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Buying American Cars What Does It Mean?

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Comments

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    The battery for the 1956 Lincoln was under the front passenger floorboard. A lot of really old cars had the battery under a panel near the running board.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    I miss the days when all you needed to change a headlight or a bulb was a phillips-head screwdriver.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,593
    I miss the days when all you needed to change a headlight or a bulb was a phillips-head screwdriver.

    Sometimes they're still not *too* hard to get to. I remember replacing a headlight bulb on my 2000 Intrepid, and it was fairly simple. Just take out two really long bolts, and the whole assembly would pull forward, and all the bulbs in it would just twist out. The taillights were pretty easy to get to as well, although I think I did have to pull a piece of trunk trim loose to get access. The only light I remember being a real pain was the license plate light. It was a tight squeeze, and you had to almost be ambidextrous to reach it.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 38,978
    My van's headlights are just held in place by a big plastic nut. You can change a bulb with your bare hands and access is easy.
  • robr2robr2 BostonPosts: 7,601
    edited March 2013
    There are some rough Philly neighborhoods going through this trend right now: Northern Liberties and Point Breeze are two.

    This happens in cities all over the country - it's part of the cycle of boom, bust, regrowth.

    Here in Boston, the neighborhoods of Charlestown, the North End and the South End have had this renaissance in the past 15 years or so. Now South Boston is the new hot area and Roxbury and East Boston are both seeing some interest.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    When I was a kid the poor black folks lived in the section of San Diego called Logan Heights. When I returned from in the 1990s the name and demographic had changed to Latino and called Barrio Logan. During the housing bubble most of it was bought up by investors and the poor Latinos are being forced out. It is becoming an upscale neighborhood. Prime location in San Diego near the new Padre Baseball Stadium.
  • tifightertifighter WAPosts: 1,350
    My mother grew up in Logan Heights in the 50's. Wasn't exactly a posh neighborhood, by her account.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    People were moving to the suburbs from downtown San Diego by the early 1950s. We lived in El Cajon & Spring Valley. Then moved out to Lakeside. Much of it due to massive growth and cheaper land East. When I went to work for the phone company in 1961 the warehouse was down on Commercial St in the heart of Logan Heights. It was a mixture of shops, warehouses and older homes. Buck knives was in the alley behind us. Now there is a great old name of Made in the USA product. They moved several times out to East County. Their last move was to Idaho to get away from repressive taxes in CA. Will "Made in America" survive?
  • tifightertifighter WAPosts: 1,350
    Funny, my grandmother was friends with the Buck family. I was given a Buck Kalinga for my first birthday, with my name and birthday engraved on it and a nice presentation case. Came in handy for eating those jars of whirled peas, I tell you...
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    I bought a big Buck hunting knife from them. Used to spend my lunch time watching the boys handmake their great knives. Also had the best Mexican food out of a converted garage around the corner. The best Tostado you can imagine for 21 cents. That was about 1962. Funny the things you remember. Were you raised in San Diego? If we could split the state at the Orange County Los Angeles county line So CA would be a great state to live in. We are totally corrupted by the Northern Californians.
  • tifightertifighter WAPosts: 1,350
    No, I am from the Seattle area. But I'm currently living in Oakland, making me a corrupt northern Californian. We'll actually be leaving California completely in the summer. Its been pretty nice here, really, but this was always a four year deal, and that time is coming up soon.
  • dave8697dave8697 Posts: 1,485
    probably the last shoveling of the year with 52 degrees expected for saturday. My heating bills (nat gas) topped out at $145 this winter compared to twice that in recent years. No wonder the administration hates fracking. It doesn't allow enough suffering.
  • gagricegagrice San DiegoPosts: 28,680
    Lucky you, I am in San Diego and have averaged $400 per month this winter for Propane. To keep the house at a frigid 68 degrees. I could cut that in half or less with Natural Gas. It is very limited in the smaller suburbs. It is still in the 40s with daytime high in the low 50s. No jobs, No warm weather. Does not leave much enticement to live in CA.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Search YouTube for "flammable tap water" and be prepared to laugh.
  • berriberri Posts: 4,006
    It's just been an odd winter weather in many parts of the country this year. Personally, I expect the California economy to rebound down the road. The area attracts young talent and the PAC 10 universities are still excellent schools. Industry will eventually have to put the hammer down on these idiots in Congress and then I think we're in for better times presuming the federal Reserve doesn't step on it like they have too often over the past several decades. Don't let that cloudy northwest and midwest type weather bring you down - it's just an anomaly in southern CA!
  • andres3andres3 CAPosts: 5,284
    What about overloading a '95 Neon sedan? I never dared look at the weight ratings stamped on the door sides, but I'm sure there were a few trips between college and home where I had overloaded that sucker.

    I'm sure that's the reason it was a :lemon: :P . Never towed anything with it though.
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    I saw the James Bond classic "Goldfinger" the other day. One part of the movie shows a Lincoln Continental being put in a crusher with a dead mobster and a pallet of gold bars inside. The crushed cube is then loaded in the bed of a 1964 Ford Falcon Ranchero. I doubt a Falcon Ranchero could've carried the weight of a crushed 1962 Continental. What say ye?
  • dieselonedieselone Posts: 5,627
    edited March 2013
    You're not suppose to notice that. I doubt the lincoln could handle a pallet of gold bars;)
  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    Forgot about that. That Lincoln should've been dragging its tail. So, we've got the weight of a 5,000 lb Lincoln, about 150 - 200 lbs for a dead mobster, (Mr. Solo didn't appear to be a heavy guy) and an unknown amount of weight for the gold bars and a solid oak pallet in the bed of a Falcon Ranchero. Not only that, but the Ranchero is driven by sumo-wrestler sized Oddjob. That Ranchero should've collapsed on its axles.
  • andre1969andre1969 Posts: 21,593
    edited March 2013
    It's been so long since I've seen Goldfinger that I've pretty much forgotten about it, other than the little toy plane where you could see the strings holding it up and the line "I'm sure it is, dear, but you still haven't told me your name!" :P

    Just found this pic, though:
    image

    Somehow, I have trouble believing that a 1964 Continental could even be crushed down into such a tiny cube.
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