Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Hyundai Accent

1232426282931

Comments

  • tsgeiseltsgeisel Posts: 352
    Well, not designed like that, but suppposedly the Elantra will have a mid-year 2007 hatchback release.

    I like the non-wagon look of my current Elantra hatch. And I'm amused by the fact that one of the reviews said something like "20-something [my bad memory] of cubic feet of storage in the Accent with the seats down", when I have that much storage space in the Elantra with the seats up.

    It looks good, but I'm discovering the usefulness of a larger car...
  • jrtny04jrtny04 Posts: 17
    and the msrp for this will be ........27k give or take
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    In which currency?
  • duncan36duncan36 Posts: 8
    Wow thats at Accord VP territory. Which admittedly is a bit low rent in some areas but still its an Accord. Its more powerful and its fuel economy probably isnt far off the Accent, which has mediocre economy with the auto. Hyundai isnt shy about their pricing here recently, I think they kind of have delusions of grandeur. They're still Hyundai.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    Yes it's Accord VP territory, but would that Accord VP for $16k have automatic, power moonroof, 16" alloys, CD changer/cassette with subwoofer, 8-way adjustable driver's seat, 60/40 rear seat, sport cloth interior, leather steering wheel and shifter, sport-tuned suspension? No. You can get a stripped Accent equipped much more like the Accord VP for a lot less money.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    I finally got to drive the 2007 Accent 3-door today, but it was the base GS model and not the SE, that I really wanted to drive. :( The GS was a 5-speed MT with the AC/stereo package and mats, MSRP $12,430.

    The interior forward of the rear seatbacks is very similar to that of the Accent sedan, which I have driven before. The GS is more spartan, however, and lacks things that are on the GLS sedan such as cloth door inserts, temperature gauge, lighted vanity mirrors, and fold-down rear armrest. The black interior looks pretty spartan compared to the brighter GLS interior. But the cloth is good-looking, and the 8-way driver's seat with dual-knob height adjuster and fold-down armrest is still there to provide a best-in-class driving position. The controls and switches have a smooth feel that belies the low sticker price.

    Interior room seems about the same as in the GLS sedan, except for rear headroom. I was able to get comfortable in the rear seat when sitting behind myself (5'10"), but there was no room to spare for knees or head. I got a little extra headroom in back by reclining the rear seatback to its 2nd position. The rear seat has pretty good thigh support and would be OK for a few hours, but I wouldn't want to take a cross-country trip back there. The storage area behind the 60/40 rear seats is quite large, and there is a hard cargo cover but it doesn't raise up automatically when the hatch is raised. The rear seatbacks fold nearly flat. There are three rear headrests.

    With max A/C on the whole way, the Accent didn't have much get-up-and-go from its 110 hp engine, but it was perfectly fine for around-town driving and could get out of its way merging onto the highway. I didn't push the engine since it was a brand-new tester. The clutch was smooth and effortless, a real pleasure to use. The shifter has been villified by C/D and others. Personally I thought it was a pretty good piece. The throws were longer than on cars like the Fit and Versa, but the shift action was smooth and quiet, unlike the Fit which was notchy, and the Versa which emitted a loud and cheap-sounding "thunk-thunk" with every shift.

    The best feature of the Accent is its quiet and smooth ride. It feels like a much larger car. It is very quiet for a small car (according to C/D's tests, it is much quieter than the Fit and as quiet at cruise as an Accord EX V6). The chassis is rock-solid and there were no squeaks or rattles. The car glides over bumps without the "thunks" that many competitors give up. Handling is neutral, but not the on-rails feel like that of the Fit (the SE has a sport-tuned suspension and 16" alloy wheels, while the GS has 14" steel wheels). Steering is light, but with enough road feel to help you stay connected to the road. (The GS and SE have sport-tuned steering compared to the GLS sedan.) The non-ABS brakes (front disc, rear drum) were smooth, with progressive feel; I didn't push them however. (ABS is not available on the GS; it is standard on the SE and optional on the GLS sedan for 2007).

    The optional 172-watt single CD 6-speaker stereo (standard on SE and GLS) sounded good and looks like it would not be out of place in a much more expensive car. The GS has manual remote mirrors and manual locks and window cranks. (The power accessories and remote locking are available for $400 more.) The optional AC struggled mightily to cool down the black interior after sitting in the sun all day with the temperature near 100, but after about 5 minutes on "max" it blew cold air.

