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Volvo XC70 Safety Issues

j421j421 Posts: 1
edited August 17 in Volvo
I'm currently considering a new vehicle purchase, and am looking at the Volvo XC70 and XC90. My primary criteria is safety (vehicle reliability, etc., is also important). Any thoughts on the safety differences between the XC90 and the XC70? I realize the XC90 is a larger vehicle, making it 'safer.'
(I'm also considering the Honda CRV).

Thanks
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Comments

  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    A Volvo or a CRV?
    That is like choosing between a safe and a beer can.

    Both Volvo's are strong, the XC90 is built alot stronger though.
    It makes extensive use of Boron steel in the roll cage area(B pillar and roll bar. It is also almost 1,000 lbs heavier than the XC70.
    Both vehicles have a full complement of airbags, as well as the anti whiplash seats and 3 roll bars in the roof.
    Since the XC70's center of gravity is lower, it doesn't need to XC90's Roll Stability Control which helps to prevent vehicle rollovers. XC70 also gets a little better gas mileage. XC90 has more space for passengers and cargo.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    A Volvo or a CRV?
    That is like choosing between a safe and a beer can.

    I think that's a stretch...Perhaps a Tin Can and an Aluminum can.
  • magoldmagold Posts: 1
    My lease is expiring on the 2004 xc70 and I was thinking about moving up to the XC90. How does the cargo space compare with the 3rd row folded down?
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    XC90 can withstand roof crush forces up to 78,000 lbs.
    What can a CRV take?
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    The CR-V can turn in a 34 foot radius, to avoid being crushed.

    Actually, I'm kind of surprised to see the two mentioned in the same sentence. They are completely different price class vehicles.

    BTW, I now drive a Ford Freestyle, based on the C70/90 platform. I don't know the roof crush statistics, though.
  • orbit9090orbit9090 Posts: 110
    "Good luck" with either Volvo. My sisters two-year-old Volvo got broad-sided but the car's side airbags didn't deploy, leaving my sister with a concussion and unable to work for many months. Perhaps electronics just aren't the Swede's forte.

    Regarding CR-V safety: The 2007 Honda CR-V will incorporate Honda's Advanced Compatibility Engineering (ACE) safety structure, enhancing occupant protection and making it more crash compatible with vehicles of different sizes.

    image

    New Odyssey and Civic owners already benefit from ACE, not to mention the Japanese electronics that may prove to be far safer than Volvo's.

    http://corporate.honda.com/safety
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    ""Good luck" with either Volvo. My sisters two-year-old Volvo got broad-sided but the car's side airbags didn't deploy, leaving my sister with a concussion and unable to work for many months. Perhaps electronics just aren't the Swede's forte."

    Sorry to hear of your relative's accident.

    It is rather more likely that the computers decided that the particular side crash would not benefit from airbag deployment.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    ""Good luck" with either Volvo. My sisters two-year-old Volvo got broad-sided but the car's side airbags didn't deploy, leaving my sister with a concussion and unable to work for many months. Perhaps electronics just aren't the Swede's forte."

    Sorry to hear of your relative's accident.

    It is rather more likely that the computers decided that the particular side crash would not benefit from airbag deployment.

    The ACE is similar to several other manufacturors, including Volvo. They build the vehicles to collapse on impact, absorbing energy into the body structure instead of the occupant bodies. From the description of the XC70:

    "The front and rear crumple zones help to dissipate and distribute incoming collision forces to help reduce the physical strain on the car's occupants. The vehicle's structure keeps the passenger compartment intact, including the roof pillars and transverse roof profiles, since they absorb a great deal of the forces if the vehicle starts to roll. They form an interactive web of steel profiles, of which the most crucial parts are made of high-strength boron steel. In a side collision, the side-impact protection system helps distribute the crash forces across a large part of the car's body so as to help protection system helps distribute the crash forces across a large part of the car's body so as to help minimize the strain on the occupants."
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    XC90 had a similar system back in 03.

