Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Honda CR-V, Toyota RAV4 or Subaru Forester?

2456726

Comments

  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "There were some positives in the new Rav4, being the sliding back seats, heated front lower portion of the wind shield where the wipers sit with a push of a button and floor storage compartments in the back. "

    CR-V has sliding (and reclining) rear seats and under floor storage in the cargo area. Can't match that windshield wiper heater, though the defrosters work well...
  • trout2trout2 Posts: 13
    We just bought a new "SUV" - the Honda Element. We looked at 4 vehicles very seriously: '06 Toyota RAV4, '06 Honda CRV, '06 Saturn VUE and the '06 Honda Element. Obviously, the Element is a tad different than the other 3. I preferred a "traditional" car-based SUV, she really liked the Element. She won.

    I am, and continue to be, impressed with the CRV though. It was my choice, even in the face of the very nice '06 RAV4. The RAV4 is a great car, but for being a 5 year old model, the 2nd generation CRV still holds its own. I can only imagine how good the redesign (3rd generation) will be. The Saturn VUE was also nice, especially with that Honda V6 engine. We dont need that much power, but with that engine, the Saturn made its way into our Final 4.

    You can tell a difference with that extra 10 hp's the RAV4 currently has over the CRV (166 vs 156). However, the SAFETY features of the CRV really stood out to me. It was like a Volvo, in my mind, with just about every safety feature standard, whereas side airbags are an option on the RAV4 and the VUE. The RAV4, IMO, drove more "carlike" than the CRV - it was like driving an elevated Camry. Very smooth.

    Pound for pound, and feature for feature, I still feel the CRV is a better "value" than the new RAV4.

    I also like the fact that Honda still manages a manual transmission option. The RAV4 does not. If we had bought the CRV, we would have gotten the 5 speed manual.

    I do wish Honda would allow a bit more flexibility with the exterior/interior color combinations. If I want black exterior, I like to be able to get tan interior, and not be forced into an interior color based on exterior color.

    We bought the Honda Element because that's the car my wife really wanted. However, if anyone is looking for a compact/mid sized SUV, you couldnt go wrong with the CRV or RAV4, with the CRV having the best "value" ratio, in my opinion.
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    The most significant source of noise in the CR-V is going to be road noise. A) the stock tires are pretty bad, and B) to keep weight down, the vehicle does not have a great deal of sound insulation. On the plus side, engine noise is very well muted and wind noise is so-so.
  • kumarikumari Posts: 72
    That might work fine with a small, thin, item; but, I was schlepping home a huge wooden armoire and my rear hatch closed over the top, but there was about a foot opening that I had to tie down. There were no loose items to "roll around" in the cargo area. I couldn't have done that without that top-closing hatch. The armoire only needed to be driven around 6 miles on city streets to my house, so the tie down was sufficient. BTW, I currently have a roof rack which I've only used once in 11 years to move large sheets of drywall that just wouldn't fit inside my regular SUV.

    You are SO funny! Of course, the window is a bonus - which the RAV-4 doesn't even have. But, I'm still going for the Forester XT. The CRV was more "truck-like" and I've been driving a truck-based SUV for 11 years and I really want a sports car - none of the other small SUVs drove like the Forester - maybe it was the lower center of gravity?
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "The CRV was more "truck-like" and I've been driving a truck-based SUV for 11 years and I really want a sports car - none of the other small SUVs drove like the Forester - maybe it was the lower center of gravity?"

    Oh, if performance is your main criteria, the Subie is the way to go, no question.

    Enjoy your new wheels! (When you get them)
  • manamalmanamal Posts: 434
    I went for the Subie last year because....well...first, the local honda dealers are jerks....Also, when cornering hard, I *felt* much more secure in the Forester than the CRV. Now, this wekend, I might be able to try the Subie in the snow.
  • "if performance is your main criteria, the Subie is the way to go, no question"
    "when cornering hard, I *felt* much more secure in the Forester"

    obviously steevedebi and manamal have never driven the RAV4 sport.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    "if performance is your main criteria, the Subie is the way to go, no question"
    "when cornering hard, I *felt* much more secure in the Forester"

    obviously steevedebi and manamal have never driven the RAV4 sport.


