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Hyundai Azera vs Toyota Avalon vs Ford Taurus vs Chevrolet Impala

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Comments

  • floridabob1floridabob1 Posts: 1,190
    I agree, most Japanese cars are very reliable. I have run cars 150,000 to 175,000 miles with minimum repairs. Most of the repairs that were required were non power train related, such as A/C, power door lock or window actuators etc.
    That is reason I added 100,000 miles bumper to bumper warranty. A/C replacement or window operators can become expensive. Labor at about $80 to $90 per hour run repair bills up fast.
  • Both the 05 and 06 Avalon are rated better than average in reliability ratings. Remember, when the 05 first came out, it had some issues that got it knocked down a step or two in CR's reliability ratings. But looks like they have improved for the 06 model.
  • captain2captain2 Posts: 3,971
    I would never own a vehicle without an extended warranty. These new "high tech" vehicles are just TOO EXPENSIVE to repair!
    would argue the opposite - whether it be mfgr. or 3rd party extended warranties, the folks offering them do make money doing it obviously because the car in question will not (on average) require an amount of repairs equal or greater to the amount charged for the warranty.
    Based on actual repair histories and repair costs, a survey of extended warranty costs gives a good indicator of how expensive a vehicle will be to operate over the longer term.
  • djm2djm2 Posts: 705
    Captain2:
    I own a 2003 Honda Accord four cylinder automatic with a 7 year 100,000 mile Honda Care extended warranty. I do a lot of driving all over the United States! My vehicle presently has 83,000 miles. To date, the Honda Care Extended Warranty has put in $3,000.00 + worth of repairs. The warranty at the time of purchase was $895.00! I think this was a "GREAT Investment"! ---- What do you think? ---- Best regards. ---- Dwayne ;) :shades: :)
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,563
    My vehicle presently has 83,000 miles. To date, the Honda Care Extended Warranty has put in $3,000.00 + worth of repairs.

    I hate to say this but I wouldn't be bragging about that.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • floridabob1floridabob1 Posts: 1,190
    Sometimes,bad things happen to good people.
    One never knows what might go wrong with a car, and the extended warranty gives peace of mind with limited down side.
  • djm2djm2 Posts: 705
    snakeweasel:
    What is your point? I had nothing to do with the quality of the component parts that failed! (AC compressor, Cat Converter, Window regulator assembly, Radio display, Motor mounts. ---etc). ---- The vehicle is serviced at the dealer every 3,000 miles. Please explain your position!------Best regards. ---- Dwayne ;) :shades: :)
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,563
    One never knows what might go wrong with a car, and the extended warranty gives peace of mind with limited down side.

    While it gives peace of mind to some I have found that in most instances an extended warranty is good money down the drain. With most cars you would be better off putting the money for the warranty in an interest bearing account and using it for any repairs.

    But my comment was on the Honda Accord with 83K miles needing at least $3K worth of warranty work.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,563
    My point is your Honda (supposively the most reliable car made) with only 83K miles on the clock has racked up at least $3k in warranty repairs. If that was my car it would be gone by now and I would be posting about it on the worst car I ever owned forum.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • captain2captain2 Posts: 3,971
    sorry to hear that you have had so much trouble with your Accord, very unusual to have 3 grand of repairs on any car in only 80k, never mind a Honda. In your particular case certainly money well spent.
    My point is if the average Honda required that $3 grand to keep it running for 100k than the warranty price would be well over that $3000, not the $895 you paid. We all have horror stories, and there is some value to peace of mind and some protection from those saboteurs otherwise known as 'mechanics'.
    My last 6 cars incidentally [3] Nissans, and [3] Suburbans total mileage - about 900,000 - total repairs $1200 for a tranny rebuild on one of the Chevys, and another coupla hundred for an alternator. My Avalon with only 40k yet to be back in the shop except for an oil leak TSB.
  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    I've had a couple of cars that received black circles in CR for reliability (1991 Ford Escort and 1999 Mercury Cougar) and I put a lot of miles on both of them (180K on Escort and 125K on Cougar). Since I put a lot of highway miles on the cars, they were "easy" miles, and the Escort was trouble-free until about 110K miles when I had to replace an alternater and water pump, and the Cougar gave me more problems (alternator at 70k miles, 110k miles and 120k miles, AC compressor at 115k miles), but in either case an extended warranty would have been a waste of $$ since the repairs (except for one alternator replacement) all occured at over 100k miles.

    I would say that for those who drive a lot of highway miles not to bother with an extended warranty (unless you're really suspicious about the reliability) because of the improved quality of cars. I actually did buy an extended warranty for my Ford Freestyle because I'm suspicious of the new CVT transmission, plus this car gets a lot of suburb driving versus all highway. I'm buying a Honda Fit to replace my Cougar and I'm definitely not bothering with an extended warranty.

    On the question of getting rid of cars once they reach 100K miles. That's fine, but in the long run more expensive. For example you buy a car for $25K and after 4 years and 100k miles it's paid off. If you trade it in and buy a new car, you're lucky to get $5K for the car because of the mileage, so now you're financing another $20K for 4 years. So in reality you're paying $5000 per year every year by trading in your 4yr old 100k mile car. Even if you put in $1000 per year in repairs, you're still better off than making your constant $5000/year in car payments. Especially with Hondas and Toyotas. Their reliability is really good and you could keep the car 10 years and $200k miles and only have to put in a few thousand over the lifetime on the car in repairs, which sure beats $5000/year in constant car payments.

