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Buying American Cars What Does It Mean?

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  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    @fintail said:
    Good observation on the bustleback styling differences. Chrysler probably pulled it off best. I always thought the Imperial looks like a big fancy R-body coupe, which isn't being said as a bad thing, especially if one likes angular cars. The Lincoln is kind of dowdy, and the Seville is ostentatious.

    Scary thing is, the '81-83 Imperial is really just a big, fancy Volare coupe! But, I guess that's not really a bad thing, considering a Mark VII was just a big fancy Fairmont, and from '75-79 at least, the Seville was just a big fancy Nova!

    I think the '81-83 Imperial (as well as '80-83 Cordoba/Mirada) did use a variation of the R-body dashboard. Or, at least they took some pieces from it.

    I'll admit though, I'm starting to like those '82-87 era Continental sedans more and more. It's hard to hide the fact that they're based on the fox body, but they're at least handsome, in a conservative way.

  • fezofezo Manahawkin, NJPosts: 10,149

    Back on an earlier comment from Andre I would agree that Mopars survived the 57 into 58 difficulties pretty well. I liked the full light fins on the 67 Plymouth better but that's probably due to the fact that it made ours look slightly dated which, of course, was the idea.

    My aunt had a 59 or 60 Plymouth wagon. I'll have to look up and see which it was. I just remember it struck me as hideous but from the inside it was great!

    2013 Mazda 5 Grand Touring, 2010 Toyota Prius IV. 2007 Toyota Camry XLE, 2004 Toyota Camry LE, 1999 Mazda Miata
  • carnaughtcarnaught Desert SWPosts: 1,769

    Like those old "newer" Imperials. There must not be many of them around but they'll still probably never become collector's cars.

    2015 Lexus RC350 F-Sport, 2015 Honda Accord Hybrid Touring, 2013 Audi A4 Premium Plus (son's got it)
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    @fezo said:
    Back on an earlier comment from Andre I would agree that Mopars survived the 57 into 58 difficulties pretty well. I liked the full light fins on the 67 Plymouth better but that's probably due to the fact that it made ours look slightly dated which, of course, was the idea.

    I've also wondered if the taillight change for '58 was a cost cutting move on the Plymouth? Not only did they go from those full-height taillights to the little "lollipop" lights, but they also went from two backup lights to just one! It was mounted low on the bumper, under the license plate.

    My aunt had a 59 or 60 Plymouth wagon. I'll have to look up and see which it was. I just remember it struck me as hideous but from the inside it was great!

    My guess would be a '60? IMO at least, it was the more hideous of the two. The '59 was a bit garish, with an eggcrate grille and frenched headlights. But the '60 had a really overdone, hulking front-end, and had oddly-shaped wheel openings, and was just hideous in general. Although I think the fins were kinda cool...a bit Cadillac-ish.

  • fintailfintail Posts: 35,478

    When I was a kid, I had an aunt and uncle who had a bustleback Continental, and it shared a garage with a Fox body Mustang with T-tops (probably no newer than 83 or so). Two Foxes in one garage. At the time, I was much more impressed with the Mustang. She's the one who won an electric "Citicar" in a mall contest, I remember I got a ride in it before it was sold - there's an American car seldom seen.

    I didn't know the Imperial was a Volare. It carries the R body theme well.

    @andre1969 said:
    I'll admit though, I'm starting to like those '82-87 era Continental sedans more and more. It's hard to hide the fact that they're based on the fox body, but they're at least handsome, in a conservative way.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    @carnaught said:
    Like those old "newer" Imperials. There must not be many of them around but they'll still probably never become collector's cars.

    >
    Well, Chrysler tried to give the car snob appeal by saying they were going to limit first year, 1981 production to "just" 25,000 units. Needless to say, they didn't have to bother, as only something like 7225 were sold that first year. And from there it went downhill fast.

    I still see them on occasion, but I also attend a lot of old car shows throughout the year, and hang with a lot of Chrysler people. So my experiences probably aren't the best gauge of what's still common and what isn't. For instance, I probably see more '57 Plymouths in a given year, than '57 Chevies. Mainly because there's always a ton of them at the Mopar show in Carlisle PA, but the the GM show has a much smaller turnout, in general. There's a show I go to in Macungie PA, that usually has a pretty good turnout of '55-57 Chevies...enough that they have their own class.