    Does RAV4 sport come with a manual shifter? If not, then it is not perfomance. No matter what engine you stick in there, if there is no clutch, it ain't no performance car, but a grocery getter.
  • thecatthecat Posts: 528
    Come on lets get real. None of these vehicles are "performance" cars. The Subie is darn quick but it's not a ralley car. You can't take these comments so literally. What is being talked about is the feeling of agility .. being fun to drive. By that criteria (which is very subjective) both of these cars qualify.
  • "maybe it was the lower center of gravity?" Could be that and the AWD together. Whatever, a Forester handles quite well even with the stock Geolandars. It is not top heavy when cornering with gusto.

    I traded in a Beemer 525i (after 118k miles) for an XS 15 months ago. I don't drive up to the limits of the handling of a car - probably up to 95% on occasion - and I'd rate the two equal in dry weather handling. In wet weather or icy weather, I always had this little voice in the back of my mind saying "don't do anything stupid" when driving the Beemer fast in the snow. I have yet to hear that voice after 24k miles and two winters in the XS.
  • thecatthecat Posts: 528
    Full time AWD does give a level of confidence once you realize the answer to most handling issues is stay on the gas. I've been driving a WRX for the last 4 years and I have on occasion driven it at 80% (I've seen what 100% is and I'm nowhere near that)The handling limits far exceed my fear factor. I rode in a WRX with a pro driver once and he almost gave me a heart attack (and I've riden with Juice at several different BMW & Mercedes events).

    I would agree the Forester is much more nimble than the CRV due to it's lower center of grav. and AWD.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    " I would agree the Forester is much more nimble than the CRV due to it's lower center of grav. and AWD."

    Welllll, I don't know about much more nimble, but more nimble, certainly. Note that I purchased the CR-V myself after driving both, so that vehicle is my preferrence.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "obviously steevedebi and manamal have never driven the RAV4 sport."

    Nope, wasn't available when I was test driving.
  • kumarikumari Posts: 72
    "obviously steevedebi and manamal have never driven the RAV4 sport."

    Nope, wasn't available when I was test driving.


    I drove the RAV4-sport and it was very nice, but still NO CONTEST when compared to the Forester - just didn't have the cornering ability. Felt like it was going to tip when I took a hard right. Other than that, though, it was a VERY nice vehicle. I didn't care for the double-decker dashboard and center console - it was just too busy for me, but some people might find it nice.

    I'm probably getting my Forester XT in March - after all of this shopping I hope I am happy with it! So far, my only issue with it are the armrest (too far back, even with the adjustment) and I feel like the steering wheel is too close to my lap (I raise the seat up cuz I like to ride high - it's a trade off). The HUGE sunroof, top opening hatch and handling ability really made the deal for me, though.

    Samantha
  • thecatthecat Posts: 528
    "Note that I purchased the CR-V myself after driving both, so that vehicle is my preferrence."

    I've said it before .. some people don't like chocolate ice cream that's why they make different flavors. You find what tickles your fancy and that's what you buy.

    BTW - if you don't like chocolate ice cream there is something wrong with you.:)
  • Have been looking at both the CRV and the RAV4. Is the RAV4's AWD the same as the CRV's RTAWD? How often do you actually use the flip open rear window in the CRV? How often do you actually move from the front seat to the rear seat in the CRV? Are arm rests now standard in CRV or are they a dealer installed option? In 97/98 they were standard but then Honda de-contented. Which do you prefer for light cargo hauling? Would appreciate a response, thanks.
  • The RAV4's 4WD system works better I think. It is the lastest generation of the electronic 4WD, so they learn from what other did wrong. The flip open window is nice if you put something back there that is long. With the RAV4, you would have to put it on the roof rack. I dont think I ever have such a need to move from the front seats to the back to jusify that cheap plastic center concole in the CRV. To be fair to yourself, you need to test drive them both. I did and I found that the RAV4 sport handled better and was queiter on the road. What really blew me away was how much better the RAV4 was put together, the material used on the RAV4 was much better too and It just have a solid feel to it which I didnt get with the CRV.
  • bshelbshel Posts: 232
    little3,
    I believe the AWD on the new Rav is a locking system, which is different from the RTAWD on the CR-V.

