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Buying American Cars What Does It Mean?

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Comments

  • is it Amazon.com? They sure have some hard ta beat deals over the internet.

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • berriberri Posts: 4,270
    If the economy here continues to erode you'll be out of a job anyway. As Asia grows and we decline, it's cheaper to service the Internet out of that region of the world. So you're job may then move to Chindia. In fact, it's already happening to techies in this country and some major US firms are transferring more of their US operations over there.
  • but Amazon.com is Seattle-based and not likely that Jeff ______ will outsource their entire Amazon.com operation out of the U.S.

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • berriberri Posts: 4,270
    Amazon, you're probably right. But I think he is more involved in automotive support and/or wholesaling? Ever have to talk to United Airlines customer or frequent flyer support. Odds are your call is going to somewhere like India or the Philippines. Same goes for quite a few large US companies.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited January 2013
    Buying American products and services does effect you. Many ask me how do I buy something I want that is not made in America. Simple, buy slightly used.


    Not being critical, but that's an over-simplification of the issue. We live in an electronic age, and there are numerous products not made anywhere in the USA anymore. Many required a high-polluting manufacturing process, which drove manufacturing off shore. In addition, you can find domestic clothing made here, but at nowhere the price clothing sels for at Walmart. Many simply can't afford to buy more expensive clothing AND put food on the table.

    Another thing is you can still find many products made in America. The chain stores buy cheap goods made from overseas to maintain healthy profits.

    Quite true, but many people don't need a professional grade of a product, and the cheap product will do. I use the example of owning an inexpensive air ratchet I paid $35-40 for, knowing its not industrial quality (since I only use it 2-3 times a year to rotate tires, anything more is senseless for me to own and would cost far more if it was made here).

    If you don't mind waiting a few days, you can find plenty of sites online for made in America goods and services.

    That's often true. However, we have been conditioned by the very domestic companies that have had a monopoly on the American market to accept planned obsolescence in the items we buy, and one often has a different outlook on buying a product that he only expects to have for a specific time before replacing it with a later and greater product. That factor along creates a huge force driving down prices.

    The really good mechanics I've known over the years most certainly understand quality, and they spend the $$$ to get the high quality tools they expect to keep for life.

    OTOH, I would guess a large percentage of TV buyers don't expect to have their current TV for life, unless they're in a retirement home.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,168
    Our biggest deficit after oil is consumer electronics. We have not been competitive in that arena since Sony first started selling US TVs in the 1960s. The Apple iPhone alone accounted for over $50 BILLION of our trade deficit last year. I have serious doubts we will ever become manufacturers of consumer electronics that anyone wants. For us it feels good to buy made in USA toys. Truth is, they are usually not what kids that are allowed to watch TV really want for Christmas. Refusing to buy any food not grown in USA would help.
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    edited January 2013
    If the economy here continues to erode you'll be out of a job anyway. As Asia grows and we decline, it's cheaper to service the Internet out of that region of the world. So you're job may then move to Chindia. In fact, it's already happening to techies in this country and some major US firms are transferring more of their US operations over there.

    Certainly that has been the trend, but I've recently read several articles about domestic companies moving some operations back to the US after they realized the business model didn't adequately compensate for all factors, such as language differences, currency differentials, etc.

    I'll see if I can find a couple of examples.

    Edit: Here is one...

    http://finance.fortune.cnn.com/2011/06/29/return-of-american-manufacturing/
  • that would be interesting to see...companies that decided to outsource that for one practical, business-based reason or another, decided that they needed to do business back in the U.S.

    2011 Kia Soul Sport 5-speed

  • berriberri Posts: 4,270
    I've seen that, but sometimes the move is to Latin America or Mexico from Asia. However, product production is moving back in some cases, but I think less so for customer service type stuff like at United, or for bulk items that never really undergo significant changes. As for automotive, probably depends on which market your stuff supports. More and more vehicles are selling overseas these days.
  • bpizzutibpizzuti Posts: 2,743
    I work for an auto parts eCommerce provider and automotive parts catalog company.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,535
    Back to burgers...

    Someone mentioned 'Red Robin'. I had forgotten about them. I've always had excellent burgers there, but haven't been in one in two or three years. They have one burger that's covered with garlic-butter-drenched mushrooms. Oooh yeah!

    I think they're a Canadian company, but my stomach doesn't mind. I last ate at one at Hershey. We drove a golf cart from motorhome parking over there. What a scene--we were on whatever that busy street that intersects with the Hershey 'loop' is, praying that nobody would rear-end us!
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I like those but my wife loves loves them!

    They have great fries and the seasoning at the table goes great with the fries.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,143
    And if it is Amazon.com, he has my heartfelt thanks. I have a few shares of them, and it's returned about 40% over roughly the past year and a half.

    I had sold my GM stock to buy it, so I lucked out there, as GM took a dive soon after I sold it.

    I guess Amazon.com does put the pressure on a lot of brick-and-mortar retailers. But, it helps keep the postal service in business, I guess!
  • busirisbusiris Posts: 3,490
    Hmmm... Does one get rear-ended in a golf cart, or simply run over???

