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Hyundai Elantra Real World MPG 2011 MY and earlier

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Comments

  • I have read CR reports on the Elantra and the Civic. While I don't give heavy reliance on CR they are an important source for car buying information. They were very inpressed with the Civis's gas milage and reliability. However they were so not impressed with the car as to not put it on the recommended list. But they did put the Elantra on the top of the reocmmended list. If you believe in CR then you bought the right car.
  • steven39steven39 Posts: 636
    beleive it or not,i purchased my 2012 hyundai elantra gls based on CR reviews.everything that they said about the car was evident on the test drive.handleing,engine and tranny performance,interior design,ect..usually,when CR recommends a car you can bet that the car is a winner.
  • david_r2david_r2 Posts: 1
    edited October 2011
    I've been doing the 10 miles plus on an Interstate, using cruise in good weather test in my 2011 Elantra a few times recently. I've found that for me the difference between sticking to the 65 mph speed limit and going 5 mph over (70) makes a tremendous difference in your mileage. I have consistently gotten 38 mpg at a constant 70 mph but 43 average adhering strictly to 65 mph. I'll bet I could go up to 45 mpg easily driving 62 mph, but I'm afraid I'm just not that patient a person.

    I've never heard wind as a factor discussed, although I just signed on here. When I knew I was driving into a maybe 10 mph wind I was getting 39 mph at the speed limit. Taking the same route back on the interstate with the wind I got 43.

    Another fairly obvious factor, speeding up to pass cars quickly, cuts down on your mileage. Pass a car in 5 seconds - really poor mpg; pass a car in 10 seconds, much, much better on the mpg.

    I have a distinct feeling that some folks here are really not aware of some of these factors.
  • m6userm6user Posts: 3,006
    Good post except for the bit about "never heard wind as a factor discussed, although I just signed on here". :confuse:

    It's discussed all the time in these forums. Both wind(blowing kind) and wind resistance. It's long been accepted that after about 55 mph(without a headwind) wind resistance is a major player. Now cars have gotten a lot more aerodynamic in recent years and cut through the air better but wind resistance is still a big factor. I'm also convinced that these small engines and multispeed trannies are more affected by wind and wind resistance than the bigger engines and 4 & 5 speed auto trannies. I can't prove this but it just seems logical to me. It seems the smaller the car/engine and more speeds to the tranny makes it harder to achieve high mpg at higher speeds. Stay down around 55-62 like you mentioned and I believe mpg could blow the EPA highway numbers away. I think everyone knows that anytime you floor it to pass versus a calm steady pass affects mpg a lot but conveniently don't think about it much when they figure their mpg.
  • roadscholar3roadscholar3 Posts: 23
    edited October 2011
    My new Elantra has about 800 miles on it. I drive a lot of highway miles which is why I
    went ahead and got this car rather than a hybrid. During the period of this test I would
    say I drove about 35%/65% (city/hwy). Where I live there is rarely any stop & go traffic
    in town so my 'city' driving is less intensive than in most places with a lot of traffic. I was more optimistic than when I originally posted here because when I got on the highway and got up to speed I reset the mpg setting, set the cruise control to 65mph and got readings as low as 36 mpg and as high as 43. So I was prepared to be pleasantly surprised with the overall outcome.
    But when I refilled the tank today and did my calculations I was only getting an average of 29.6 mpg.

    So I'm sad to report I'm still unhappy and do wish I'd made another car choice. While I have no other complaints as yet about the rest of the car, fuel efficiency is very important to me and I doubt I'll be getting another Hyundai. And I've become very skeptical about reported mpg ratings in general.