    I use the flip window in the V fairly often, as I can pop it up to load and unload items, without having to swing open the door. In going from front to rear, I think I hear more owners who have kids, pass through there. But the flip up tray is very nice - leave it down, put some items there, pop it up for beverages, etc. Arm rests are standard on the AT, but not on the MT (available in EX model only). This is the last yr for the 2nd generation of the cr-v - will be changes for MY2007.
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    It's great for dog owners. Allows us to get a leash on the hounds without allowing the beasts to escape as you open the door.

    I wouldn't call it essential hardware, but it's a nice convenience.
  • Thanks for your responses. I appreciate your information especially in that it is "real world" experience. One last question: why does Honda have a soft sided cover for the spare unlike the RAV4's hard cover. Does it really save that much money? Thanks again.
  • varmintvarmint Posts: 6,326
    Cost savings would be my assumption, but there's no real evidence. Honda does offer a hard cover as an accessory through the dealers (costly). It is also standard equipment on the SE trim.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    No matter what engine you stick in there, if there is no clutch, it ain't no performance car, but a grocery getter.

    So, the Mercedes E55 isn't performance oriented, with its 5-speed auto? 469 hp seems to "perform" pretty well.

    Just b/c an auto is in it, does not mean it isn't a performance car. If any of these SUVs are credited as a performance car, I will eat my hat, anyways.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "How often do you actually move from the front seat to the rear seat in the CRV? "

    When the CR-V is really packed to the gills on long vacations, I open the glass window and stuff in more loose items. Just remember to pull them back out via the window - if you open the door it will all spill out! So yes, it is useful...
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "How often do you actually use the flip open rear window in the CRV?"

    When the CR-V is really packed to the gills on long vacations, I open the glass window and stuff in more loose items. Just remember to pull them back out via the window - if you open the door it will all spill out! So yes, it is useful...
  • saabgirlsaabgirl Posts: 184
    How often do you actually use the flip open rear window in the CRV?

    Regularly. In fact, the Subaru, RAV4 and CR-V were so close in the test drive that the flip up window, ample ground clearance and easily accessible tie downs underneath were features that persuaded me the Honda would be easiest to live with. My kayak easily fits inside the CR-V with a couple feet sticking out the rear window. No need to wrestle it up on the roof at the end of a day's paddling.

    Also, I thought the CR-V had less road rumble than the RAV4, not that I'd describe either vehicle as quiet.

    But the good news for buyers is that it's hard to make a truly bad choice in this class of vehicle.
  • p0926p0926 Posts: 4,423
    Needless to say you have to be really careful with the IIHS ratings. They will rate a car good, even though it has some bad scores for things like head and pelvis protection.

    Ah! I love it when someone selectively uses statistics to prove a point. In fact, the Forester performed the best "overall" in the IIHS's tests. Yes there were a couple of specific areas where it only received an acceptable rating but compare that to the "overall" POOR rating that the CRV received for rear impact protection: http://www.iihs.org/ratings/summary.aspx?class=58

    However, if safety is truly an overriding concern, I'd go with a full-size sedan or a minivan ;)

    -Frank
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    However, if safety is truly an overriding concern, I'd go with a full-size sedan or a minivan

    Hummer H1
    Suburban
    Escalade
    Excursion
  • thecatthecat Posts: 528
    Hey, why not an M-1 Abrams tank! :)
    It will take a direct hit from a R.P.G.
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,109
    I suppose if you could afford one you could handle the fuel cost of 3 GALLONS PER MILE - to say nothing of maintenance and upkeep. Offsetting that, of course, is the advantage of not having to worry about finding a parking spot. ;)

    tidester, host
  • p0926p0926 Posts: 4,423
    Hummer H1
    Suburban
    Escalade
    Excursion


    Statistically speaking, I believe that these are not as safe as a full-size sedan or minivan :P

    I actually thought about mentionng the M1 Abrams as the ultimate safe vehicle but decided not to since they aren't readily available for civilian purchase :P Plus, there's no place to secure a child's car seat :D

    -Frank
This discussion has been closed.