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Volvo XC70 Safety Issues

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Comments

  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    Let's put aside imprudent behavior for the moment. How many drivers have the training AND the practice to control a skid at 40+ mph due to sudden changes in road conditions, such as a puddle of water, an ice patch or gravel? How many can safely maneuver around an unexpected obstacle at moderate or higher speeds?

    Why not start there and MAKE people learn how to drive? I took my driving test when I was 17. I have not been re-tested since. I am 31 now, a lot can happen in 14 years. It scares me to think that 50 year olds drivng around today were tested some 35 years ago.

    And the test it self was joke. Drive straight, turn left, turn right, parallel park, make a 3 pointed u-turn. What about accident avoidance maneuvers? What about skid control?

    Some countries, Japan for example, have very stringent testing to get a driver's license. That way it limits the number of numbskulls behind the wheel posing danger to other people on the streets.

    In the US, we compensate for lack of driver's skill with bigger, heavier more electronic ladden vehicles. Why not solve the problem at the root, make every one go to Skip Barber or similar driving schools, make road tests a little more difficult than simple maneuvers. I guess, it would be too much to ask people to be responsible for their own actions.
  • Why not start there and MAKE people learn how to drive?

    Because it is impractical and impossible when it comes to the emergency avoidance maneuvers.
    I consider that I drive much better than the average driver. I was in the military service driving military vehicles in a wide variety of conditions, I took several defensive driving classes, I can drive manual for hours without using clutch, for instance, but nothing would help anyway in the situation that I have described a couple of postings above. Just because I do not do stunts everyday, my reflexes are not good enough, and could not match the electronics of my XC90, although, in theory, I new exactly what need to be done.

    Some countries, Japan for example, have very stringent testing to get a driver's license.

    Yes, but not to the degree of teaching the defensive driving anyway.

    In the US, we compensate for lack of driver's skill with bigger, heavier more electronic laden vehicles.

    This is not true. We drive bigger vehicles because they a) cheaper and b) we still can afford buying more gas than people in other countries.
    And when it comes to electronics, the European or Japanese versions of the same vehicle are pretty much the same.

    I guess, it would be too much to ask people to be responsible for their own actions.

    Yes it would, because the price for it is the death or severe injury.
  • calhoncalhon Posts: 87
    Every reasonable person would agree that better drivers are a part of the solution. Systems such as ESC and RSC are also parts of the solution. They compensate for the mistakes that people always make, and they do things that no human can.

    There is no training or testing program that will make drivers behave perfectly, or give them super-human abilities.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,719
    "There is no training or testing program that will make drivers behave perfectly, or give them super-human abilities."

    No, but you can have minimum standards. Having driven for a number of years in Germany, I can say that while it is a fast experience, the drivers are predictable in behavior, and follow the rules of the road. I think this is due to three factors:

    1. Mandatory driving classes before a license is issued.
    2. The expense of owning and driving a vehicle in Germany.
    3. Really stiff fines and very serious police officers.
  • daedae Posts: 143
    .Why would you need thicker steel, which makes a car heavier and cuts fuel efficency if you can achieve BETTER results with a harder stronger alloy?

    Obviously, you do not know what you are talking about - just mindlessly repeating buzzword from sales booklet.

    There is NOTHING special about steel used in Volvo. It is all about the basic engineering concept of stronger cage and predictable deformation in crumple zones. There are many ways to achieve that.

    And if anyting - excessive weight is Volvo's problem.

    Are you capable about discussing anything but Volvo's marketing spin on comon engineering solutions?
  • daedae Posts: 143
    As others have posted, and I'm sure you are aware, yaw is different than roll.

    And if you have actually read and comprehended what I had written you would not post nonsense.

    What I have written in the second paragrpah is that Honda has ANOTHER sensor, in ADDITION to yaw sensor in stability control. Is it that hard to read?
  • Easy, Dae.
    It's not just marketing. Volvo DOES use the steel that is several (I think x4) stronger that the normally used one.
    And Max usually KNOWS, what he is talking about, as he gets his info not just from the chat rooms.

    And, actually, Volvo XC90 is the lightest of 3 - Honda Pilot, Acura MDX, Volvo XC90.
  • Speaking of yaw, roll and nonsense....

