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Ford Focus: MPG-Real World Numbers

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  • It should not make that much difference in mileage being a four cylinder. Besides, I haven't heard the spokesperson for Ford give stipulations to the 40 mpg that they advertise on their brand.
    I previosly exceeded mpg on a Mazda3 with a four cylinder engine. Hopefully my mileage of average 29.48 will improve with the adjustments Ford did for my focus se hatcbback. That rating was an average of 5 fillups of 100% gasoline with 80% driving on 4 lane highway. I'm hoping for the best! They did get my sync system to operating properly so that was an improvemet.
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    "It should not make that much difference in mileage being a four cylinder."

    In my experience with my cars it does. The 4-banger just generally has to work harder to move that mass around town. And to run the a/c.

    "Besides, I haven't heard the spokesperson for Ford give stipulations to the 40 mpg that they advertise on their brand."

    Ha ha, that's funny. When have you ever heard a manufacturer make real world stipulations about the EPA ratings of their cars? That's the reason for the lawsuits surrounding the Honda Civic electric and the Hyundai Elantra.

    "I previosly exceeded mpg on a Mazda3 with a four cylinder engine. Hopefully my mileage of average 29.48 will improve with the adjustments Ford did for my focus se hatcbback. That rating was an average of 5 fillups of 100% gasoline with 80% driving on 4 lane highway. I'm hoping for the best! "

    Well you're exceeding the Focus's city rating anyway. Depends on how many stops you have on the 4-lane highway - are you talking about an interstate or a suburban/country road? Mileage will improve over the first couple thousand miles as the tires wear down a little and the engine internals break in, reducing friction.
  • Seriously, there is no good way to spin getting 19 mpg on a 2012 Ford Focus. Mileage may vary, driving habits, blah, blah blah. Engine needs broken in----- then buy my gas until it is broken in. I am not asking for the mileage that you guys are getting. Honestly a combined 25 mpg would thrill me. Absolutely no way I would have bought this car if I knew 19 -20 mpg was all I was going to get. I drove about 80 highway miles on Sunday and the mileage went up a little but now is back down.
    maybe I just got a bad one??????
    For those of you getting in the thirties can you honestly tell me that you were getting only 19 when you first bought the car?
  • I agree with you wholheartedly!
  • revssrevss Posts: 20
    I'm with you John.

    I purchased this car based on the published EPA numbers and figured I'd get close to them but not entirely miss them. I do most of my driving in the city and I get between 20-21. When I do highway I may get about 27. I've tracked my mileage since April and I'm averaging about 21 MPG with 2400 miles on the car. I love this car I do but the mileage currently sucks. Once it reaches 3K I'm turning it over to the dealer to have them really look at it.
  • revssrevss Posts: 20
    John,

    which model Focus do you have? I have the Titanium.
  • I have the SE. The thing that gets me is that everybody keps telling me at Ford or the dealer that , "mileage may vary, the car needs broken in , and driving habits...... (means you suck at driving.) I just want a car that is going to get more than 240 miles on a 12 gallon fill up. 300 would be great. that would 25 mpg combined. i could live with that.
  • revssrevss Posts: 20
    Thats EXACTLY how I feel. The break in period, as stated in the manual, is 1000. I've been told by my dealer its at least 7,500 which is my first service. My friend who purchased a 2010 AWD four cylinder Subaru Outback gets better gas mileage than I do! I should at least be getting 300 MPG out of a tank of gas. I'm getting the same MPG as my 2007 Honda Odysee which is about right for that vehicle. Not this one!
  • So I went to the dealership and talked to the sales manager. I knew it was a bad idea because he doesn't have the power to really do anything. I let the salesman talk me into meeting him. First thing he does is roll his eyes, smirks and says the car needs broken in. Then he says we can get it into service next week. Gee thanks.
    I leave pissed. As I am about to leave he stops me and tries to talk to me. He says I am computing it wrong and I am getting a combined 22 mpg (first of all i am not wrong, second even if he is right, [he isn't, btw] big whoop on 22 mpg combined.) He tells me that I am not understanding the point. I told him that I am very intelligent and that he is treating me like a [non-permissible content removed]. He says very angrily, "there is just no talking to you!!!!!" I said, "You're an [non-permissible content removed], hows that?" and left.
    So I was almost out of gas and being very stupid decide to run to empty to get a real gas mileage reading. I ran out of gas at 249 miles from the last fill up. Btw that includes 80 miles of straight highway at 60-65 mph driving. So I have exact numbers but I am being unreasonable because I refuse to wait for the car to break in. A mechanic at the dealership actually said it would take up to 9000 miles to get the car broken in.
    He said it was a learning transmission and that I needed to understand that. (the sales manager not the mechanic said that. )
    Anyway this is my last post on the subject until I get 3000 miles on the car. Either that or trade it in before that. I will let you guys know.
    Honestly I hope I am wrong and the car gets 30 mpg combined. in this case my wallet saving gas money trumps my ego on being right!!!!!! But in the meantime, Ford owes me some gas money!!!!!
  • revssrevss Posts: 20
    Hey there,

