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Toyota Camry Hybrid MPG-Real World Numbers

1404143454650

Comments

  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Hope you have done the 90K recommended timing belt change, if not, be prepared for a world of hurt when it lets go. That was one of the deciding factors against my getting a 2006 TDI when I had a chance, didn't like that written in stone change the belt along with a few other components, and have seen and heard the horror stories about cost when it does let go. The other reason I didn't get one was the financing was way too high, and the dealer wasn't willing to go down on the price, he was pretty much hung on MSRP. I wound up with a Prius instead, with 2.9% financing, and 53 MPG. BUT when I feel the need for that soothing clack clack of a diesel, I hop in my F350 and give it a go. :D
  • cdn_tchcdn_tch Posts: 194
    Orly1, what happened with the hypermiler who test drove your car?

    Did you just need to learn so techniques or wa sthere a problem with the car?

    Please let us know so we can all learn from your experience.

    Thanks.
  • cdn_tchcdn_tch Posts: 194
    jgallant said: I have had my 2009 TCH for about 6 weeks and have been tracking the gas consumption carefully. The web site (Canadian) says I should get 50 MPG city, combined and highway driving.

    After 6800 KM (4225 Miles) I am getting only 40 MPG. I know that the info on the web site is an "estimate" but it shouldn't be 20% out. I don't drive with a heavy foot, in fact I try to get that little "excellent" message every time I shut the car off.

    Has anyone experienced poor gas mileage like this?


    I put a short answer into the 'Ask the Community' question area, but here is a longer post...

    First a few questions.
    - What part of the country do you live in?
    - Do you use a block heater?
    - How far/how long are you average trips?

    Some general comments:
    - The ECU is programmed to reduce emissions first, get better mileage second
    - One full throttle acceleration an on ramp easily negates 10-15 minutes of easy driving
    - After the coolant temp reaches 70oC, you have to be stopped for ~7 seconds for the car to transition to Mode 4, which will let you get into EV mode at any speed below 64kmh.
    - Until the engine reaches 80oC, having the heat on will generally keep the engine running regardless of other factors.
  • Thanks for the info on getting into Ev mode and how the car works while warming up.
    I will be testing those suggestions from now on.
    I live in Vernon BC Canada. It's in the Okanagan Valley near Kelowna. It has not been that cold here yet, never below freezing. I do have the heat on now but most of the Kilometers on the car were on a trip from here to Vegas in October. I wish I had known about feathering on that trip.
    My average trip now will be about 15KM or about 10 Miles. I suspect with the cold weather coming the MPG will not get any better except on longer trips.
    I didn't know anything about Mode 4 so from now on I'll be trying to hit that stop light on the way to work so I can stop for the 7 seconds.
    Thanks again.
  • cdn_tchcdn_tch Posts: 194
    There are so many nuances to getting the most out o fthe TCH it is worth reading the
    new owner FAQ at GreenHybrid.com.

    Mileage starts to go down when temps start going below 10oC. You use the defroster, heat in the cabin, winter gas, etc... Looks like Vernon also has a less than flat terrain, so that will hurt as well depending on how much you go up and down hills. Also, don't use the CC in hilly terain, that hard acceleration is really rough on mileage.

    15km is a good distance, but I find that my 10km is not enough to reach full operating temp in the winter, even with it plugged in at home.

    If you have questions, ask. There are some amaizingly knowledgeable people on these forums that can go down into the technical details of the TCH. I've learned a lot, but still have way more to go... :D
  • I just purchased a used 08 TCH with 19k miles on it. I use it to drive to work, approx 7 miles each way, with lots of stops and starts and hills both directions. I seem to be getting only about 23MPG, which is rather disappointing considering it said 35MPG in city driving. I live in DC, so there are many lights and stops. Am I just out of luck, and looking at owning a car that isn't any more fuel efficient than the car I just got rid of? (a '98 Acura with 23MPG average)
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    The TCH works best on flat roads and good distances between lights. If you cant keep the traction batteries charged up where you can run EV, then your mileage will suffer. Also driving 7 miles is barely enough time for the engine to fully warm up in winter for it to switch to EV mode. Wait until summer and you will see the MPG improve. There isn't anything wrong with the car, that is just the way it is. I owned a 2009 and put 34K on it, had the car been better quality and better handling I would have kept it, but it did do great on getting MPG, I would see 35 winter and 38 summer, with 43 on the highway. In Chicago driving, if I didn't catch the light timing just right, the MPG would plummet, but if I could catch the lights and maintain a nice steady speed I would get about 34.

    Practice hypermiling, and pulse and glide, and visit prius chat for more tips on driving a Hybrid. You can get better than what you are getting, you just need to learn how to drive it, right now you are driving it like a normal car, and if it was an I4 Camry, that is about what you would be getting, but once you get the hang of getting it into EV, and learn how to tweak the go pedal, you will see the mileage go up.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Short trips kill the MPG. Also, cold mornings running the heater (which usually also engages the air compressor) is another MPG killer.

    You have intersected two unfortunate situations, which to me means that your MPG for that particular commute in the cold weather will always suffer.

    You will do better in mild weather when neither the A/C nor the heater will run.

    Outside your commute, you should do fine. I have a 2007 TCH with almost 60K miles, and I have averaged 34.8 MPG for my entire ownership.