    The Accent GS is a good little runabout--smooth, quiet, easy to drive, good build quality and materials quality, and IMO perhaps the best looking of the current small hatchbacks. It's also the least expensive of the small hatches, about $1000 less MSRP than the Yaris comparably equipped. And it has the long Hyundai warranty. It's main flaw I think is that it is not even available with a popular safety feature: ABS. ABS is standard on the sportier SE, but that model starts at $14.6k, albeit well-equipped. If you don't need ABS and want a basic but quality little hatchback, the Accent GS is worth a long look.
  • I'm sorry but ABS has pretty much become a standard these days. There's not many people that want a car without 28 year old technology (ABS first introduced into production cars in 1978).

    SO, that means that if I want a 2007 Accent 3-door AUTO with ABS, I need to pay $15,495 (with dest.)??!! That's insane. WHy not purchase a Fit or Rabbit for less than $1K more? One can even get a 2006 Mazda6i AUTO for around $16K after rebates (or yes, even a lovely Sonata).

    Is that $1K worth:
    More standard safety equipment
    Better resale value
    Better crash worthiness
    Better performance
    More advanced powertrain (5 and 6-speed AUTOs)
    Better fuel economy (Honda)
    Far better interior quality (Rabbit)
    Better brand reliability history (Honda)

    You bet it is. For this thing to sell, it needs a $2K rebate. Anything less, and it won't move off dealer lots period.

    I think this is why we are seeing such a drop off in sales for the Accent in CY2006 over CY2005 (down 20%). It's just not the "bargain" it once was. Though it's in line with Hyundai's other models: Elantra (down 13%), Santa Fe (down 38%!), Tiburon (down 11%), Tuscon (down 8%). Really, the only thing that keeps Hyundai afloat is the heavily discounted Sonata.
  • Another thing to keep in mind is that the Accent has a timing belt versus a timing chain found on the Honda Fit and VW Rabbit. Factor in $600-800 every 60K for the belt change and service and the difference in cost shrinks even smaller.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    I think the timing belt replacement cost on an Accent is quite a bit less than $600-800.

    You raise good points about pricing. I did say that if you can do without ABS (and many people can--check Town Hall for the comments re "I don't want ABS!"), the Accent GS is worth a look. Also some people don't want the power windows etc. in their car. They want a basic car. The Accent GS gives that, starting at about $11k.

    A Rabbit equipped like a base Accent SE (that is, including 16" alloys) is about $16k, or about $1400 more list than the Accent. Assuming both cars would be bought at list, I agree it is tough to justify buying the Accent. But toss in a $1000 rebate (currently on the '06 Accent, and I bet coming soon to the '07s), and a discount of around $800 and now you're looking at over $3000 difference, because I don't expect there will be much discounting on the 3-door Rabbit. Then it becomes a more interesting decision. You would have in the Accent a car with significantly better fuel economy, better predicted reliability, and better warranty. Compared to the base Fit, the Accent SE discounted as I described would be less expensive, have many more features, a much more adjustable/comfortable driving position, a smoother ride, and IMO much better looking, with the tradeoffs of a little worse fuel economy, less cargo versatility, and lower historical resale value.

    A lot depends on which criteria are most important to you. If cargo versatility is really important, the Fit has a huge advantage. If rear-seat legroom is important, the Versa is the class leader. If driving position is really important, the Accent and its cousin the Rio5 are best-in-class IMO. If power is important, the Rabbit is much better than the low-end cars but bumps up against more powerful cars like the Mazda3s when comparing 5-door cars.
  • "I think the timing belt replacement cost on an Accent is quite a bit less than $600-800."

    Check the Accent forums. That price is accurate. My Hyundai dealer charged me $200 for a measely 15K service (I checked with 3 other dealers, ALL charge this). $350-400 are routine for 30K services and $600-800 for the 60K w/ timing belt change. My friend paid $650 for her timing belt change on an 03 Elantra and she doesn't even live in a metro area.