    Japanese are never first w/ safety innovations.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Volvo side airbags only deploy if the frame of the car is compromised.
  • kiiwiikiiwii Posts: 302
    Orbit, looks like the accident your sister had was similar to the crash test result done by US government. Take a look at the following site:

    http://www.safercars.gov/NCAP/Cars/3604.html

    In this case, the side bag deployed, but it didn't provide any protection to the head.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Look at the side test video. The test rig hit the car in the front door.
    Door took the brunt of the hit, no wonder the side bag was ineffective. I don't know whether the testers screwed up or what.
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,797
    ACe is different from Crumple zone, which Hondas have had for years. When Volvo was still building body on frame Volvo cars, Hondas already had crumple zones.

    Besides, wake up and smell the coffee, all you are buying is a glorified Ford. Might as well save $10,000 and buy a Ford.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    My Freestyle certainly doesn't drive like any Ford I've owned previously. However, that also speaks well of the Volvo design. If I had the $$ and the choice, I would drive both Volvo and Ford and see which one I preferred.
  • orbit9090orbit9090 Posts: 110
    stevedebi, you say "It is rather more likely that the (Volvo) computers decided that the particular side crash would not benefit from airbag deployment."
    This unfortunately enforces my suspicion that the Swedes build inferior electronics, as my sister certainly WOULD HAVE benefited from the side airbags. Her Volvo's "computers" obviously decided wrong.

    kiiwii, your impression of my sisters accident is a bit off.

    Just to clarify for everyone:
    The side airbags in my sister's Volvo failed to deploy when a car struck its side, crunching its doors, bending its frame, totalling both cars, and giving my sister a major concussion when her head banged into the interior side panel instead of an airbag.

    I'm not implying all Volvo's are unsafe. I suppose I have just lost faith. :(
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Um, Volvo stopped building body on frame cars in the 1940's.
    LONG before there even was a Honda corp.

    Please don't say anything if you don't know anything.
  • kiiwiikiiwii Posts: 302
    Orbit, Volvo may still have room to improve the air bag design. I had an accident about 4 years ago with a 960. It was a dead on front crash. The impact area was about 40-50% of the front (no side nor corner impact). My speed was about 20 mph. According to the insurance company, the other car was going about 30 mph. Both front air bags did not deploy. When the tow truck came, the driver thought my car had no air bags. When the car was towed to the dealer, I asked the mechanic if the bags should have deployed. He said yes. I'm not an expert on auto crash, but I assume the crash severity I had should activate the air bags.

    BTW, when I had the crash, my 960 was about 4-5 years old. I assume all the sensors and air bag chemical should still be in good working condition.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Did the impact go over or under the front bumper, or did the impact go directly into the front bumper?
    If the hood-grill took the brunt of the impact the airbags don't go off.
    Likewise if the other car slid under yours.
    If the bumper was pushed back into the body then the bags should have gone off.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Um, Volvo stopped building body on frame cars in the 1940's.
    LONG before there even was a Honda corp.

    Please don't say anything if you don't know anything.


    From the Honda corporate website:

    "Honda Motor Co. was established by Soichiro Honda in 1946"

    Maybe someone should follow their own advice ;).
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "From the Honda corporate website:

    "Honda Motor Co. was established by Soichiro Honda in 1946" "

    Yeah, but when did they start builting cars - 1960's, as I recall...
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,811
    "This unfortunately enforces my suspicion that the Swedes build inferior electronics, as my sister certainly WOULD HAVE benefited from the side airbags. Her Volvo's "computers" obviously decided wrong. "

    I seriously doubt that Volvo built the electronics. The most likely came from Japan or Taiwan.

    You are making an assumption - that the airbags should have deployed. If you think the did not go off correctly, file a lawsuit and get some professional opinions from qualified engineers who looked at the car and the crash.

    Or, it is possible they should have deployed and didn't. It is difficult to second guess the safety folks in their algorithms as to when the side airbags are needed and when they would hinder safety.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Correct, 1963 to be exact.

    Perhaps the original post was alluding to Honda not building cars in the 1940's but that's not what they said.

    The Honda (Motor) Company was mentioned and that's what I responded to.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Volvo stopped building body on frame cars at the end of the 30's.

    Honda started out building scooters and motor cycles.
    They did not construct their first car until the early 60's.

