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Midsize Sedans Comparison Thread

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Comments

  • venus537venus537 Posts: 1,443
    "I would rank this guy as being pretty business savvy. I'm sure he has done his homework and cost/analysis of owning/leasing whichever vehicles for his business."

    Hmmm.

    The company that does maintenance work for our digital imaging and printing equipment uses Fords for their technicians.

    According to one technician, a Mercedes M would be cheaper to lease than the Fords but it wouldn't look good for a technician to pull up in a Mercedes.

    All I know is that I would personally be much better off leasing a Honda over a Ford sedan in terms of cost. Sorry, what some pizza joint uses for their delivery vehicles doesn't urge me to go out and get that vehicle.
  • Heck, an acquaintance even bought a Suzuki Verona and that is really not a bad car, for a low cost family sedan.

    Aren't most Suzuki's rebadged Daewoos (Reno, Verona, Forenza)? Just curious. I think Suzuki's models are actually nice looking vehicles, although seemingly old-school as far as technology goes (Verona had a 6-cylinder that makes only 155 hp, Forenza has an Iron-Block 2.0L engine that makes less horsepower than a Civic of 11 years ago, and delivers only 22 MPG (worse than any of the I-4 midsizers, and a couple of the V-6 models!)
  • "Yeah, well, to offer a high-quality sedan with lots of pep, midsize room, 26/34 MPG, and a price under $18k when you deal, they have to cut costs somewhere."

    Hyundai Sonata V6 GLS 2006 model. Can't find any cost cuts anywhere in my car. Has it all then some. paid $16,495 before TT&L. I'm happy.
  • ontopontop Posts: 279
    Different strokes.

    I'd never buy a Hyundai. Negative karma......
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    So what you are saying is, A Ford/GM/Chrysler will never, ever be as good as a Honda/Toyota right? This just can't happen?

    I would not say it can't happen. But do I think it will happen? Probably not.

    It would take a lot of changes. Their whole philosophy (way of thinking), needs to change. The percentage of profits (if there are any), spent on research and development, needs a large increase.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    Yes, you are correct. The majority of Suzukis imported to the USA are rebadged Daewoos, but the Aerio and new SX4 are real Suzukis built in Japan. Other Japanese-built Suzukis are not imported to the USA. Interestingly, a friend of mine who is a grad student here at the University of Illinois told me that more Suzukis are sold in Japan than any other Japanese marque. Is this true? I would find it hard to believe, but he's a very bright young man, and is a gear-head at heart.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    ontop wrote:

    Different strokes.

    I'd never buy a Hyundai. Negative karma......

    Only negative karma for those who: 1). never owned a recent Hyundai product, and 2). are more concerned about perceived status than price, value, and quality - yes, you can have all at the same time. Those who bought a new generation Sonata have done their homework, made the A-B-C comparisons, and chose a Sonata. Yes, Honda and Toyota afficiandoes can play the depreciation card (factual arguement - at this time), but for those who keep a car for a decade or more, depreciation is a rather moot point. And, what a Sonata owner loses on the back end, he/she gains on the front end due to excellent factory/dealer incentives and Hyundai loyalty rebates.
  • You should be happy. The Sonata is a great car, especially at that price! I test drove it and loved the driving dynamics. Happy motoring! :shades:
  • We have different ideas of "high-quality." The Sonata doesn't scream cheap, but I feel like the Accord wins on things like interior quality/design/materials.

    Important thing is that buyers of both vehicles are happy with their purchases. Would I buy an Accord VP? Probably not, actually. If I was dead-set on an Accord, I'd either save a little more for an LX model, or look for an end-of-the-year bargain. I'm a frugal guy, and will likely drive my car into the ground, so long-LONG lasting cars are important. I currently have a 1996 daily driver Accord with 166,000 miles on it, as well as an 06 Accord. They get equal mileage monthly (approx 1k a month on each).
  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,341
    I certainly don't think all domestic brands leave people stranded on the highway. I have owned many GM, Ford, Chrysler products, and have never been left stranded by any of them (dead battery doesn't count).

    Actually, a dead battery does count!!! i had a dodge once that left me stranded due to a dead battery that was relatively new. why did it die? Well, apparently, the car had an electrical short that was draining the battery. Probably had something to do with all of the corroding parts that the Dodge dealer let corrode even though they worked on the car a hundred times and serviced it recently.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Actually, a dead battery does count!!!

    Not if you change the battery, and you're back to normal again.
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,119
    "All I know is that I would personally be much better off leasing a Honda over a Ford sedan in terms of cost. Sorry, what some pizza joint uses for their delivery vehicles doesn't urge me to go out and get that vehicle."

    You can knock this guy for owning pizza parlors. Seems like he is doing pretty well for himself. Fact is he chose Ford for his fleet of delivery vehicles. I am sure he did his homework over the 20+ years of owning his businesses. Sure goes against the grain of the stigma of all Fords being unrelaible hey? :shades:
  • venus537venus537 Posts: 1,443
    You can knock this guy for owning pizza parlors.

    Me, knock a pizza proprietor? I like pizza too much to do that.

    I just don't agree with your conclusions. What some business uses for their vehicles is not an endorsement for that vehicle's reliability one way or the other. There are other factors that are involved with such business decisions.
  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,341
    Thats the problem, changing the battery would only be a temporary "back to normal" solution. The next battery would get drained down quickly all the same.
  • I just don't agree with your conclusions. What some business uses for their vehicles is not an endorsement for that vehicle's reliability one way or the other. There are other factors that are involved with such business decisions.

