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Engine's burning oil - how much longer will it last?

2

Comments

  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    What weight oil did ya use............. Straight 40 or 50?

    Just nurse it along or spend big $$ to repair...................
  • bottgersbottgers Posts: 2,027
    I use 10-30. I have noticed a substantial reduction in the puff of smoke the engine lets out during cold starts since adding the Auto RX. Maybe this stuff will help. There are quite a few people in the bobistheoilguy.com forum who said this stuff worked for them. I am still scepticle as I've never had any success using oil additives in the past.
  • bottgersbottgers Posts: 2,027
    .....so far it appears that either Auto RX is nothing but snake oil or my engine's suffering from some type of mechanical wear that this stuff can't cure because I'm about 300 miles from dumping my first ARX application and the engine's still using just as much oil as it was before I started the treatment. I'm sure if this stuff was going to make a difference, I would've seen a change by now.
  • geo9geo9 Posts: 739
    Snake oil......................

    Go with straight 40 weight and keep running it !
    I do it with my ancient "winter rats". My 87 Escort never complains...LOL!
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Posts: 5,713
    ran with the motor burning oil at about a quart to every 250-300 miles IIRC. As a goofy young lad of 18 I failed to keep it topped off constantly and one day running down the Mukilteo Speedway north of Seattle it just...ummm...sputtered and froze up.

    Yep, I kept it alive and had a rebuilt 6 cyl 200 c.i. engine thrown in the nice looking Stang. The next major failure was the transmission and the car was gone, making way for a 1970 Chevrolet Suburban. Ya wanna talk about beasts to drive. Probably achieved 8 miles to the gallon in that people mover!

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • 210delray210delray Posts: 4,722
    How in the world could you go from a Mustang to a Suburban?

    Reminds me of the guy at work who seemed to be genuinely intrigued by the Ford Excursion when it first came out. Maybe he thought he could carry his Ford (Kia) Festiva inside it!
  • iluvmysephia1iluvmysephia1 Posts: 5,713
    and was willing to trade a '65 Mustang with a borken tranny for a good running rig. It was between a '73 AMC Gremlin and a 1970 Chevrolet Suburban and I chose the Suburban. The sub-10mpg forced another choice, though, within a few more months. Sometimes wish I would've chose the Gremlin but it seemed a little small for us. Ended up with a '66 Ford Fairlane I quickly dubbed old Smokey. :surprise:

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • bottgersbottgers Posts: 2,027
    .....is where it belongs.
  • Hello out there. I've searched the forum to find just this problem. I have a 2001 BMW, 330i. I run this car hard (all highway miles) and have $117K. The car has been a dream to drive, but now is burning oil at what I believe to me an unacceptable rate. Every 1000 miles (sometimes less / sometimes more) I have to put a quart of oil.

    I have taken the car to the dealership on multiple occasion. There is no leaking, the underside is dry as a bone. There is no discernable smoke on start-up or in motion. Power and gas mileage is great. The compression is within norms.

    The dealer conducted some form of test and removed / replace valve in the crankcase - they said it was out of spec and sucking up to much oil. This did not solve the problem. The dealership now has me using 10-60 M3 High Performance Motor Oil. They are trying to go the cheap route and not teardown the Engine.

    I think I have a problem within the Engine -i.e. rings , valve guides, etc.

    If what i believe is right - what can be fixed first without too much fuss and money, Or should I just have them tear the Engine down and put in new valve guides, rings, etc.

    The car runs great otherwise - it's very annoying to put oil in the car every 1000 miles. If it was every 3000-5000 miles then I would have no problems, but this is a BMW - it's supposedly engineered to go 300K - having this happen at 117K is bothersome to say the least.

    Looking forward to your help.

    Regards

    Manny Mateus :confuse:
  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 45,990
    Well GEESH, someone has to do a cylinder leakdown test and then you'll have good quantitative data and some data for making the right decision.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,949
    Sure, you could have someone tear down that engine, hone the cylinders, put in new rings etc. You could easilly spend 4000.00 and turn your 1000 mile per quart BMW into a 3000 mile per quart oil burner.

