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Ultimate AWD Sports Sedans

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  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,206
    Did you by any chance try the G35X and/or S60R?

    For me, it came down to those 2 and the 330i. But, like you, I decided I wanted AWD. That made the Infiniti and Volvo much cheaper than the comparable bimmer. Audi wasn't on my list because I don't trust their reliability. Volvo won my personal driving comparisons (even against the 330i), but I wound up buying a G35X purely for practical reasons (cheaper, lower maintenance, better reported reliability, better resale value). I don't regret it one bit.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • Thanks roadburner, youd be happy to know that i went wit the 330. I did seriousley consider the s4, but in the end bmws steering is just so communicative and the suspension is taut yet composed, and the engine is SO smooth and linear. Great, great car. And im going to get a set of 18" blizzacks and mount them on the wheels that come with the 335 coupe with sport package, because i think they look cool on the 3 series sedan too. Thank you for your imput it really helped! By the way though, how do you do the changeover yourself do you have a lift? I dont want to have to take it up to the gas station every time i want to take the wheels off and on
  • Thanks qbrozen I did look at the g35, i didnt pursue the s60r but i did look at it briefly online, in general i dont think the car would give the driver as much feedback as the other two would. In the end i went with the 330, and im planing on getting snow tires (it only snows 6 or 7 days a year here anyway), i just thought the g35 was a little coarse compared with the bimmer, it was a great car dont get my wrong, just not as sophisticated with the way it drove. That car (the g35) is no doubt the more reliable choice though, youll be able to take it to 250000 miles easily if you take care of it. Have fun with your G thats a great car and thank you again for the advice
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,363
    Thanks roadburner, youd be happy to know that i went wit the 330. I did seriousley consider the s4, but in the end bmws steering is just so communicative and the suspension is taut yet composed, and the engine is SO smooth and linear.

    Great choice!

    By the way though, how do you do the changeover yourself do you have a lift? I dont want to have to take it up to the gas station every time i want to take the wheels off and on

    I use a Snap-on aluminum jack and stands. I just change one wheel at a time, and it still takes less than an hour. Mark the location of each tire LF, RF, etc., so you can put them on the same corner when you reinstall them. Also, put some anti-seize on each hub before you put put the wheel on and always use a torque wrench to ensure that the lug bolts are properly tightened.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,206
    i just thought the g35 was a little coarse compared with the bimmer, it was a great car dont get my wrong, just not as sophisticated with the way it drove.

    Oh, I'd have to agree. I mean, there is no free lunch. The G is considerably cheaper for a reason.

    Congrats on your choice. I'm sure you'll enjoy it.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Last time I checked to get a G with AWD you had to settle for an auto trans, is that still the case?
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,206
    Yes.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • xeyexeye Posts: 162
    We received at least 16" of snow this weekend. I brushed the snow off my 328xi and 335xi and drove them both out of my 75' driveway. No hesitation, no protest, ZERO wheelspin. I am completely satisfied. My next car?

    Hello BMW AWD? Just make sure it's turbocharged.

    Any questions?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Any questions?

    You didn't high center? You probably don't have 6" of ground clearance.

    Don't get overconfident.
  • xeyexeye Posts: 162
    High center? You mean teeter-totter with the belly of my car sitting atop the snow while the wheels spin out of control?

    Hardly.

    With the let-out of the clutch, the tires advanced the car without hesitation. The trail left behind was a prefect outline of the undercarriage as it leveled the snow. Had I been trying to scale a 2' pile of gravel, I would not have attempted the same maneuver.

    Considering the fun I have driving the 328xi, ad especially the 335xi with the twin turbos and the AWD, as long as I'm in New England, I will consider other vehicles when my car goes geriatric, but I doubt I'll buy any other marque.