    Volvo built their first car in 1927.
    By the 40's Volvo already have cars with full safety cages and laminated windshields.
    In the 1950's Volvo patented the 3 point seat belt
    In the 60's(when Honda started building cars) Volvo's had 4 wheel disc brakes standard,w/ a dual split triangular braking system, padded dashes, crumple zones, safety locks on the doors, inertia reel safety belts and front head restraints.
    Plus, they also invented and tested the rear facing child seat.
    Volvo is one of 2 car companies in the world(Mercedes is the other) that maintain their own in house accident investigation team. ANY accident involving a Volvo of any type within 100 miles of Gothenburg is investigated by the team.
    I could go on and on, but y'all would probably get bored :)
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Thanks for the history lesson. But you left out one important fact related to Volvo. Volvo = Ford. Ford = Volvo.

    As this is a Volvo vs. Volvo discussion I won't bother to go in to detail about Honda and their state of the art crash test facility, it's vehicles that consistently earn high marks for safety, the fact that Honda will be the first automaker in the US to have standard head protection in every SUV it sells here, the fact that every car in the Indy 500 is a Honda, etc. I could go on as well :) .
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Sigh, Ford doesn't build, design or engineer Volvo's.
    If you believe they do I have some beachfront property in AZ for you to buy.
    Just a little fact checking on your part would bear this out but ignorance must be bliss I guess.

    BTW, Volvo already has head protection standard for all occupants on their SUV. It took 2 yrs after the XC90 came out for the MDX to get a 3rd row curtain.
    Volvo's head restraints are the only ones to get an across the board best rating.
    Volvo's crash facility in Sweden is world famous, it allows an unprecedented array of crash testing scenarios to be carried out. The entire building sits on a moveable track that allows high speed collisions at ANY angle you choose.

    Indy 500? Man that race isn't what it used to be.
    Its the only series Honda can compete in.
  • stmssstmss Posts: 206
    yes yes and Aston Martin=Ford and Landrover=Ford and Jaguar=Ford

    And every car in Champ is Ford powered and Honda still can't put a car on the F1 winners podium - seems to be Europeans doing this.

    If Ford=Volvo how come my Freestyle seats aren't as comfy as my Volvo seats? ;)
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    I'll put Honda's safety record up against any manufacturer including Ford...I mean...Volvo.

    http://corporate.honda.com/safety/foreveryone.aspx

    And to the other poster, yes Ford = Jaguar. Just look at the X-Type.

    Got to run....Enjoy your Volvo but be careful as I just saw this:

    Published May 21, 2006

    Volvo is recalling about 108,000 2003-06 XC90 sport-utility vehicles because of problems with ball joints in the front suspension area that could make it difficult to steer the vehicle when parking. In low-speed parking situations, the ball joints may become loose and make it difficult for drivers to maneuver. This could increase the risk of a crash.
  • stmssstmss Posts: 206
    And to the other poster, yes Ford = Jaguar. Just look at the X-Type.

    Just one model out of all those brands - not bad, considering state of Jaguar when Ford bought it.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    I tell you what. You get your Honda, I'll get a Volvo we'll hit each other head on @ 50 mph and see who does better.
    I've seen too many Honda's crash to take what you say seriously.
    I've seen alot of Volvo's crash and I know from first hand experience just how rugged they truly are.
    Safety is more than just some platitudes on a website my friend. How many safety patents does Honda have?
    How many of their safety innovations have the other comapnies copied? Zero.
    Why are some safety devices OPTIONAL on their products?
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    How many safety patents does Honda have?

    I don't know the exact number but there's one for the new Civic:

    "2006 Civic Highlights:

    • Four completely-redesigned models include the Civic Si Coupe, an ultra-efficient Civic Hybrid sedan, and well-equipped and technologically-advanced Civic Sedan and Civic Coupe

    • Advanced safety systems include Honda-exclusive Advanced Compatibility Engineering(TM) (ACE)(TM) Body Structure for vehicle-to-vehicle crash compatibility and collision energy management, and a long list of standard safety equipment including side curtain airbags, driver's and front passenger's side airbags, and anti-lock braking"

    Some safety features may be optional but not a bad list of standard safety features for a $16K vehicle. You'll spend a lot more on your Vord for the same safety features.

    I tell you what. You get your Honda, I'll get a Volvo we'll hit each other head on 50 mph and see who does better.

    I'd rather see it done at a test facility . And assuming the vehicles are comparable in weight I have no doubts about how the Honda will perform.
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