    I'll continue to do these mpg tests intermittently and will report back here if there is a significant change.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,733
    Just did a search within 50 miles of me for Priuses under $18k. Found 43 (that was just on one site), with miles as low as 25k and as new as 2009. Some are Toyota Certified. Given the popularity of the Elantra right now, maybe you could find a dealer that would do an even-up trade for your nearly-new Elantra. Just pay license/title and away you go, getting the hybrid-style fuel economy you want.
  • roadscholar3roadscholar3 Posts: 23
    edited October 2011
    I hadn't thought of that! Thanks so much for the suggestion. I'm going to go look
    online right now.
  • roadscholar3roadscholar3 Posts: 23
    edited October 2011
    I think road noise tolerance is a personal thing that only you can determine. Doing a test drive should answer your question real quick. Depends on tolerance level, what you're used to, etc. It doesn't bother me but it might bother you.
  • pbm58pbm58 Posts: 16
    I agree--am not even getting low end of EPA estimate...thus far, calculated on 2 tank fill-ups, I'm at 21 city (!!!!) and 29 hway. Clearly, I would not even have considered this car had I known these figures, as I too purchase only for reliability and fuel efficiency. This is the kind of mpg I expected a decade ago...
    actually, my decade old car was still getting average 37 mpg's. Hyundai Corporate suggests I not idle nor use the AC.
    I am trying to get out of my lease.
  • pbm58pbm58 Posts: 16
    Exactly, mb21784--I just had a 9 1/2 yr old car still getting 37 mpg's. I am also driving this Elantra much more carefully to try and get even tolerable mpg's...no dice. Why aren't we all notifying the company? Corporate seems to think it is the fault of the individual driver, whereas, I sense a pattern here...currently, I am striving for 28 mpgs average (not sure how that will happen as I am at 21/29 currently), or trying to cancel my lease. I have too have never had a vehicle that wasn't near what was expected--esp as they changed the EPA calculations a few yrs back to better reflect reality for the potential buyer....
  • rudy66rudy66 Posts: 26
    Me too. 21-23 mpg in city. Screw it. I am not even going to try to drive in such a manner to get the advertised mpg any more. I'm going to enjoy the car and trade away from a Hyundai in a couple of years. Don't use the AC - are they crazy???
  • rudy66rudy66 Posts: 26
    Me too. 21-23 mpg in city. Screw it. I am not even going to try to drive in such a manner to get the advertised mpg any more. I'm going to enjoy the car and trade away from a Hyundai in a couple of years. Don't use the AC - are they crazy???
  • pbm58pbm58 Posts: 16
    Hey dissatisfied Elantra folks--register your mpg's on this site and compare with others (right now, only 12 folks are on there, so average not accurate:
    https://www.fueleconomy.gov/mpg/
  • Same Problem. 1000 miles so far, 70 highway miles per day with 2 miles to the highway, cruisecontrol at 65, first tank 29.5 mpg, second tank 31.5 mpg babying it. Hardly close to 40 mpg. Extremely dissapointed. Going to be very vocal about it. Bad press goes a long way.
  • Oh for gods sakes. How many times have people on this thread said GIVE IT TIME?

    Just relax...you'll see it increase over time.
  • pbm58pbm58 Posts: 16
    I agree--be VERY vocal...something is amiss...company tells me I need a "break-in" of 600 miles, but now I am long past that (still at 21/29). Meanwhile, service manager says wait 2500...what gives?
  • Seems like most are getting way below sticker as far as MPG. I'm getting 22 MPG in a mix of city and highway driving. Oh, by the way my trunk leaks. Anyone else having the leaking problem? I have a feeling this MPG concern is headed toward a CLASS ACTION legal remedy.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,733
    Seems like most are getting way below sticker as far as MPG.

    How did you figure that? Over 160,000 2011-12 Elantras have been sold in the US this year alone. I don't see anything close to 80,000 people saying they are getting way below sticker on MPG. Do you realize that if 15,000 people complained about mpg on the Elantra, that's less than 10% of all owners, not including the 2011s sold last year?
  • Seems like most are getting way below sticker as far as MPG. I'm getting 22 MPG in a mix of city and highway driving. Oh, by the way my trunk leaks. Anyone else having the leaking problem? I have a feeling this MPG concern is headed toward a CLASS ACTION legal remedy.

    If you think the EPA ratings are guaranteed please read the following:

    link title

    Your mileage may vary
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,896
    I have a feeling this MPG concern is headed toward a CLASS ACTION legal remedy.

    Who on earth do you think people are going to sue? Hyundai doesn't just get to decide what estimated MPG goes on the sticker (or in advertising). Those numbers come from the US EPA, not the manufacturer.

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  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    edited November 2011
    Kirstie-

    When you advertise 40mpg and engineer a car to get 40mpg, people do have a right to sue. Do you think it is any coincodence that the recent slew of new Hyundai's are estimated to get 40mpg by accident? I think not....

    It's not whether the suit is valid in a court of law as it is people want to have a say that they were mislead. T

    It's quite obvious that Hyundai engineered their cars to beat an EPA test, rather than actually get real-world mpg's.
  • backybacky Twin CitiesPosts: 18,733
    Just curious... when you drove the 2011-12 Elantra, what was your mpg? And what were the conditions?
  • It's a waste of time Backy, no one bothers to read any of the fine print under that 29/40, plus they don't care what the EPA rates it at, it's all Hyundai's fault, not anybody else's. So, lets sue, I need the buxx and they have plenty. I think it's a big case of buyer remorse. Go over to the other forum's, an you'll find sometimes the same people complaining that their Focus, Mazda3, Fiesta, whatever isn't getting what they advertise it to get. If I was that un-happy with my 2011 elantra, I'd get rid of it, but, seeing I get 33-35 combined, mostly in a rural area. On a few 725 mile round trip drives to Tennessee, we got 44.1 on the hwy. we were doing 65-70. Some just like to whine.
  • mikestoy5

    I have to agree with you. The thing that all these owners conplaining about mpg are missing is that they purchased one of the best compact sedans available. Enjoy your car.
  • I've got over 4000 miles on my 2012 Elantra and the mileage is NOT getting any better. The computer based Avg Mpg is getting better, but when you do the math after filling up it is wrong. Right now I get about 3mpg below the computers numbers. As I said in an earlier post you will have to learn to drive this car a certain way if you want to get even close to the advertised MPG.