    I;d actually like to stay in contact with you as I am having the EXACT same issue. Just not sure how to go about doing this. This forum doesn't seem to allow for private messages??

    Ron.
  • Ron, I just joined a Ford Focus forum that has private messaging. Here is the thread that I started:
    http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?t=294273

    Maybe you could join and post in that thread.
    Btw, everybody I don't want to hate my Focus. I am just concerned especially after talking to a lot of other Focus owners who are in the same boat as me (not just here)
  • PF_FlyerPF_Flyer Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,913
    All you have to do to allow other registered Edmunds forums members (and ONLY registered members) to contact you directly is to click on the Forums Preferences link that you'll find in a box at the top right of any forums page that you're on. Then change your E-mail Setting to "public". That way, any registered forums user can click on your username and contact you via email.

    MODERATOR
    Need help navigating? pf_flyer@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.
    Share your vehicle reviews

  • revssrevss Posts: 20
    Yeah I understand. It would just be nice to have a private message feature that leverages a built in messaging system instead of broadcasting your email out even to registered users.
  • Three things happened on Thursday that made me change direction. First I googled "real world gas mileage," The first result was a Consumer Report's " 'real world' gas mileage test results."
    The Focus SE finished 12th in it's class. The City mileage? 18 mpg!!!!! To be fair the highway mileage was outstanding at 43. But most of my driving is city. Not only city but the worst driving conditions you can imagine: Lots of traffic, a TON of stoplights insane hills, tunnels inside of mountains that produce long lines of just waiting and terrible merge points that tie up and/or slow down traffic.
    As far as the car "breaking in", I am a firm believer that the very most improvement on mileage after the car is broken in is 20%. Not enough to satisfy because the only reason I bought the car was to save on gas.
    The second thing was that the car (once again) sputtered and hesitated going up a steep hill. Despite its 160 horses, the car just doesn't have the oomph needed for my driving. It was "funny" to see the avg mpg on the computer go down several miles as I was going up the hill.
    I just don't like the transmission.
    Third was pulling on to the main street from my neighborhood. There is a sharp bend on the main road right where we need to pull out. So you need to make sure it is clear as best you can and then press on the gas and go. Hesitated again, and a car was coming around the bend very fast. Not a comfortable situation.
    So, I said screw it. I drove to the Toyota dealer and traded it in for a Corolla. It had the best combination of price and "real world" city mpg that I could get. I lost some on the Focus but with the finance rate I got, The payment was only a little higher. I did put a thousand down, though. That sucked because I put 1500 down on the Focus. The dealer offered a lifetime powertrain warranty though.
    To be fair, I have a 2007 Focus that I beat pretty good and it gets very good mileage and has more than suffecient power. It has 60k miles on it. I use it for work (mostly my head cook uses it,tbh) This 2012 is nowhere near that car. Second, I just don't think this was the right car for me and my driving conditions. If I was on a flat land with less stop and go I am sure I would have done better.
    After 5 full days I am happy with the Corolla. I will post my ending mileage on the first full tank when it gets to zero. According to the computer I am on pace for 340 miles on a 13.2 gallon tank. This is the same city driving I did with the Focus (without the straight 80 highway miles.) My guess is going to be about 310-320 when it is said and done. So that means 60- 70 miles more on a .8 gallon bigger tank. It has suffecient power for the little engine it has and I can drive without worrying about having to "baby" it or put in 93 Octane gas.
    This is my first Toyota. I hope it lives up to my expectations. So far so good but we will see.
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    "Three things happened on Thursday that made me change direction..."