    "Accent SE discounted as I described would be less expensive, have many more features, a much more adjustable/comfortable driving position, a smoother ride, and IMO much better looking, with the tradeoffs of a little worse fuel economy, less cargo versatility, and lower historical resale value."

    Smoother ride? Not in my experience. Fit beats the Accent hands down in driving dynamics IMO (C&D concurr).

    Tradeoffs? Awful resale value, poorer crash scores, less cargo space, worse fuel economy, higher routine maintenance costs (see timing belt), poorer handling and engine response, sloppy shifter (mine and C&D's experience), etc.

    A $3-4K difference is REQUIRED before anyone is going to buy the Accent. That's how Hyundai sells its cars: cheap.

    However, even when looking at 2006 Accents (with $1000 rebate), it appears that significant cost difference isn't helping the Accent in sales. When sales are down 20% compared with the rubbish 2005 model(that didn't exact break sales records either), something is wrong. The market has become a much more crowded place. One year ago, the inferior Accent didn't have to compete with the Yaris, Fit, Versa, Rabbit, etc. One year ago, the consumer had to choose a $10K Accent or have to fork over $16K+ for a Civic, Corolla, or Mazda3.

    ALso note the significant decline of Elantra sales. A 2006 Elantra GLS AUTO with ABS now costs $16,495. The Limited model goes for even $1K more. Ridiculous. What will a 2007 Elantra AUTO with ABS cost? $17K? $18K?

    "If power is important, the Rabbit is much better than the low-end cars but bumps up against more powerful cars like the Mazda3s when comparing 5-door cars."

    I'll take the Rabbit's 170 lbs of torque at a low 3750 RPMS anyday. When you test drove it, did you notice how you could start the car in 3rd gear or could pass cars with ease at 40 MPH in 5th gear? That's torque.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    No, I don't ever start cars in 3rd gear. Why would I want to do that?

    I think you are confusing a complete 60k service with a timing belt replacement. A timing belt replacement is only one thing done in a 60k service, which is the biggest servicing the Accent and many other cars have. $600 for the complete 60k service, maybe. But not just the timing belt.

    FWIW, I paid quite a bit less than $200 for the 15k Elantra service. But I was very clear to only do the manufacturer's recommended services, not the extra stuff the dealer wanted to do. I think it was about $150. Sorry the dealers in your area charge so much. Maybe you should find a different shop.

    C/D did praise the smooth ride of the Accent GLS--"creamy" they called it. They haven't tested the SE yet, with its sport-tuned suspension. From other reviews I've read of it, it appears Hyundai was able to tighten up the handling without making the ride too harsh.

    The IIHS hasn't crash-tested the Accent 3-door yet, so we don't know what those crash tests are. On handling, the SE seems to handle quite well based on what I've read, but I'll have to see for myself. And I liked the shifter of the Accent much better than I thought I would. It avoids the notchiness of the Fit's shifter, although the throws are longer. I don't think it's as bad as C/D made it out to be.

    As for the decline in Accent sales, I think that's due to a couple of things. First, last year there was a 3-door available all year. This year, the 3-door just now is beginning to show up at dealers. That alone could account for a 20% decline in sales. But the other thing is that it took Hyundai awhile to put rebates on the '06 Accent GLS. At $15.4k for an automatic sedan with power package, it was bumping up squarely against Hyundai's own Elantra and many other cars. The rebate was needed to make pricing more realistic. As for the Elantra, it's a six-year-old design that is outclassed by some newer compacts, and the rebates on it have been lower this year than in past years. With dealers selling nicely-equipped Sonatas for $14-16k, it's a hard sell unless you want a hatchback.
  • "No, I don't ever start cars in 3rd gear. Why would I want to do that?"

    I guess you haven't owned manual equipped cars in the snow belt.

    I said 60K service. The timing belt change accounts for the majority of cost/labor of that service.

    "C/D did praise the smooth ride of the Accent GLS--"creamy" they called it."

    They had to find something nice to say for a car that placed only 5th out of 7 cars (the other 2 being the Suzuki Reno (no comment) and ugly Caliber).

    "They haven't tested the SE yet, with its sport-tuned suspension."

    "sport-tuned" and Hyundai typically don't mix. Have you test driven an Elantra GT (with its supposed "sport-tuned" suspension) and compared it with an Elantra GLS? It's exactly the same...some say worse. Read more at www.elantraxd.com.