    I agree with venus here. There is a courier service that is in downtown Birmingham (I pass it daily, and have for awhile now). Many years ago, they bought a fleet (about 18-20 I think) of Civic Hatchbacks (they stopped making those in the late 90s I think)... They still have that fleet - all Purple (they're ugly, but cavernous and cheap on gas). They are now going on ten years old, and have countless miles, but they still use the same cars. Sure goes against the idea that Hondas are too expensive, right?

    Point is, that one specific incident does not prove anything, just like I could find an instance where a new Ford or Honda had a terrible problem (it wouldn't be hard to do for any company). One terrible problem in one car does not a bad car company make; in the same respect, one company having a fleet of Fords and another having a fleet of Hondas proves NOTHING.
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,119
    Some may call it "childish" but it happens. To get on the freeway I use there is a long on ramp that merges into a single lane. This morning a Chrysler 300M pulled up next to me. I looked over looking for the Hemi badge. Because I knew if it were a Hemi, I wouldn't even have tried. He would have blown me away. Nope, no Hemi badge. So, I thought why not?. He knew exactly what he was doing and the point he was going to try to make. Light turned green, we were off. neck and neck?? I started to pull away, I could hear his engine rev, my engine rev.. I kept pulling away little by little. I had him by about 3 feet as we approached the lane merge, he backed down!!.. I was shocked and bewildered. My little Fusion with its "underpowered" 3.0 take on the Goliath of sports sedans and have it back down? At work I did some research on the 300. The only thing I could think of it was a 3.5 with AWD and the weight and AWD is what gave me the advantage.. :confuse:
  • Now HERE is a guy that should have bought a Camry Hybrid. With tax incentives, not that much more than the average Milan. And I literally guarantee he would have at least doubled his gas mileage---ESPECIALLY in NYC. I've concluded its impossible to average less than 30 mpg in this car. My low for a tank is 33.9, and that was the first tank. Now I'm up to just about 36. And I commute 70 miles a day in the nation's second worst traffic.
  • Not to take anything away from you, but I drove a Dodge Charger (same car, different badge), and it had the standard engine, which is a 2.7 V6. Same engine as the Stratus. That car is SLOW. Smooth enough, but SLOW. REALLY slow. Big car, lots of weight, small overworked engine.
  • Yeah, a Chrysler 300 with the 3.5L engine clocked 7.3 sec 0-60, I believe the normal time I see for a Fusion is between 7.2 and 7.4sec, so that's definitely do-able.

    BTW, I think you meant a just a "300" Touring or Limited sedan. A 300C would've had the hemi, and the 300M would've been a few years old I believe: image
  • Not to take anything away from you, but I drove a Dodge Charger (same car, different badge), and it had the standard engine, which is a 2.7 V6. Same engine as the Stratus. That car is SLOW. Smooth enough, but SLOW. REALLY slow. Big car, lots of weight, small overworked engine.

    Actually, per Dodge.com, Charger comes standard with the 3.5L 250 hp engine. Only the base model 300 and Magnum wagon come with the 2.7L 190 hp engine.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    That's why Chrysler puts Hemis in these cars. Their V6 engines don't have enough power for those heavy cars. With a car that big and heavy, you need a V8, if you want some performance. Then be willing to pay for it at the pump.
  • ontopontop Posts: 279
    the Goliath of sports sedans

    I think you need to do a little more research into what's being considered as 'Goliath' in the sports sedan market.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,738
    see what happens when the weather turns cold, if it does, where you live.
  • My last car got 20 mpg. This one gets 35. So what's going to happen? Its going to drop down to 32?
  • venus537venus537 Posts: 1,443
    The 300 is a very muscular car but I don't think it's much of a sports sedan. I don't think saying the 300 is the "Goliath of sports sedans" is necessarily saying it's a very good sports sedan though. I can read that to mean it's one brute of a car.
  • bhmr59bhmr59 Posts: 1,598
    I didn't go back to read your earlier post, but depending on how cold it gets where you live your milage could drop 10 to 20%.

    Most of my driving is under 5 miles. When the temp is constantly under 50* my previous cars have lost about 10% in mpg. If the temp is constantly in the 20's they have lost about another 10%.
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,119
    C'mon, this car is beautiful no doubt. If you could afford the Hemi, sport package top of the line in this car wouldn't you? I sure would!? The styling on this car is very one of a kind.
  • scape2scape2 Posts: 4,119
    Let me guess, only Ford/GM cars loose mileage when its cold right? ;)
  • kdhspyderkdhspyder Posts: 7,160
    Sounds about right. 20-30% loss in FE in cold weather short trips.
  • jmlljmll Posts: 3
    Have to agree w/ cajun. Test drove '06 and '07 Camry LEs and '06 Accord LX b4 I purchased an '06 Sonata GLS V6. Out the door cash price $19,300, including sunroof option. For same price would have had to give up 75hp for a 4cyl Toyota or Honda, without options like 4 wheel disc brakes, aluminum alloy wheels, side curtain airbags, ESC, and 100K warranty which were all std on the Hyundai. 10K miles later, I couldn't be happier with my Sonata.
This discussion has been closed.