    I would love it if you could do an unimotional comparison of the Corolla and the Focus over a few tanks of gas and document that you get significantly better gas mileage with the EXACT driving habits and routes. That would be very interesting. Because as I showed you on focusfanatics.com, the Corolla is just as subject to getting low fuel economy as the Focus is in extreme city driving conditions.

    If you look on fuelly.com, the overall average mileage of current gen Focus owners is slightly more than the overall average mileage of current gen Corolla owners, even given the Focus's significantly higher horsepower and much better driving dynamics.

    Regarding the consumer reports data you found, the more important number to most folks is the combined overall mileage they got with the Focus. It was right in the middle of the compact class despite the Focus having the most horsepower and quickest acceleration (according to CR testing) of the class. That's pretty impressive.

    Based on all this it seems clear to me that either you will get low fuel economy with any car you drive because of your particular route and habits, or there was something mechanically wrong with your particular Focus that could have eventually been solved.
  • To be honest (I really mean it) I agree with just about everything you wrote.
    The thing is, if you remember my posts on the other site, the ONLY reason I bought the car was for the mileage. So I figured if I wouldn't get the mileage I didn't want a car that I didn't like.
    I 100% agree that I can get a bad car from anybody. I do agree that there may have been something wrong with that Focus. The problem is getting Ford or the dealer to understand and appreciate my concerns was a losing battle. Only the salesman cared at the dealer and at Ford, nobody cared at all.
    I didn't want to post on the other forum because the name of it is "focusfanatics," I figure I would get lambasted there. I guess you saw that somebody else posted the same stuff I did about the mileage.
    There is no emotion left in me on the subject. I'm cool. It's over. I will post more when I go through a whole tank of gas. The thing is though, even if the mileage ends up being the same I think I will be happier with the Corolla because of the performance.
    Reminder--- I really like my 2007 Focus. I don't hate Ford and it pained me to buy a Japanese car. I respect that Ford is American and they didn't take bail out money. Plus the Ford dealer is a mile away from my house. I wanted it to work. Plus the interior is nicer on the Focus and I also like the exterior look of it over the Corolla.
    Last thing about dealing with Ford...... they seemed relieved to get rid of me as a customer. No help at all. They ignored my requests to speak to anyone with any kind of power, not even their immediate supervisor.
    The dealer was no help at all.
    With my hectic life (mom and pop restaurant owner [75 hours a week] with two young children) sometimes it is easier for me to throw money on the problem rather than wait for the solution.
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    "With my hectic life (mom and pop restaurant owner [75 hours a week] with two young children) sometimes it is easier for me to throw money on the problem rather than wait for the solution. "

    Well I sympathize with you on that. It usually is tough to work fighting with a dealer into a busy schedule. Sounds like you got a bad dealer though. Might've been worth it to try another.

    Not sure how the Corolla's performance can compare given it's got 128 hp and 4 speeds versus the Focus's 160 hp and 6 speeds. Your Focus's dual clutch automatic may have been a little sluggish during break in (e.g. going up the hill you mentioned) but most owners report that it smooths out and performs great over time, and performs much better than any conventional torque converter automatic (e.g. the Corolla's).

    Even Edmunds says the Corolla has "mediocre acceleration and fuel economy."

