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Honda Accord (1990-1993) Maintenance and Repair

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Comments

  • mrbill1957mrbill1957 Posts: 814
    Actually yes, Honda listed it in the owners manuals. My 88 Accord says Dexron fluid for the transmission. I guess it was a useable substitution, but it did cause a harder shifting trans.

    For the question Fukuyama posted, I would go with what the manual says for the weight of the motor oil.

    Mrbill
  • FukuyamaFukuyama Posts: 75
    I have the owner manual for my 1990 honda accord and says transmission fluid----- DEXTRON only! thnaks god I knew this forum! so i followed your advice.

    on the oil change issue, I wonder if the mileage(133k miles) changes the type of oil to be used. any help on this? Should I use 5-30W or a higher grade 20-50W
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    The reason older Accord manuals say to use Dextron ATF is because Honda had not developed their own ATF Z-1 at that time. The new Honda fluid is better than Dextron. I would use the Honda fluid.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    on the oil change issue, I wonder if the mileage(133k miles) changes the type of oil to be used. any help on this? Should I use 5-30W or a higher grade 20-50W

    The grade of oil represents viscosity, kind of how the oil thickness (water has low viscosity, maple syrup has high viscosity).
    In the old days, the rings around the pistons and the seals around the valves would wear out and the car would burn oil (and the main bearings would wear, also). To minimize the effect of all this wear, thicker oils were used to cushion bearings and minimize oil burning from bad valve seals and rings.
    This shouldn't be the case with a maintained motor made in the last 20 years. The same way your blood pressure can go up with high cholesterol, thicker oil raises your oil pressure which can blow seals, etc. It also increases friction in the motor and can reduce fuel economy.

    Sorry for the long winded-ness but I would keep using what the manufacturer recommends, 5w30. Some of the "high mileage" oils have a slightly different detergent package and supposedly condition older seals and what not, but I am not sure. The Accord has had Castrol GTX 5w30 every ~5k or so for the last 150k (okay, 143k) and there have been no oil burning issues.
  • cstout73cstout73 Posts: 9
    I too have a 1993 Honda Accord that I think the Master Cyliner is going. I have replaced the pads and they are good but the brake pedal is soft. I dont think its the power assist (I followed the Haynes Book to check). I am considering buying a OEM master cylinder and replace it myself but I don't know how to bleed the brakes or change the brake fluid with ABS brakes. 1992RustBucket - Did you do it yourself? How did it go? Can anyone give me some tips?
    My experience: I haven't bleed brakes before. I have changed pads several times. I replace the radiator myself.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Here is a link that may be helpful. There should be instructions on how to bench-bleed the MC with the MC when you buy one. Good luck.
    http://syclone.motocrew.com/CG5/brakebleed.htm
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    The master cylinder usually goes out shortly after a pad change. If the fluid has not been changed often the moisture in the fluid will cause the MC shaft to rust. When bleeding the brakes, when the pedal goes to the floor, it pushes the rusted and mostly unused portion of the shaft through the seals, tearing them up. This is why I recommend using a vacume pump to bleed the brakes, instead of the old fashioned way of pumping the brake pedal.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    The master cylinder usually goes out shortly after a pad change. If the fluid has not been changed often the moisture in the fluid will cause the MC shaft to rust. When bleeding the brakes, when the pedal goes to the floor, it pushes the rusted and mostly unused portion of the shaft through the seals, tearing them up. This is why I recommend using a vacume pump to bleed the brakes, instead of the old fashioned way of pumping the brake pedal.

    Unless you are some totally anal freak who actually changes the brake fluid every 2 years or so :blush:
  • cstout73cstout73 Posts: 9
    Here is my plan - I am going to purchase a new Master Cylinder (I am assuming this is the reason for the soft brakes - 140k miles on the car & I have never changed brake fluid), get some new blake fluid, and install the master cylinder and replace brake fluid WITHOUT using the recommended ABS Checker/Scanner.
    Anyone see any issues with that??? Whats the worst that could happen? I am assume too that the booster is good.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    I think you should just bleed the brakes. I've always done my own vehicle repair, and we have easily over a million miles on our vehicles over the years.....and I've NEVER had a master cylinder go bad.

    Had to replace and/or rebuild a number of brake cylinders, replaced a number of calipers. Master cylinders? Never even on our very old very high mileage vehicles.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    I have replaced the MC, as has Elroy.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Honda maintenance schedule says to change the brake fluid every 3 years (no matter what the miles are). I plan to do it every 3 years, so maybe I will not have to change the MC on this car. The service manual for my 03 Accord says to bleed the brake lines only (not the abs). It does say to activate the abs (make the abs system activate), then bleed the brakes again. My fluid was not that bad (first 3 years of the car's life), so I decided that was not necessary this time. When the MC went out on my old car, the fluid was very dirty.
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    But if he has never bled the brakes, to change the fluid and get any air out of the lines....why would one jump to recommend a MC replacement? That would be the last thing on the list.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Yes, if he hasn't tried bleeding the brakes, he should try that first. Even if the MC does turn out to be bad, the lines will already have clean fluid in them.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Put me on that list, after about 160k miles on the car. (1996 Accord LX)
  • aoroaoro Posts: 1
    I have the same problem on my 1991 honda accord ,what was the fix on yours if you don't mind sharing thanks.
  • 2spic4u2spic4u Posts: 1
    I have a 1990 Honda Accord, after I park the car within 10-15 minutes the cooling fan goes on while the car is off... Its on for about an hour to two hours and makes a clicking sound near the relay... its stops momentarily..makes clicking sounds...then starts up again... & it doesnt stop until it drains my battery.. I changed the relay twice and realized that this isnt the problem...
    Anyone know what may be the problem?

    Any help would great!
  • FukuyamaFukuyama Posts: 75
    speaking a about brakes...I have never touched the brake fluid system in 6 years in my 1990 accord. though, I replaced the brakes pads/rotors or disk(where the pads press onto), a year ago... when you say bleeding the brake system is the same as changing the brake fluid?

    Another questions for the gang here...the manuals says I should put tires P185 70R14 87S with 29 psi front and rear...The new tires I put are P195 65R15 89T.....should I use the same pressure the manual says? or it varies depending on the tires? :confuse: :confuse:

    cheers :confuse: :confuse:
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    It's probably the fan timer, but you should read this link first, to make sure. Good luck

    http://techauto.bravehost.com/

    Click on "overheating" and scroll down.
  • lilengineerboylilengineerboy Posts: 4,116
    I have the same problem on my 1991 honda accord ,what was the fix on yours if you don't mind sharing thanks.

    That was the M/C going out. Within a couple of days, it didn't matter if the AC was on or off, and it would always pull very hard to one side when it was close to stopped.
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