    This is just too much fun.

    xeye
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I guess 16" of powder packs down (or gets plowed out of the way) to less than 6". Just be careful when the stuff is packed and there's more than the clearance you have.
  • How are the 335ix turbos performing during this sub-zero temperature up there? We are moving to Green Bay, WI, and I was thinking about leasing the BMW 335ix. But I have read elsewhere that the twin-turbos, or any other turbos for that matter, is a bad idea in the cold. Your input is greatly appreciated.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    But I have read elsewhere that the twin-turbos, or any other turbos for that matter, is a bad idea in the cold.

    I cannot for the life of me figure out why that might be. I used to live in Chicago and owned two turbo cars while I lived there. The only issue (if you can call it that) with cold weather that I ever found was that you were able to get significantly MORE power from the engine on very cold days, especially if the intake was intercooled (which the 335i is).

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Cool air ought to help all engines, and a turbo puts out more heat so if anything it would benefit more than other engines would.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Apparently you're having a difficult time figuring out what the OP was referring to as well. ;)
  • Shipo. Sorry for the confusion. I was looking around the internet on driving a turbo car in the winter time and came across a lot of Jetta TDI owners stating that their turbo cars have a very hard time warming up quickly during the winter time. The TDIs take so long that they have do-it-yourself projects where they use foam pipe outer covering to stuff the front air-intake of the cars so that they will warm up faster. They keep them on all winter long. They said all turbo cars, including the 335ix which we are interested in, have experienced the same problem.

    I, for one, do not think it is a good idea to block the front air-intake. It is my understanding as well that colder air increases performance by increasing the horse power. And I believe that turbos and twin-turbos run a lot hotter than normal aspirated cars and will need the front air-intakes to cool them down. I'll try to find the pictures of their projects and post them here.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    A couple of points:

    1) Many things that may be true for the TDI generally have zero bearing on other cars, turbocharged or not.

    2) Colder air allows for increased performance due to the fact that the colder the charge, the denser it is (i.e. more oxygen molecules per given volume, allowing for a commensurate increase in the amount of fuel injected into it -- this is more of a factor with normally aspirated engines), AND the cooler the intake charge, the high the boost can be and/or the further advanced the ignition and valve timing can be before reaching the point of insipient detonation.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • xeyexeye Posts: 162
    In the Boston area, the engine fires up immediately, the revs settle down to 650 at idle and the turbos are as kick-[non-permissible content removed] as on a beautiful summer day.

    On the other hand, Green Bay is a place where only truly die-hard Packer cheese-heads live! I don't have any doubt at all that the 335xi will perform very well in the cold. I do suggest following BMW's recommendation about top tier gas (Shell, Sunoco, etc. Your dealer can give you a list). Also, check out the right oil. I use Castrol Synthetic 5W-30. That should work for you but check with a knowledgeable mechanic.

    I used to think everyone should drive a 335xi, but if that were true, I wouldn't be able to blow by other cars so easily!

    Go for it. I'm sure you won't regret it. I would strongly suggest a block heater, though. I used one for many years in Montreal, and it was an engine saver.

    xeye
  • xeyexeye Posts: 162
    Shipo,

    I'm amazed that I can offer something that I'm sure you already know. It's the same reason you get lousy mileage on the same trips in the winter as the summer. The colder air is denser and the engine knows this. It appropriately injects more fuel to balance the density of air. It may produce more power, but I don't know the physics and chemistry of the equation. (College was a long time ago.)

    Even though the intake may be intercooled (I wasn't aware of this), it's starting with much colder air. It depends on how the intercooler determines when it's job is done. If you have more information on this, I'd appreciate your input.

    xeye
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Also, check out the right oil. I use Castrol Synthetic 5W-30.

    Please be advised that Castrol Syntec 5W-30 DOES NOT meet the necessary oil specifications required for any BMW built since at least the late 1990s. Running that oil is a recipe for a sludged engine and a refusal from your dealership/BMW for warranty repairs if/when the engine fails. The only Castrol Syntec that meets the BMW LongLife-98 and LongLife-01 oil specifications (equired for every gasoline powered BMW sold this decade is Syntec 0W-30. That said, you can buy a Castrol produced oil under the BMW label from your dealership that is in fact a 5W-30, but make no mistake, that is NOT the same oil as is in the Castrol Syntec 5W-30 bottle.