    Do you really think it's worth the expense?

    For me, simply adding a quart of 1.50 oil once a month isn't a big deal.

    And I don't like their reccomendation of using a heavyweight oil to mask the problem. 10-60?? Never heard of the stuff?
  • wtd44wtd44 Posts: 1,211
    And why would 10W-60 oil significantly slow the burning? The designator indicates the basic oil is 10 weight, and has elastomers added to cause it to simulate 60 weight during full high temperature running. To top it off, I've read that some manufacturers consider 1 quart per 1000 miles to be acceptable oil consumption.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,949
    All cars use SOME oil. They have to. To me, 1000 miles isn't a big deal at all.

    Just check it often to make sure it doesn't get worse.

    I remember I once had a Chevy that used a quart every 700-1000 miles like clockwork. I kept that Chevy five years and it never changed. Ran like a top too!
  • wtd44wtd44 Posts: 1,211
    Back in the Dark Ages, I had a '55 Chevy V8 that deteriorated down to 50 miles per quart as I crippled in to my folks house on a college Christmas break. I spent most of my available time that two weeks rebuilding the engine in their garage, under my father's tutelage. We got it together and I drove it the 900 miles back to school.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,949
    The Chevy I had was a '62 Impala SS with a 300 HP 327.

    Beautiful car that just liked a quart of oil once in awhile.
  • wtd44wtd44 Posts: 1,211
    I never had an Impala of any year. My '55 Belair needed a bench bore, but there was neither time or inclination to remove the block from the frame. I sat on the fenders and ran a hone seemingly forever (after ridge reaming, of course) to ready the cylinders for used pistons I bought at a junk yard, fitted with brand new extra-wide land area rings to take up the space. I hand fit the rings for each cylinder, as you would expect. I left the crank journals alone and replaced the babbitt in the big ends of the rods. This "parts exchange" did me good for another 25K miles, at which time the ol' engine got skunky again. I sold/junked the car to an old friend whose family owned a repair garage business.
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,949
    When I was a kid I was once so broke I had to buy brake shoes at a junkyard!
  • :cry: can you use a analog voltmeter to do diagnostics on a 96' 2.4 stratus? if so, how?? my stratus just stopped running!!! no no engine trouble light comes on, it turns over and sounds like it wants to start but won't?????????replaced timing belt about 500 miles ago and just replaced coil. my tach seemed to quit working just before it stalled???? any and all help will be appreciated :
  • 10W-60 is a 60 weight oil, with polymers to simulate a 10 weight in cold temperatures.

    W does not stand for weight, it stands for winter, meaning that an oil with a W is suitable for use in winter.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "10W-60 is a 60 weight oil, with polymers to simulate a 10 weight in cold temperatures.

    W does not stand for weight, it stands for winter, meaning that an oil with a W is suitable for use in winter."


    Ummm, no. You have it exactly backwards. 10W-60 oil is a 10 weight oil ("W" does NOT stand for winter) that is stable enough that when hot it only thins out to the viscosity of a straight 60 weight oil. There are two methods of stabilizing thin oils (take your pick, 0W-30, 0W-40, 15W-50, 10W-60... it doesn't matter). The first is to add what are generally termed "Viscosity Improvers" (VIs), and the second is to produce an oil from a fully synthetic base. Most middle of the road oils (Motorcraft 5W-20 for instance) use some synthetic PAO and some VIs to achieve the desired result.

    FWIW, while formulations are a tightly kept secret by all manufacturers, it is believed that some oils, Mobil 1 0W-40 for instance, are formulated with such a high quality PAO base that they need no VIs to achieve their classification.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • leonchinleonchin Posts: 10
    im here just want to learn more about car
    but i think it will be easy for me to learn it
    because i really know nothing about this, any word from you will make me progress
    thank you very much
  • bkrellbkrell Posts: 4
    "Ummm, no. You have it exactly backwards. 10W-60 oil is a 10 weight oil ("W" does NOT stand for winter) that is stable enough that when hot it only thins out to the viscosity of a straight 60 weight oil."