    "The IIHS hasn't crash-tested the Accent 3-door yet, so we don't know what those crash tests are."
    They havent tested the 4 door either. Though NHTSA did and gave it a lovely 3 stars rear side impact. I wouldn't want anyone's kids, let alone my kids in that back seat. Combine that with the unavilability of ABS in the GS level and that's just unsafe.

    "First, last year there was a 3-door available all year. This year, the 3-door just now is beginning to show up at dealers. That alone could account for a 20% decline in sales."

    I doubt the 3-door made up a significant amount of total Accent sales in prior years. Care to back that up with some figures? Certainly not enough to justify a 20% decline in sales. That's huge. The Accent model has been struggling for years. Increasing the price at a time of vastly increased competition from more "premium" brands isn't helping things.

    It's rather simple:

    1. Increased price
    2. poor customer perception of "Accent" brand
    3. Little to no advertising
    4. Increased competition from more "premium" brands
    5. Reduced rebates
    6. Historically awful resale value
    7. Underwhelming test drive perceptions (at least those who I've talked to)
    8. Less than spectacular crash test results
  • shado4shado4 Posts: 287
    You bet it is. For this thing to sell, it needs a $2K rebate. Anything less, and it won't move off dealer lots period.

    That's funny. With only a $1K rebate offered on the 2006 model, Hyundai managed to sell 43% more Accents last month compared to June 2005 (5,848 to 4,086). Yes, overall year to year sales of the Accent are down, but I agree with Backy that the addition of the 3-door model to the lineup will help.

    Hyundai has nothing to worry about. The new Santa Fe is now arriving at dealer lots and the new Elantra will be coming soon. Hyundai is in a better position to see sales go even higher. Volkswagen, who can't even sell half as many vehicles as Hyundai in the U.S. during the first six months of 2006, is now trying to sell a Rabbit that can cost well over $20,000! $20K+ for a Rabbit? That's a mighty bitter carrot, er, pill to swallow. :blush:
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    I've owned many stick-shift cars in the snow belt. Just never had to start them in 3rd gear. 2nd once or twice.

    C/D said several nice things about the Accent they tested. They even recommended to their readers that they should "take it for a whirl."

    I have not only driven the Elantra GLS and the GT, I've owned both of them at the same time for over 2 years, so I think I am qualified to say that the suspension and steering on those two cars is distinctly different, with a much different feel. (Keep in mind though that the GLS 5-door has exactly the same suspension and handling as the GT; the GLS sedan is different.) Thus I am looking foward to seeing what Hyundai did with the Accent SE.

    Note that the Fit got a "lowly" 3-star rating by the NHTSA in the rear on the side crash test also. But you were talking up the Fit before as if it were superior to the Accent. Does that mean you prefer the Fit over the Accent, but only if you don't put kids in the back seat?

    If you would like to research the 3-door sales of the Accent before 2006, be my guest. I see quite a few of them running around. How do you know it's not enough to justify a 20% decline in sales, until you know how many Accents before 2006 MY were 3-doors? Care to back up your assertion that "The Accent model has been struggling for years" with some facts?

    I've already agreed the list price on the Accent is too high; HMA agrees also since they did put a $1000 rebate on the '06 models awhile ago. I expect to see a rebate on the '07s once the '06s are gone. As for advertising, HMA is obviously using their marketing bucks on their pricier (and more profitable) cars. Keep in mind they have had to launch seven new models in less than two years, so that's a lot of advertising to do. It makes sense to put the dollars where the most profit is, e.g. Azera, Sonata, Entourage, and soon the Santa Fe.

    Would you care to name another car in the Accent's class that received "spectacular" crash test ratings, i.e. 4 x 5-stars on the NHTSA crash tests? Or is the Accent being held to a higher standard than all other cars in its class?