    Anyways, best of luck to you and your family. Don't know if you considered it but the thousands $$$ you say you lost on the trade would have paid for a lot of the gas you think the Focus uses in excess of the Corolla.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    At the end of the day, it doesn't sound like it came down to the FE by itself. Based on my experience with that automatic transmission, I think John's driving conditions are the worst scenario for it. I spent a few days in Morgantown, WV (lots of steep hills and stop/go traffic), with an automatic Fiesta a few months ago, and that car would have driven me crazy if I owned it and lived there. Were it manual, I'm sure my impression of its hilly city manners would have been far better.

    It was lovely on the highway though, and returned a combined FE of nearly 42mpg in 25/75 driving (city/highway, respectively).
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • "At the end of the day, it doesn't sound like it came down to the FE by itself. Based on my experience with that automatic transmission, I think John's driving conditions are the worst scenario for it. I spent a few days in Morgantown, WV (lots of steep hills and stop/go traffic), with an automatic Fiesta a few months ago, and that car would have driven me crazy if I owned it and lived there. Were it manual, I'm sure my impression of its hilly city manners would have been far better.

    It was lovely on the highway though, and returned a combined FE of nearly 42mpg in 25/75 driving (city/highway, respectively)."

    LOL, I am from Pittsburgh!!!! Mogantown is about 75 miles south from me. Pgh is like Morgantown on steroids and lots of them. Plus we have those tunnels, etc....
    It's funny to me the statement you made because i kept on saying that where I live this car NEEDS to be a real manual transmission, not this automatically controlled stick !!!! I never said anything because I thought people wouldn't understand and think I was crazy or stupid!!!!!
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    Hilarious! Nope; I don't think you're crazy at all. The MT would have been a better fit for the conditions. Even if your Corolla doesn't get better FE, I suspect that its transmission, even though it is viewed as old-fashioned, will perform much better in that environment.

    I flew into Pittsburgh (my first time there, even though my wife is from Meadville), and drove to Morgantown and back. I specifically requested the Fiesta because I'm considering it to buy and thought this would work out as an extended test drive (though I wouldn't consider buying an automatic, regardless of type).

    I was surprised at how hilly the area was. Even on the interstate, there were some pretty decent grades. The problem with the transmission is that it operates like a manual, but it cannot anticipate conditions like a driver can - it only reacts. I swear I would have ended up with whiplash had I driven through many more dimly-lit parking garages at 5mph. Also, it certainly didn't seem overly responsive off an initial start, at least from my perspective having driven "slushbox" automatics at various times in the past. Once you started it moving, though, it would get up and go pretty well. I generally let off the brake, let the car engage some forward momentum for a second, then get into it.

    Aside from the transmission, the car was really fantastic. It was quiet, well-planted, peppy-ish (much more so with the MT), good visibility, and great fuel economy.

    I'm looking at the Focus now, too, though, since they now offer it throughout the trim levels with a MT. And, it is only rated a couple MPG lower on FE than the Fiesta, but with quite a bit more cargo volume.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • al63017al63017 Posts: 149
    I read with interest what you said below and I always thought if the dealer you bought from did not help another dealer would even be less help. Do people actually go to other dealers if the bought from does not help? I would like to think you could but just never thought thought it was possible.

    "Well I sympathize with you on that. It usually is tough to work fighting with a dealer into a busy schedule. Sounds like you got a bad dealer though. Might've been worth it to try another."

    Thanks
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    Sure you can. I get my cars serviced at the nearest Ford dealer even though I've never bought a car from them. They still get paid by Ford for warranty work so they're happy to work on your car regardless of where you bought it from.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    Same here. I always try to buy my cars locally, but the local dealers apparently have their inventory plated with gold before the paint goes on. So, I usually end up buying in Seattle and flying down to bring it home, but warranty work is still done at the local dealer.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    "The problem with the transmission is that it operates like a manual, but it cannot anticipate conditions like a driver can - it only reacts. "

    Spoken like a true lifelong manual driver. You just described every slushbox in 95% of cars sold, like, ever.