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 47,542

    Here's an Imperial FS for sale:

    http://rustybuttrusty.com/2014/02/11/too-soon-for-irony-1981-imperial-frank-sinatra-edition/

    What a bizarre marketing angle. And look at that asking price -- $2650 !! You'd be rich if had held onto yours! :)

    Well I guess they still do occasionally name American cars after people---there was the Eddie Bauer edition Ford Explorer, right? And the "Enzo". Will there be a Putin edition Lada?

    One problem with trying this in 2014 is that so many celebrities self-destruct that putting a famous name on a car could be very risky.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    Well, I think whatever fascination I once had with Nissan is pretty much over with. If y'all remember, they told my buddy with the 2006 Xterra that it will probably be needing a new timing chain soon. Well, they also said it could be needing new front wheel bearings, or hubs, or something like that soon as well.

    Now, to top it all off, the oil gauge is acting funny. When you first turn it on, it spikes all the way to the top of the range, and reads high the whole time it's on. However, I noticed that it reads high even when the key is turned to "on", but with the engine off...a time when you would have no oil pressure. So that suggests to me that it's something wrong with either the gauge, sending unit, or wiring or something, but the real oil pressure is most likely okay.

    Yesterday, I had him pop the hood just on the off chance that I could find the sending unit, and I noticed that the paint on the inner fenders in the engine bay is starting to peel off.

    I guess in its defense, the thing is 8 years old now. And nothing stays new forever. So maybe I am judging Nissan a bit harshly. Although some of y'all did warn me that their quality did start slipping around this timeframe.

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 7,687
    edited May 2014

    Our 1993 Pathfinder was 10 years old when we sold it and it was chugging along fine. My knock on Nissan today is that-aside from the 370Z and Godzilla-everything they make is a snoozemobile of the highest degree...

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5i

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    I'll confess that I have a fondness for the Maxima, although I haven't driven one yet. I can't remember if I've ever even sat in one.

    Way back in 1993, I had just graduated college, got what I thought was a good paying job, and suddenly got on an SUV kick. I remember test driving a bunch of them, and I liked that era Pathfinder a lot. I think the one I looked at was around $26,000 or so, and one issue I had with them was that the Pathfinder didn't offer a sliding sunroof. I think it had some kind of internal rollbar, or something that made it impossible to have one. Out of the compact SUVs I drove, I think I liked the Pathfinder the best overall at the time.

    Ultimately though, that was a passing phase, once I realized that buying something like that would delay me moving out on my own.

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 7,687

    What I really liked about the Pathfinder was that it had true off road capability but still drove like a car. Even back in 1993 it was available with four wheel disc brakes and cockpit adjustable shocks.

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5i

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,276

    I remember getting a Pathfinder as a loaner vehicle when my 1989 Mercury Grand Marquis was being serviced. It was kind of neat to drive for a day or two, but I couldn't see driving it every day in the city.

  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,214

    http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140527/BIZ/305270020/0/auto01/Minivan-family-hauler-poised-rebound-U-S-

    Two brands that are perfect for this segment? Volvo and Subaru. Both of them have a history of top safety score and family oriented transportation. Heck, for Subaru I would put a minivan at the forefront of new products well before a new Tribeca.

    Nobody but Toyota (Chrysler doesn't anymore, do they?) offers a AWD minivan so the door is wide open there and a premium minivan from Volvo might give them a leg up on the Germans who other than the odd duck Mercedes R-Classe have note fielded in this segment here in the states...

  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 44,875

    Along those lines, "We know what we are and what we aren't," said Minyang Jiang, Ford's brand manager for the Transit Connect. "We're not a $40,000 people mover."

    She was referring to the cost of traditional minivans, which increasingly are difficult to keep under the $40,000 pricing threshold. Indeed, there are versions of the Toyota Sienna and Honda Odyssey that push the big Five-Oh when loaded up with things like adaptive cruise control, rear-seat entertainment systems and even a vacuum cleaner. You can't get such luxuries on the Transit Connect, but there's still an ample amount of equipment available at a price that significantly undercuts the big boys."

    2014 Ford Transit Connect First Drive

    Moderator - Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    I don't think the Grand Caravan or Town and Country have offered AWD for awhile, now. Looks like 1992-2004, according to Wikipedia. I had forgotten that they started that early on.

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    Well, it looks like my Ram gets to have its first repair visit to the dealer. It got stuck in 4th gear again yesterday, for the 3rd time since I've had it, and this time it made the check engine light come on. I got the dash to display this:

    I looked it up online, and found this info...
    0876 UD PRESSURE SWITCH RATIONALITY
    When Monitored
    Continuously with the ignition on and engine running.