    Kinda. They are two separate measurements. The "W" may as well stand for winter as it is valid only in comparison to other "W" or cold measurements. Yes, of course the oil thins when it warms up, though.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    "The "W" may as well stand for winter as it is valid only in comparison to other "W" or cold measurements."

    Sorry, the "W" never has and never will stand for "Winter".

    As for your assertion that the "W" number is only good for comparison to other "W" numbers, not true either. It is as I stated before. A 10W-60 will flow like a 10W straight weight oil when cold and like a 60W straight weight oil when up to operating temperatures.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • bkrellbkrell Posts: 4
    Sorry, the "W" never has and never will stand for "Winter".

    As for your assertion that the "W" number is only good for comparison to other "W" numbers, not true either. It is as I stated before. A 10W-60 will flow like a 10W straight weight oil when cold and like a 60W straight weight oil when up to operating temperatures.


    Incorrect. You are insinuating that the oil thickens as it heats up. That is simply not the case. By your logic, a cold bottle of 20W50 should flow the same as 0W20 right out of a hot oil pan. Care to try that experiment?
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Shipo,

    Sorry, you actually have it backwards, and the original poster was correct. 90 is thicker oil than 10. Oil thickens when it is gets cold below it's normal operating temperature. SAE 30 is standard 30 weight oil, that would thicken to become something higher at freezing temperatures. 10W30 is a 30 weight oil (at normal operating temperatures), and is formulated so that at lower temperatures it acts like an 10 weight oil (thickening up to a 30 weight oil). I've always known the "W" to stand for "Winter", which seems to match how Valvoline defines it as well.

    Oil Viscosity reference 1

    Oil Viscosity reference 2
  • bkrellbkrell Posts: 4
    But please understand folks, there are at least two different tests used to determine the designation of a multigrade oil. There is a test at operating temps which determines the high number and a different one at cold temps to determine the first, low number. For example, you can't just say, flows like a 10W when cold and a 30W when hot. You CAN say flows like a 10W when cold and a 30 when hot.

    Here's Noria's definition of SAE viscosity:

    " The viscosity classification of a motor oil according to the system developed by the Society of Automotive Engineers and now in general use. “Winter” grades are defined by viscosity measurements at low temperatures and have “W” as a suffix, while “Summer” grades are defined by viscosity at 100ํํํํํํํ°ํ C and have no suffix. Multigrade oils meet both a winter and a summer definition and have designations such as SAE 10W-30, etc. "
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Guys, like it or not, the use of stable PAO based oils and/or Viscosity Improvers allow a multigrade oil to perform like a thin straight weight oil when cold and a thick straight weight oil when hot. THAT IS NOT TO SAY THAT SAID MULTIWEIGHT OIL IS THINNER WHEN COLD THAN WHEN HOT. What you two seem to not understand is that multigrade oil does not thin as much as a straight weigh oil AS IT GETS HOT, hence the multigrade rating. Said another way, the 10W-60 that's being thrown around here will flow like a straight 10 weight oil at zero degrees centigrade, and like a the same as a straight 60 weight oil at 100 degrees centigrade.

    kiawah,

    The two articles you referenced are so full of half truths, contradictions and errors that I don't know where to begin, so I won't. Instead, please refer to a far more credible source, namely the API.

    http://www.api.org/certifications/engineoil/pubs/upload/AppF-REV-03-15-07.pdf

    Also, if you are a member of the SAE International (Society of Automotive Engineers), there are literally thousands of technical publications on multigrade oil that you could view and learn from.

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
  • bkrellbkrell Posts: 4
    Perhaps I misunderstood your statement. No worries. I've plenty of SAE material to go around.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Can you say, "SCAM-O-RAMA"? Sure, I knew you could. ;-)

    The bilge water that article is championing is made with the exact same primary ingredients as the world renowned Slick 50 product, namely Teflon. Like it or not, Teflon is a solid and is removed from the engine oil by the oil filter (at least until it clogs the filter) before it gets to the cylinder walls.

    Said another way, Alemite CD-2 is just another bottle of "me-too" snake oil, produced and sold by folks more interested in separating you from your hard earned money than helping you with a problematic engine. :P

    Best Regards,
    Shipo
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