Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Porsche Cayman S

18911131416

Comments

  • kmanskmans Posts: 20
    Have you looked in the Cayman gallery at:
    http://www.caymanclub.net/gallery/browseimages.php?c=2

    Oh wait I see your question there as well,you might ask it in the forums instead to see if you get a response. Meteor is a new color for 07 so not as many pics yet.
  • That is a great link...

    Wow.. would it ever be hard to decide after checking all of those out... :surprise:

    Moderator - Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • Hi:

    Just took my 2006 Cayman-S in for a 15K mile service. I forgot to mention to the service department that my car alarm, once activated, goes off intermitently, several times each day. Typically, I get to work in the morning, activate the car alarm after exiting the vehicle, and within the hour the car alarm goes off. I can see my car from my office window: nothing and no one has touched the car. Is this an easy troubleshoot, or are intermittent alarm issues hit and miss? I don't want to sit and wait for several hours at the Dealer if the prospect of finding the fault is slight.

    Thanks.

    Adam
  • fedlawmanfedlawman Posts: 3,118
    How sensitive is your alarm?

    I ask because, on days when I drive my BMW to work, there is a car in the parking garage that starts chirping like a canary every time I slowly pass by. The alarm doesn't actually go off, but it sure sounds like it's thinking about it! I suspect that the frequency of my Supersprint/Magnaflow exhaust reverberating off the cement walls, floor, and ceiling tickles that car's funnybone.
  • How can I tell "how sensitive"? I can kick a tire, for example, and not set the alarm off. I park on an isolated concrete pad in the morning, and the asphalt road that allows nearby traffic is several feet away. Can the alarm system be tweaked?
  • topspin628topspin628 Posts: 373
    So a couple of days ago I took a 30 minute test drive in the Cayman S. Wow. It's a great car. The handling and sound of the engine were fantastic. I love the looks. My quandary is this: is it a good daily driver for the congested and often cold Northeast? I would use it almost every day and at times I am in the car for upwards of 2-4 hours in a given day (round trip). Much in traffic, so don't scream at me, but I would go for the auto tranny.
    My other possibilities are (different animals but I don't always cross shop the same class)
    BMW 650, 5 series or 3 (twin turbo)
    MB E Class- very different but a great daily driver.
    The Cayman stirs my soul but does the fantastic sound of the engine turn into an annoyance when you are driving for a long stretch? Do you miss a great stereo, ipod attachment, bluetooth for phone etc.?

    I would love any input. I think it's one of the top 10 "lookers" in the auto world.
    Thanks
  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    I have two things in common with you: I too am in my car for at 2hrs. or so per day and I too lust for a Cayman.

    My daily driver is a 3 series BMW and my lease is up in Aug.

    The way I have rationalized it is that the BMW has been comfortable, fun, safe and even thrifty and is thus ideal for its "workhorse" status. I see the Cayman as being a fun driver on weekends; i.e., for leisure rather than work activities.

    My next lease will probably be another BMW.

    I'm still considering the addition of a Cayman, in addition, though.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    Only YOU can answer this question of "tolerability"for yourself. Everybody's risk/reward equation on having a sports car as a daily driver is different.

    But (and I'm speaking quietly, not screaming), if you need to go for an automatic because of traffic, I think the Cayman may not be the right car for you. When we had a Honda S2000 as a third car, I found it delightful but my wife could only tolerate it for short drives due to the engine noise and high strung nature of the car. Our 911S is more "civilized"; the Cayman is probably in-between. But in spite of her lower tolerance level regarding noise, my wife NEVER would have given up a manual transmission in her daily driver SUV by choice. When we traded our Isuzu Trooper for a MDX, she had no choice.

    My point is that driving a stick in traffic may be a good metric. If you can't tolerate that, driving a high strung, relatively noisy sports car 2-4 hours a day might get old real fast.

    If I were faced with your situation, I'd be keeping my semi-retired 1995 Nissan Maxima SE 5-speed with 155k miles for most of the daily commutes (it's book value is about $3,500) and buy a 6-speed Cayman S for the weekends and days when I felt like commuting in (real) sport. Given that the tiptronic costs about $3,400 and diminishes resale, that's a better than even wash in my book. If that didn't work, I'd probably get a 335i - but still in manual mode. I'll be 50 soon and I'm getting too old to learn how to drive an automatic and smile at the same time. ;)

    If I did have to forego my left leg exercise, the E320 Bluetec might be worth considering.
  • topspin628topspin628 Posts: 373
    The 335i looks like a killer on paper. 0-60 times are faster than the current M3. Throw in good gas mileage, lots of creature comforts and tech stuff (bluetooth, killer stereo)and a good value (45-50K loaded)and how can you beat it? But...
    I test drove the sedan and liked but didn't love it yet. I had the last version of the 330i and that was a car I loved.
    This one also had all the right moves but maybe I've changed, since it didn't "rock my world". I may have to try the coupe which will have sport suspension. Now the Cayman is really a special car. It's not nearly as fast (in base), costs more, doesn't have the tech stuff but it's got show stopping looks and slot car handling. You know you're in a special machine. I like the tiptronic; one traffic jam trying to get into the Lincoln tunnel for 45 minutes has cured me of a stick as my everyday ride.
    Anyone out there using the Cayman as an everyday car and putting 15K of city driving on her per year? Chime in please.
  • "Anyone out there using the Cayman as an everyday car and putting 15K of city driving on her per year?"

    I averaged 13,500 miles a year in my Boxster S before trading it for a 911S last fall. It looks like I'll average 12,000 miles +/- in the 911. Less commuting (moved from North Carolina to Boston and live/work downtown) but more long weekend trips. Properly maintained, Porsches are pretty durable, if that's your concern.