    As for "underwhelming test drive perceptions," IMO, the Accent is one of the most pleasant cars to drive in its class. It doesn't have the sharpest handling, "magic" rear seats, 150 hp, or room for Shaq to sit in back, but in terms of a smooth, comfortable, economical commuter and around-town car, I think it does a fine job. For the right price, I could see one in my garage someday.
  • prosource1prosource1 Posts: 234
    I think it is quite unfair to judge Hyundai's previous attempts with the same measure as their recent offerings. Hyundai is investing BILLION$ in R&D each year and their new vehicles are showing their big spending. I looked at a Santa Fe again today and that is going to be a hot vehicle just like the Sonata and Azera. Say or think what you want but Hyundai is not the company it was and every new vehicle they are putting out is causing a stir in the market.
  • joe97joe97 Posts: 2,248
    Can I ask if you have had a chance to test drive the new Accents? The only reason I ask is because your post is full of incorrect facts and perceptions. FWIW, every review I have read on the Accent praises the new model, for the most part; yet when I read your posts, the Accent (or the entire Hyundai line for that matter) is nothing but junk products. The uniqueness (in its class) of the Accent SE is that it comes with 16" wheels, sport-tuned, stiffer suspension (70% more, which puts it around Tibby level), plus more. Of course, I am sure you will put a different spin on the above facts.
  • "Yes, overall year to year sales of the Accent are down, but I agree with Backy that the addition of the 3-door model to the lineup will help."

    Accent YTD sales are down 20% for the year. That's no small number. In comparison, Jetta sales are UP 28.3% YTD.

    "$20K+ for a Rabbit? That's a mighty bitter carrot, er, pill to swallow."

    When fully loaded to the gills, yes a Rabbit can reach 20K. Though it starts at under $15K very nicely equipped. An Azera can reach over $30K??!! 30K for a Hyundai??!! See my point?
  • "Note that the Fit got a "lowly" 3-star rating by the NHTSA in the rear on the side crash test also. But you were talking up the Fit before as if it were superior to the Accent. Does that mean you prefer the Fit over the Accent, but only if you don't put kids in the back seat"

    The FIT is a great car, but with it's rear 3 star side impact rating, no way my kids are going back there. Like i've said countless times, kids are not going in the back seat unless the car received a very good rear side-impact (IIHS "silver" or "gold"). Though the FIT does have STANDARD ABS which helps. The Accent 3-door can't say that.

    "Care to back up your assertion that "The Accent model has been struggling for years" with some facts? "

    Sure. Look at www.hyundainews.com under "sales releases" for the past 3 years. Notice a trend with the Accent? Yeah, it has a continual downward curve of sales numbers. Plot it out in Excel if you wish :)

    "Would you care to name another car in the Accent's class that received "spectacular" crash test ratings, i.e. 4 x 5-stars on the NHTSA crash tests? Or is the Accent being held to a higher standard than all other cars in its class?"

    I'll pay a few bucks more a month and get a much safer car, you know, one that received a "silver" or "gold" IIHS award. I'm sure a few come to mind...

    "For the right price, I could see one in my garage someday."

    Right, that's why you've already purchased an Accent, right? Wait...

    You're waiting for Hyundai to price it right, you know, like $3-4K below its competitors? Give it time my friend, Hyundai will see the light of day soon enough.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,681
    Let's be factual here: the lowest list price for a Rabbit is $15.6K including destination (which is non-negotiable). A 5-door Rabbit with only two options, a moonroof and the lowest priced factory alloys (16")--in other words, hardly loaded to the gills--comes to $20,095. The Azera is a 263 hp near-luxury car that is not at all comparable to a Rabbit.

    A VW can reach over $40k. $40k for a vee-dub?!? ;)
  • "The only reason I ask is because your post is full of incorrect facts and perceptions."

    Care to elaborate? Just what exactly have I said that that is "incorrect?"

    "FWIW, every review I have read on the Accent praises the new model, for the most part; yet when I read your posts, the Accent (or the entire Hyundai line for that matter) is nothing but junk products."

    I can name numerous reviews that paint the Accent as a sub-par car, but what does it matter. So, because my own opinion conflicts with what YOU read somewhere, i'm automatically incorrect. Right...

    "The uniqueness (in its class) of the Accent SE is that it comes with 16" wheels, sport-tuned, stiffer suspension (70% more, which puts it around Tibby level), plus more."

    Not sure how slapping some cheap alloys on a car, claiming a stiff suspension (70% stiffer you say?) makes the car unique. Ah, must have forgoten the "plus more."
Sign In or Register to comment.