is in the dimensions only, or also in the body style. There was a presentation in Japan by the executive chief engineer for the Corolla project earlier this month, but he said nothing specific about the NA Corolla.
  • Do you believe Toyota will reveal the new Corolla at the 2007 Autoshow. Also people say that the Toyota Auris is supposed to be a concept model of what the Corolla may look like.
  • Do you believe Toyota will reveal the new Corolla at the 2007 Autoshow

    Possible. But I am not sure at which one.

    Also people say that the Toyota Auris is supposed to be a concept model of what the Corolla may look like.

    Yes, there have been suggestions that the Auris may possibly represent the shape of the non-JDM Corolla. The Auris is based on the next-gen Corolla platform, and in Japan it replaces the Corolla Runx liftback model. The Auris will definitely be available in Europe, and over there it may actually end up being named the Corolla. That leaves the Americas. I strongly doubt that Toyota will go only with the liftback body like the Auris' when it comes to the Americas. The Auris body may become available in NA either as a Corolla variant or a separate model, but is not likely to be THE Corolla. Woud the Corolla of the Americas look like the JDM Corolla, but with different body dimensions, or totally different from the JDM? No one outside of Toyota seems to know at this time. I will keep on checking.
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Some people in Canada ( plant personnel ) and some dealers have actually seen the new Corolla as a ready for production vehicle. But Toyota is sure keeping a tight grip on information.

    It's similar to the info on the engine specs of the new 5.7L Tundra. People have seen it and driven it but noone is letting anything leak out.
Sign In or Register to comment.