    Set Condition
    This DTC is set if the UD pressure switch is in the wrong state for the current gear. For example, this code would be set if the UD pressure switch remained off while the transmission was in second gear.

    Possible Causes
    RELATED TCM POWER INPUT DTCS PRESENT
    LOW FLUID LEVEL
    NO. 2 CHECK BALL CUT OR DAMAGED
    LOW LINE PRESSURE
    CRACKED OR MIS-INSTALLED SUMP FILTER OR SEAL
    STICKING MAIN REGULATOR VALVE IN PUMP VALVE BODY
    (T29) UD PRESSURE SWITCH SENSE CIRCUIT OPEN
    (T29) UD PRESSURE SWITCH CIRCUIT SHORT TO GROUND
    (T29) UD PRESSURE SWITCH SENSE CIRCUIT SHORT TO ANOTHER CIRCUITS
    TRANSMISSION SOLENOID/TRS ASSEMBLY
    POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE.

    Hopefully, it's nothing too serious. And I hope the warranty covers it, otherwise I'm dOnE!

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 18,449

    So, you have an irrational pressure switch?

  • slorenzenslorenzen Posts: 497

    @isellhondas said:
    So, you have an irrational pressure switch?

    I get that a lot...

    :D

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    Wonder who I should blame it on? The Mexicans, the Italians, or the Americans? There wouldn't be any German left in the Ram by 2012, would there?

  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,922

    @isellhondas said:
    So, you have an irrational pressure switch?

    I think it means that with another Chrysler problem, his head is developing irrational pressure. :o

  • isellhondasisellhondas Issaquah WashingtonPosts: 18,449

    @andre1969 said:
    Wonder who I should blame it on? The Mexicans, the Italians, or the Americans? There wouldn't be any German left in the Ram by 2012, would there?

    Oh, just blame it on George Bush!

  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 22,601

    @isellhondas said:
    Oh, just blame it on George Bush!

    Or to quote Jackie Gleason, from "Smokey and the Bandit"... "Goddang Germans got not'in t'do wit' it!!" Don't ask me why that popped into my head.

    Oh, saw something a little off-the-wall the other day, that caught my attention. A crash between an '03-07 generation of Corolla, and a Ford Escort ZX-2 coupe. The Escort had made a left turn and got hit by the Corolla. Corolla looked almost like the result of one of those NHTSA offset crash tests. The Escort? It had a big dent in the door, and the quarter panel just aft of it.

    Guess those old Escorts were tougher than I'd normally give them credit for. But, by that time, wasn't Mazda more responsible for them than Ford?

  • anythngbutgmanythngbutgm Posts: 4,214

    http://www.autoblog.com/2014/07/18/bmw-biggest-us-auto-industry-exporter/

    "According to a recent profile by Bloomberg looking at the plant's 20th anniversary, Bimmer's southern ops sends out more vehicles than all of Michigan combined."

  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 7,687

    Three cheers for the Blau und Weiss!!!

    Mine: 1995 318ti Club Sport 2007 Mazdaspeed 3 1999 Wrangler 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica Wife's: 2009 328i Son's: 2004 X3 2.5i

  • Mr_ShiftrightMr_Shiftright CaliforniaPosts: 47,542

    Often imitated but never duplicated! BMW taught the average American sedan buyer what "handling" meant.

    MODERATOR --Need help with anything? Click on my name!

  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,780

    I saw an article the other day stating that the car brands with the worst loyalty and repeat buyers included Chrysler and Dodge. Well duh, who wants lemons two times in a row?

  • tlongtlong CaliforniaPosts: 4,922
    I'd say that at this point the issue is amount of US content, minus the Canadian content that is included in the "domestic" number (with no offense to Canada). Nameplate really doesn't matter at all. How much does the construction, assembly, and sales of a vehicle add to the US economy? That is important for those who want it to benefit the U.S.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 8,117
    I think assembly most definitely adds to the U.S. economy, although I might be misunderstanding your written word. The Lordstown GM assembly plant near me employs thousands of people, not to mention suppliers near the area. I'd still rather the management of the company be U.S.-based. I can't forget the deer-in-the-headlights look of Toyota's N.A. head when asked questions about their recalls. He deferred most everything to Mr. Toyoda. That's just a personal opinion of mine, nothing more.
  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 8,117
    BTW, in response to the comment about Michigan above....most of the Big Three's assembly plants are outside of Michigan, in my memory, anyway.
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