    Extended warranties are really just another way for a company to make money. You buy a TV, cellphone, toaster, new home, or whatever, and there will be the offer of an extended warranty to play on your fears of the unexpected huge repair cost, but like the previous poster indicated, the fact that companies are making huge profits on extended warranties mean that they don't pay out nearly as much as they bring in.
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,563
    I've had a couple of cars that received ....

    First off I don't trust CR any further than I can throw a bull elephant. That being said in all the cars I have had (including those that had bad reliability ratings from CR) non of them would have used an extended warranty. And I have driven some of those cars rather hard.

    On the question of getting rid of cars once they reach 100K miles. That's fine, but in the long run more expensive. For example you buy a car for $25K and after 4 years and 100k miles it's paid off. If you trade it in and buy a new car, you're lucky to get $5K for the car because of the mileage, so now you're financing another $20K for 4 years.

    They typical driver will take 80 months ( six and two thirds years) to get to the 100K mark. This means that they can save up those monthly payments for an additional downpayment. Say you buy that $25K car with a 10% downpayment and pay off the loan in 5 years saving the payment for the next 20 months. When it comes time to trade in you have close to $10K saved and the $5K as a trade in. Now suppose the new car is $32.5K ($25K adjusted at an inflation rate of 4% per year) you can now buy the car at the same payments but at a loan term of one year less.

    But of course keeping the car longer makes even better financial sense.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • bobw3bobw3 Posts: 2,997
    I was trying to be conservative, but in the long run, it's always cheaper to keep the used car then keep buying new, but at some point (especially if you have a real dog), all the trips to the dealer and the uncertainity of when and where the next breakdown will occur will get people to buy a new car sooner. Or when needs change and/or there are improvements in safety. Even if I had a 15 year old car running great, I doubt if it had all of the new saftey features of a modern car, so at some point there are reasons other than cost for getting a new car.
  • captain2captain2 Posts: 3,971
    just had a conversation like this with my now gainfully employed son - his current ride a 98 Camry, paid for of course. After 150k beginning to look like it might start needing some bigger repairs, and scared of the possible size of the bills, he wants to 'solve' the problem with a $30k new car. Told him to put $700.00/mo. in his spreadsheet (payment+insurance difference), and then figure that he needs to budget $200 of that keeping it running. That was about a year ago, he has actually spent $800.00 on repairs and he went out a bought a house, instead!
  • dtownfbdtownfb Posts: 2,915
    Congratulations! You got your son on the right path to living a financially secured life. Tell him to run that Camry into the ground. yes he will have some minor repairs at that mileage but it still beats a new car payment.
  • w9cww9cw Posts: 888
    djm2 wrote: "Who would keep a vehicle for 10 years or 200K? After four years, my vehicles have 100,000 miles on them, and they are history! Reason, ---- I can only get a 100,000 mile extended factory warranty on the vehicle. I would never own a vehicle without an extended warranty. These new "high tech" vehicles are just TOO EXPENSIVE to repair!"

    I have two Classic 900 SAABs, one is 22 years old and the other 20 years old. Both have MAJOR miles on them, and I perform all maintenance. The bodies and mechanicals are in excellent condition (no major engine or transmission work as yet) - why not drive them? I'd rather put car payments or lease payments into a bank, or investment, accounts.
  • djm2djm2 Posts: 705
    w9cw:
    I have a different philosophy of life! I would rather have a "new vehicle" every three or four years, and enjoy the "creature comforts" of life. Too many of my friends are already dead! Enjoy your money, because you can't take it with you. If you save it, the "nursing home will get it", and the owners of the "home" will buy themselves a new vehicle. ---- Best regards. --------- Dwayne :shades: ;) :) :D
  • djm2djm2 Posts: 705
    snakeweasel:
    Why should I sell it before the 100,000 mile mark? Honda is picking up all the major repairs. I am riding on Honda's Dime! :shades: This is Great! All I do, is have the vehicle serviced every 3,000 miles, and the rest is Honda's responsibility. If a major component goes between 83,000 and 100,000 miles it is Honda's problem. I am ahead of the "financial game! I am a winner, in the game of extended warranties! :) --- Best regards. ---- Dwayne ;)
  • snakeweaselsnakeweasel a Certified Edmunds Poster.Posts: 11,563
    Honda is picking up all the major repairs. I am riding on Honda's Dime!

    Really? Does Honda pay you for the time you spend taking your car in and picking it up or your time waiting for your car (if you wait for it)? Does Honda pay for the inconvenience of having to take your car in? I don't think so.

    There is a greater cost to getting a car fixed than just paying for the repairs.

    If a major component goes between 83,000 and 100,000 miles it is Honda's problem.

    It is also your problem as you have to deal with a car that at best is working poorly and at worst leaves you stranded. You also have to deal with getting your car to the dealership, not having your car and picking it up. Is that Hondas problem? No thats yours.

    I tell you what, you tell me how much its Hondas problem and not yours if you are in the middle of the country 5 miles from the nearest town at 2 AM in the middle of winter when its 10 degrees out.

    I am a winner, in the game of extended warranties!

    If you want to believe that go right ahead. I rather have a car that doesn't break down.

    There are three types of people in this world. Those who are good at math and those who are not.

  • floridabob1floridabob1 Posts: 1,190
    RE; 512
    If you have owned cars that have never had a componant failure in 10 years or 100,000 miles, you are probably the first one. Congratulations!
    A/C unit replacement runs in average $2500.
    Power door locks or window activators $300-$400.
    The story goes on!
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