    "I like the tiptronic; one traffic jam trying to get into the Lincoln tunnel for 45 minutes has cured me of a stick as my everyday ride."

    One traffic jam "cured" you? I'd re-label that as "poisoned" you. And only one - that's a pretty sad statement of intestinal fortitude. :confuse: ;)

    FWIW, Boston traffic is a lot worse than Charlotte and Raleigh, but it's never once caused me any additional pain or frustration to have a manual transmission. I happen to agree with the suggestion that if you can't endure a manual transmission in traffic, you will probably find a sports car as a daily driver will also wear on you. Obviously, it's your decision, but after driving a Cayman S tiptronic as a loaner whan my car was in for service, I was rather dissapointed. My previous test drives of a 6-speed were extremely positive - to the point I considered it in lieu of the 911S. But the tiptronic seemed to significantly sap the power (down to the level of a base Cayman with manual).
  • designmandesignman Posts: 2,129
    My quandary is this: is it a good daily driver for the congested and often cold Northeast? I would use it almost every day and at times I am in the car for upwards of 2-4 hours in a given day (round trip). Much in traffic, so don't scream at me, but I would go for the auto tranny.

    I couldn’t think of better reasons not to get a Porsche. It’s the last car I want in traffic short of an Elise. Adding an automatic transmission to this equation is just insult on top of injury. Big waste of money all around. These cars are made to be driven with the freedom of a bird, not wrangle with traffic, potholes and winter. Every once in a while I get stuck in traffic on the uphill approach to the GW bridge on route 46 and it tests my sanity. Another thing, fours hours a day is a lot of time to spend in a bumpy, noisy sports car; you should consider this also. What should be fun could become a prison. It’s not the time in the car, it’s that traffic combined with urban roads. Now, fours of ridin’ down the freeway and twistoflexeroonies, that’s a different story, but a roller coaster that doesn’t roll is no fun in my opinion.
  • carnaughtcarnaught Posts: 1,569
    What should be fun could become a prison. It’s not the time in the car, it’s that traffic combined with urban roads. Now, fours of ridin’ down the freeway and twistoflexeroonies, that’s a different story, but a roller coaster that doesn’t roll is no fun in my opinion.

    Well said. 'nuff said.
  • clemboclembo Posts: 253
    Buy the Cayman S for weekends - you don't want to do your commute in this car, get a used Accord for $10k and use it for the traffic fighter. When you get home from work and on weekends you can fire up the Cayman and relieve your stress. It is a great car, I have had mine for almost a year although it hasn't been out of the garage in a while due to crappy Boston weather. I think that I only have about 5k miles on the Cayman in a year, I should have more it is a blast to drive.
  • rmddsrmdds Posts: 10
    Manual drives Porsches have very little residual value in my country. Probably because of urban driving most of the time - lots of city congestion and numerous numbers of traffic light junctions.I have ordered a Cayman S in manual, but members in the local Porsche club have discouraged me against it. I have done a poll with the dealer of the number of caymans and 911s ordered in manual over the past year, and the figures reinforces the point.

    It would be an injustive spending so much on the car and not derive the maximum satisfaction of driving this beauty in manual. Sigh...My heart says manual, but my head says Tiptronic....

    Any opinions?
  • topspin628topspin628 Posts: 373
    Go with what you want but I for one see no shame in an automatic. They have become so good that the performance is very close. It's what you like and want that counts. By the way, read the comparison of the new Audi R8 and the Porsche turbo at Edmunds and you'll see that the Porsche has a 5 speed tiptronic and that's in a super car for 123K.
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    I agree with topspin - go with what YOU want.

    I have lived in DC for 20+ years and have yet to feel that "urban" driving was incompatible with a manual. With respect to resale, in our area a tiptronic has a lower residual value on leases and lower resale value - the opposite of what you are indicating. But even then, I'd repeat the advice to buy what you would enjoy driving and owning. Paying top dollar for a Porsche based upon what the next guy's preferences might be is, IMO, not what the experience is all about.

    P.S. I would also not pay attention to road tests of the 911 turbo tiptronic as any indication of the Cayman. From what I understand, you have to go through quite a "launch sequence" to achieve the claim of quicker than the manual - and that's only in a straight line from a dead stop. What matters is how you will be driving the car and what feels good to you. Stop light drag racing isn't why most people buy a Porsche - and certainly not the lower powered but exceptional handling Cayman model.
  • kmnsownrkmnsownr Posts: 1
    Definitely go for what YOU want. I have driven a manual Cayman S for the last year and have never found it to be bother in traffic or not. As for the engine noise...I have never found it to be intrusive but rather enjoyable instead of the radio....
  • habitat1habitat1 Posts: 4,282
    How many miles on your Cayman S in the last year?
  • clemboclembo Posts: 253
    I agree with you about the engine sound. I took my Cayman out today for the first time in a few months and I turned the radio off so I could enjoy the sweet mid-engine sounds of my car. It enhances the driving experience.
  • topspin628topspin628 Posts: 373
    So you moved from NC and now you are part of Red Sox Nation- well done. I live in NYC but unlike some here, I love the sox fans and a day at Fenway is hard to beat anywhere. Is your 911 a coupe or convert? If convert how is it at keeping out the cold/noise. Yeah, traffic in Boston is some of the worst I've ever seen. As for the tiptronic, I know where you and some of the P Fans are coming from and even at the bimmer boards you get a lot of folks who think that the manual is the only way to go. I have a miata that I use for weekend fun and it's a stick but for my everyday ride, I prefer an auto. To me the trade off is worth it. By the way, if Porche begins to use the DSG of Audi, then you will have a car that shifts faster and loses 0 performance(I guess it gains performance in fact). But if you love the experience of rowing the gears, I certainly can appreciate that. I think an auto Porsche is still a Porsche.
Sign In or Register to comment.