    For all who buy their own oil, the only two generally available LL-01 oils sold here in the U.S. are Mobil 1 0W-40 and Castrol Syntec 0W-30.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Ummm, well it doesn't actually work that way. While it is true that he engine control systems weigh the intake charge and inject the appropriate amount of fuel into it, it is not true that your engine gets worse winter time mileage for that reason. In theory, your engine will ingest the exact same amount of air by weight (and then inject the exact same amount of fuel as a result) per produced horsepower-hour, winter or summer. Said another way, denser air does not automatically equate to lower fuel economy.

    The most common reason why engines deliver lower fuel economy in the winter is that fuel doesn't as easily vaporize in a very cold intake charge as it does in a warm or hot intake charge, and as such, the engine needs to run a tad richer to make sure the burn inside the cylinders is properly controlled. That said, depending upon how the intake is setup, turbocharged engines have the ability to negate the cold air/poor vaporization thing by relying on the warming effect the turbocharger(s) create by compressing the intake charge. Back in the 1980s I had a non-intercooled turbocharged car that actually got better fuel economy on the highway in the winter months, in fact, the best mileage it ever got was driving across Nebraska at something like ten degrees below zero.

    The question here is, "Does the 335i bypass the intercooler when the intake charge is cold and the engine is being operated at partial throttle?" Answer: I don't know for sure, but I kind of doubt it, that would be a lot of plumbing.

    Taken from a different perspective, Audi, with its FSI style engines that inject the fuel directly into the hot combustion chamber, is now producing cars that vary little winter vs. summer with regards to fuel economy.

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Diesels are totally different. We shouldn't even group turbo-diesels with gas turbos when we discuss forced induction.
  • krzysskrzyss Posts: 843
    One thing that was not mentioned is that winter gas and summer gas have different formulations and simply winter gas has less energy per volume than summer flavour.
    AFAIK

    Krzys
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    My understanding is that the seasonal formulations vary by region. I did a little studying on this a couple of years back when E10 first made its appearance here in New England, and IIRC, the formulation here in the Boston area is the same year round.

    Anybody with more recent information?

    Best regards,
    Shipo
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Same here in MD.

    At first it varied by the time of year, but now we use E10 year-round. No change in the formula seasonally any more.
  • richt5richt5 Posts: 43
    I have 2 2006 mazda 6's ,a 2.3 i4 gt and a gt speed6.The fuel mileage difference between the 2 --- summer vs winter is about the same. Its 2 miles per gallon better in the summer. I watch mileage very carefully . This is real would driving . The biggest difference I have found is between gas brands ----- I know you wouldnt think so. I have found Shell to be the most inconsistent , sometimes 3 miles to the gallon less --- remember 2 cars , same conditions , same drivers and accurate calculations. Political concerns aside , Citgo is the most consistent. So turbo vs non turbo , 2 very similar cars (for this test) , the turbo still uses a little more gas in cold weather as does the non turbo. Buy the way both cars are great. thanks . I hope this offers some clarity to the subject.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Both sedans?

    Interesting to own the same car twice, despite major differences in the powertrains.
  • waygrabowwaygrabow Posts: 210
    I sold my MazdaSpeed6 last Fall; then drove our 03 Audi A4; now drive our 09 A4. That MazdaSpeed6 was a lot of car for the money. I still miss it, but it encouraged me to get speeding tickets. I got between 24-29 mpg with it. The regular Mazda6 is a nice car, but I doubt if it drives the same.

    The A4 is a nice car but more bland. An automatic transmission just doesn't get me involved in the driving process; so I treat it like an appliance, with little urge to "push" it.
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