    I used CR, Motor Trend, and personal driving to help make my decision about the Elantra. For the money it is a well equipped and well appointed car. However, I was expecting better average mpg. In the Motor Trend review they commented that they could not get the advertised mileage. I read that and thought that not paying the premium (+/- $2K) for the Civic would make up for the difference. Now, experience shows that I will eat up that premium long before I can afford to get rid of the car.

    I'm pretty sure we all understand how the mileage estimates are derived by the EPA and Hyundai. However, when the car consistently delivers less than the lower estimate I think we have a problem. I hope those of you making dismissive comments about our comments are 2011/2012 Elantra owners!!

    I've owned this car since June and right now I'm on the fence about Hyundai and the Elantra. A big issue is the fuel, but I've also got some other complaints. The fuel issue (trust?) taints all the other issues as well. If I had to make a decision today I'd tell others not to buy the Elantra and to be wary of Hyundai.

    Tom
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,241
    You must drive a simply huge number of miles if the 1MPG difference in the overall average EPA ratings between a '12 Civic and a '12 Elantra were a significant factor. Assuming $3.50/gallon it'll take about 600,000 miles of driving to erase the Civic's $2K price premium.

    My wife has a '12 Elantra Limited, BTW. She bought it in September so she's only on her 2nd tank of gas (the first tank was the "free" one that came with the car).

    Out of curiosity, what are you other complaints?
  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    edited November 2011
    I have to agree with you. The thing that all these owners complaining about mpg are missing is that they purchased one of the best compact sedans available. Enjoy your car.

    What if they purchased the car on the premise that they would get the estimated fuel economy and they are not able to achieve it? I think they have a right to gripe.

    When you purchase a commodity expecting it to be one thing, and turns out to be another, it is well within their right to be disappointed.

    Suing, on the other hand, is a bit extreme. It is up to the legal system to determine if that suit is valid, not us. Personally, I do not agree with suing in cases like this, but I'm not of proper authority to tell people they can't.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,896
    Well sure, you CAN file suit against anyone you want to. The problem here would likely be getting a lawyer to take it on. Since the burden of proof is on the accuser, there would be extensive costs associated with attempting to prove that Hyundai deliberately engineered test vehicles to receive a higher EPA MPG rating, and that vehicles being sold to consumers with the EPA stickers on them are NOT the same vehicles tested by the EPA.

    Cases like this would be handled on contingency, meaning the lawyer(s) receive nothing unless they are able to successfully prove their case, and all of the "obtaining proof" costs come out of their pockets.

    Such a "rigging" scheme would be a high-risk proposition as well, as it necessarily relies on the cooperation of all individuals involved, and the non-guarantee that none of them will become a whistleblower in the future.

    I'm not saying it could never happen; just that other factors (including a potential flaw in some vehicles) are more likely to account for the disparities.

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  • aviboy97aviboy97 Posts: 3,159
    Kirstie-

    Cars are engineered to meet specific standards, such as EPA estimates and CAFE standards. Just how companies decide to reach those objectives is up to them. Engineering a vehicle to list stats on paper does not mean it will translate into real-world performance. This is nothing new. It is up to the consumer to do research, take test drives and form an opinion before they buy and if all goes well, they will not have buyers remourse. Well, that's the idea anyway. Not everyone does that, unfortunately.

    I do agree with you about law suits. In a case like this, it is pointless and does nothing but waste money. However, I have been in several forums on Edmunds where topics of class action suits come up because an owner(s) are displeased with what they purchased. People are sue happy, I guess.
  • Kirstie_HKirstie_H Posts: 10,896
    Unfortunately, many consumers genuinely believe that a class action lawsuit will bring real resolution to their problems when in fact, that's often the least productive method of getting results, at least in any timely manner.

    You're almost always better off being persistent, or working with your own legal counsel if that's the route you choose. If you have a good dealership, sometimes they can help you get action. Sometimes not.

    However, class action lawsuits tend to take years to resolve, and at the end of it all - if your side prevails - the outcome for the consumer is usually a set of options: if you still own the vehicle, you'll get some sort of "fix" to be implemented, or a gas card worth $50 (to compensate for the lost mileage) or a $500 off certificate toward the purchase of a vehicle from the same manufacturer you just sued. Not what most people have in mind when they think "class action lawsuit," but that's pretty standard.

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