    Now I understand the dual clutch transmission is not at its best in some circumstances, particularly bumper to bumper traffic. But hilly terrain? You guys do realize most Focuses (except for the basic stripped down models) come with Select Shift, or manual shifting mode? So that you, the driver can anticipate upcoming hills and downshift as appropriate? Seems like that would've solved the problem of the hilly terrain.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    I don't know about the select shift. I'm not sure the Fiesta I used had it and, if it did, I didn't notice it during that short time.

    The dual clutch is a bit different than many other automatics, including CVTs, in that it has an "engage" vs. "disengage" aspect. That's the primary problem with transitioning from a stop or going at extremely slow speeds. When starting, it has a delay in engagement from the moment of input, and at very slow speeds, it quickly does an engage/disengage cycling that can be noticeably felt. It isn't harsh, per se, but I sure found it annoying. I guess the best way to describe both issues is that the car doesn't feather the clutch.

    Like I said, it worked well for me overall, and it didn't have any problems traversing hilly terrain. The hilly terrain in a city environment just made the start/stop traits more pronounced. My opinion is that the DCT automatic is the worst transmission choice for John's driving conditions.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    Correct, there is no torque converter in this transmission like there would be in a conventional automatic so there's no fluid damping of the connection / disconnection of the engine / transmission. It's just like any other manual transmission, the clutch is engaged, disengaged, or slipping a little which I understand the DCT is designed to minimize because it's hard on the clutch.

    The main benefit is fuel economy and feeling more connected to the engine. Look at the new Dart with its similar 160hp 2L engine BUT conventional 6-speed automatic - it's only rated at 24/27/34 mpg versus the Focus's 28/31/38.

    Ford's Select Shift is standard on most Focus trim levels / option packages. I imagine it would be perfect for hilly terrain where you'd want to downshift before you get to the uphill grade.
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    I agree that it has a noticeable impact on fuel economy. Just the fact that the automatic is rated higher than the manual in EPA testing is evidence enough of that. Often, too, do CVT automatics that don't experience the loss of efficiency through a torque converter. Real world reports don't necessarily mirror EPA results in that regard, but at least if you're paying more for the transmission, you aren't taking a FE hit to go along with it.

    Paddle shifters are nice for allowing additional driver input into the selected ratio.
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • kam327kam327 Posts: 115
    Yep, the CVT is how the new Altima gets the same EPA ratings as the Focus despite being larger, heavier and more powerful. And looks like Honda's going the CVT route. Too bad they're so unpleasant to drive!
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,582
    I have little experience with them. I did do a test-drive on a Legacy 2.5i Limited last year just to try out the transmission, and I found it very nice for an automatic. Twenty minutes can only tell you so much, though. It was smooth as butter, but definitely felt much different than any other auto transmission. As far as familiarity of feel, I didn't find the DCT all that different from a torque converter, but it sure sounded different when it shifted gears.

    I like the frequent inclusion of "manumatic" modes on today's automatic transmission choices, especially when it is my car (in other words, I use it day in and day out rather than just a test drive or rental), but it isn't a substitute for a manual transmission.

    When the FE numbers are significantly higher on the automatic, though, such as on the new Subaru offerings, it sure makes me pause and justify how much I prefer the MT as compared to the potential hit I'll take at the pump over the long term.

    Some of the differences, like with the Focus, are negligible if any. Others, like with Subaru, are likely to be reflected in real world experience. With the right gearing, though, that would never be an issue. :cry:
    2010 Subaru Forester, 2011 Ford Fiesta, 1969 Chevrolet C20 Pickup, 1969 Ford Econoline 100, 1976 Ford F250 Pickup, 1974 Ford Pinto Wagon
  • danjerqdanjerq Posts: 1
    My 2012 Focus is currently getting 31.2 mpg..or Averaging 7.2 liters per 100km..not the 54 mpg they claim on the window sticker..The salesman dont bother complaining until youve had it for at least a year they wont look at it for that reason
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