    There is a Red Robin here near a large shopping mall. I've eaten there once, and would do so again if the traffic wasn't so congested. There are too many other great places to eat around here that are far easier to get in and out of... Seems a lot of these "specialty-type" burger joints like to locate in heavily traffic-infested areas...
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 29,168
    E-Commerce is also environmentally better for the country. Saves gas driving to the mall to shop.
  • cannon3cannon3 Posts: 296
    edited January 2013
    If you feel you are safe in your job because of e-commerce you are one of those who are thinking short term. If people don't have jobs here at home, they cannot shop e-commerce anyway and you will be out of a job. Americans must start thinking longterm in the way we purchase goods and services. We must break out of being owned by China and other forgein countries. Americans must be educated on how important it is to invest in America first for your own future and our childrens future along with the future economic stability of America. We are programmed to think short term in means of instant self gratification when buying items. When you buy American goods more people at home benefit from your purchase.
    I was in a conversation in another chat room with a person who feels much the same way I do. The rich in this country must also play their part in keeping America financially stable and viable. They must understand that a little less profit in the short run will bring gains in the long run. Making it here in the U.S. may cost a bit more, profits may not be as large, but you will still make profit. Keeping America economically stable is beneficial for all Americans, rich or poor or middle class.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,037
    edited January 2013
    E-Commerce is also environmentally better for the country. Saves gas driving to the mall to shop.

    So the UPS trucks are powered by non polluting unicorn farts??
  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 17,939
    What you say makes sense but I'm afraid you are "whistling in the dark".

    It's too late at this point. We are a much weaker nation and we have let this happen to us.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,143
    Everything I've ever bought from Amazon.com has come by way of the post office. So, in this case at least, it's probably pretty eco-friendly, since the mailman goes down my street every day, 6 days a week, anyway.

    Oddly though, I had to return a pair of jeans that were defective (one pocket sewn too short), and the instructions were to send them back via UPS. But, the replacement jeans came thanks to the mailman.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,037
    So I'll counter with:

    do the 40+ Amazon distribution centers and who knows how many server farms have giant hamster wheels out back???

    My point was that saying shopping online is green is a bit of a stretch.

    Now I'm not saying that I don't shop online. My bigger issue is with people that showroom at brick and mortar stores then shopping online.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,775
    So the UPS trucks are powered by non polluting unicorn farts??

    I'm sure one truck delivering to a neighborhood is better than every house driving to the local mall and back.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,775
    It's too late at this point. We are a much weaker nation and we have let this happen to us.

    And the restrictive union work rules and exorbitant benefits have cause a large part of that to occur.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,205
    Amen, cannon3, amen!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,313
    And an even larger part caused by execs and upper managers with no accountability and no long term visions. Time to redefine the idea of financial crimes, make them count as treason and eligible for capital punishment.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,205
    Once again you're the voice of wisdom, cannon!
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,313
    edited January 2013
    Is it really any different than say shopping for a car at a high overhead dealer and then buying the same car for less at a lower overhead location? That seems to happen a lot.

    Shopping online is probably "greener" than every single person taking a trip in a car to buy every single item. I don't save a fortune most of the time when I shop via the computer, but I don't have to deal with going to the store.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 8,037
    Is it really any different than say shopping for a car at a high overhead dealer and then buying the same car for less at a lower overhead location?

    IMHO it is. All car dealers have a similar overhead percentage wise. Not so with brick and mortar stores vis a vis online retailers.

    The way I look at it is one has the time to go showroom at a brick and mortar store and take up time from a salesperson, why not give them a shot at the sale.

    In my industry, there is a lot of design and product knowledge involved so it's not like buying a $100 printer. But so many consumers think it's ok to get the showroom person to spend half a day with them designing a kitchen or bath and then go and shop each item on the internet.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,143
    But so many consumers think it's ok to get the showroom person to spend half a day with them designing a kitchen or bath and then go and shop each item on the internet.

    Yeah that, I have a problem with. When I buy something online, it's something that I don't really need to test out first. For instance, I don't need a salesman to explain to me how to work "Smokey and the Bandit" on blu-ray. And I know what size I take in Under Armour, what waist/length Levis I wear, what size Adidas I wear, etc.
  • fintailfintail Posts: 34,313
    edited January 2013
    Do all car dealers really have the same overhead? In my area, taxes and operating expenses (especially value of land) vary by county. It is generally known if you travel a county or two over, you can save money. People do it.

    I guess I can deal with the "give them a shot" if they are working under quotas or commissions. But if I am going to buy crap from a chain store in my backyard or a couple hours away, or from the internet, it doesn't matter so much, esp if the stuff is from China anyway. Most people don't shop around, so one sale doesn't matter.

    I also will buy car parts online, rather than from the dealer - huge overhead there that I don't deal with, and maybe shouldn't have to.
  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,775
    And an even larger part caused by execs and upper managers with no accountability and no long term visions. Time to redefine the idea of financial crimes, make them count as treason and eligible for capital punishment.

    I see it as a partnership in crime. The unions were greedy and wanted more. The execs took the short term easy solution by granting the union wishes at the expense of the health of the long term business. The unions held a gun to the heads of GM in the 90's, for example. And of course the execs are responsible for the decisions leading to the lousy vehicles over all those years. So nobody's hands were clean.

    I don't disagree about criminal exec behavior, but I'd stop at capital punishment for that.
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