    ...take it easy here too. As it has been already pointed out, that OTHER sensor in Honda, is not a part of the Stability system, it does not provide a feedback, but merely says "OUCH" and deploys the airbags.
    Here is a quote from Honda's marketing literature -

    "New for 2006, Pilot provides standard side curtain airbags for all three rows of seats. In addition to the protection they offer outboard occupants in the event of a side impact, these side curtain airbags are fitted with a rollover sensor to help provide protection in a rollover. Most side curtain airbags in this class are designed to provide side-impact protection, but rarely do they also provide protection in the event of a rollover."

    In this sense - Volvo has THIRD sensor, that does the same function deploying IC.

    Why it is so difficult for people to except Volvo's leadership in active and passive safety?
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Dae, you have no idea what you are talking about.
    Volvo does indeed use hardened steel in the cage area of the XC90.
    This use is widely reported.
    They aren't the only ones to use boron steel in the manufacture of their cars, the Germans do as well, but the XC90 represents the most widespread use of the material.
  • orbit9090orbit9090 Posts: 110
    > I tell you what. You get your Honda, I'll get a Volvo we'll hit each other head on 50 mph and see who does better.

    OK, you spend $32K on a little Volvo S40 AWD Automatic, and I'll spend $28K on a 4500lb Honda Ridgeline. Let's tango...

    Here's the last thing you will ever see...

    image
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    Hey, that was his threat...errr...challenge to me.

    Feel free to take the mantle and turn his Vord (or do you say Folvo) to scrap metal ;) .
  • I still choose Volvo.

    I have dropped one of my Volvo's for the routine maintenance at my friend's Indy Volvo shop, and he has shown me his son's 740 after it has been jammed between the delivery semi and some large pick-up (Ford or Dodge, the poor guy did not remember) in the chain multy-car accident at highway speed.
    The front and the rear parts were reduced to heaps of "corrugated" metal, but the passenger compartment safety cage was practically intact, with all glasses in place, and all doors that could be opened.

    Knowingly, modern Volvo's (including S40) are even better.

    You all will understand why I drive Volvo and Volvo only, once you would be with me there.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,719
    "The front and the rear parts were reduced to heaps of "corrugated" metal, but the passenger compartment safety cage was practically intact, with all glasses in place, and all doors that could be opened.

    Knowingly, modern Volvo's (including S40) are even better.

    You all will understand why I drive Volvo and Volvo only, once you would be with me there."

    I read recently where a woman driving a new Honda Fit drove into the oncoming freeway lanes, and then ran head on into an SUV. The woman walked away from the accident.

    At one time Volvo was tops for safety - and other manufacturors were substandard. These days I think that Honda (with their ACE frames and standard safety equipment) are just as safe. I feel pretty confident in my Ford Freestyle, for that matter (but then the FS has Volvo components).
  • No doubts, all cars are getting safer, though, all cars are getting more reliable.

    But people do go with Honda because of the perceived superior reliability, it is where Honda shines for years.

    Same, I go with Volvo because of the perceived superior safety, it is where Volvo shines for years.

    I feel very comfortable with the reliability of my Volvo S80 and XC90, but they have, in my view, a definite edge over Honda Accord and Pilot in areas of active and passive safety features, quality of build, exterior design, etc., so I choose Volvo.

    Doesn't it seem reasonable?
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Heh, heh.
    I already know the outcome of a collision like that.
    We have a customer driving an 05 S40 hit a Semi head on at speed and walked away.

    It made the Volvo Saved My Life Club.
    Check it out online.
  • drive62drive62 Posts: 637
    We have a customer driving an 05 S40 hit a Semi head on at speed and walked away.

    Again I'll say it, maybe Volvo should be giving driving lessons to it's buyers.
  • Actually, It does, UNLIKE many other companies.
    I have attended Drive for Life defensive driving event once.
    It was very educational and eye-opening. Gives you much more confidence in a car you drive too.
  • stevedebistevedebi LAPosts: 3,719
    "Doesn't it seem reasonable?"

    Well, I'm not arguing that Volvos aren't safe. But I think many other cars have a similar level of safety.

    They tested the European spec Prius by driving a Toyota Land Cruiser into the side ("T-Bone") at 60 KMph. The Prius protected the occupants.
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Well it had better, thats only 37mph.

    Try it at 50!
  • volvomaxvolvomax Posts: 5,274
    Again I'll say it, maybe Volvo should be giving driving lessons to it's buyers.

    that is not germaine to the discussion.
    The fact is that a driver in a Volvo not only survived but walked away.
    there is a reason they call the "accidents"
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