    Good Luck !!!
  • Thanks, that's good to know. I have already gotten better at trying to glide and not accelerate the car as a 'normal' car would be driven, and I find myself staring at the MPG meter, hoping it will increase, while watching the gas needle going down! Unfortunately the distance sort of is what it is, as are the hills, so it's hard to make that any better. I have been gliding more, and trying not to sit on the gas pedal, too...what did you mean by keeping the "traction batteries up"? I bought the car used from a dealer that didn't know a ton about the car, so I didn't get a tutorial about what the "B" setting is on the gear shift, and how to better conserve/use battery power.
    Thx.
  • I have the same car in the same region (Baltimore), with the same length commute (7 miles). I have the identical experience, in winter. You don't start to get significant mileage improvements until the car warms up, and in winter that doesn't occur for 10-15 mins, which is when your (and my) commute ends. So you are essentially driving a non-hybrid for those 10-15 mins, and the mileage reflects it. You will see a marked improvement when temps are moderate, but I have never reached the EPA 35 MPG in short-term city driving, although I might be able to with gentler starts after stops. Highway driving will get you 32-40 depending on temps and length of trip, and you can reach 35 MPG even in winter for a decently long trip. The numbers I have seen on this and other forums is simply not what I get. I think I could improve the highway #s with hybrid driving technique, but I have never conditioned myself to change my ways. So, you are in for a little disappointment re mileage in your winter commute, but it will be better in other seasons and in other driving settings.
  • larsblarsb Posts: 8,204
    Another technique you'll find useful is "feathering" the accelerator.

    As you are driving at a steady speed, let the accelerator come up just slightly then re-apply pressure, all in the span of about 2 seconds. You will notice a spike in MPG and your speed will for the most part remain unchanged due to forward momentum.

    It's really handy for picking up an extra 1-2 mpg per tank.

    The "B" is for engine braking on steep hills or other times when engine braking is handy. It does not increase MPG. Use it very sparingly.
  • 1020 miles on it now, first mileage experiment last weekend. Fill tank, go 125 miles or so on secondary roads, mostly 45-65mph, 50F, tripmeter says 45 mpg when I arrive. Turn around, take same distance back only on interstate, cruise set to 80mph. Arrive home, refill, about 42mpg for the 250 mile roundtrip. Trip computer says 42 mpg.

    I assume I got 45 or so outbound, and 40 inbound on the interstate to get a 42 average. Not bad considering it isn't broken in yet.

    Oil change and 3000 mile trip are next, will report back with more numbers then.
  • kingfans1kingfans1 Posts: 137
    hi my regular 2006 toyota camry le v6 average 32.3 mpg for 738.6 miles driven... warm weather driving. no ac/heater. 95 % highway, cruise.. the car have 176,000 miles.

    so I am sure THC can do better.

    http://www.fuelly.com/driver/hondavtec/camry
  • 3000 mile round trip. Tank low MPG of 32 doing 80mph in rain and wind in Oklahoma. Tank high MPG of 44 doing 70 mph south through Louisiana to New Orleans, and then west to Cameron. Haven't calculated final averages, but it should be close to 40mpg for the entire trip. Low mileage tanks usually accompanied by either speed or headwinds, no major use of A/C. Not bad. 4500 miles on it so far, probably not fully broken in yet.
  • tmacmntmacmn Posts: 1
    I just purchased a 2010 TCH, last on the lot. They have fully transitioned to the 2011s. Just finished 150 miles with an avg of 40 MPG. It was a combination of round the block trips to show off the car, and a road trip to Wisconsin with road construction and stop and go driving. Temperature today for the road trip was 80 deg. This is my first hybrid and we're definitely still adjusting. I see the potential. While hybrid mileage may go down in the winter, it does on my gas guzzlers for sure.
  • hsinghsing Posts: 1
    Highway + Local in San Jose, CA

    Average Miles per Gal 43.2
    Average days betw'n filling 17.61
    Average Gal per filling 13.69
    Average $ per filling $41.94
    Average Miles per filling 590.71
    Average $/Gal (San Jose CA) $3.06
    Average $ per day $2.38
    Average Miles per day 33.55

    In summer I can get up to 46.5 mpg but only 39 mpg in winter.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    I was very dissappointed with the Camry. I bought a new 2009 Camry Hybrid, and within 1 week found a few things about its build that left me feeling that toyota is not all it is cracked up to be. The hybrid drivetrain, Excellent. Car build quality, POOR. From the wind noise, to the rattles, to the sticking sun roof, to the very uncomfortable seats, I dont see how the Camry is rated so high. In any case, I got 32k mechanically trouble free miles out of it before I finally had enough of its poor handling and uncomfortable seats.

    Now if toyota can redesign the car to handle like the Fusion Sport and be more comfortable, they would have a car I would go back to. Enjoy yours, I didn't enjoy mine. :sick:
  • I'm posting this because Ford is advertising their 2011 Fusion Hybrid gets 10 more MPG in city driving than the Camry Hybrid. I'm astonished! It makes no sense. I have a 2007 Camry Hybrid that just turned 100,000 miles. I've kept track of every drop of gas into the tank. Last mpg calculation was just under 37MPG; that's city and highway, winter and summer. Of course, winter weather kills mpg, (it was -15F this morning here in northern Wisconsin). However, I have no trouble seeing 34MPG this time of year, and 40MPG in the summer. Admittedly, my driving environment is pretty favorable. Town is three miles of rolling hills away, and my trips average ten miles or less. Our highways discourage much over 65 mph. However, we've taken numerous long trips across the country at interstate speeds and manage to still achieve very satisfactory mpg. On top of that, after almost five years, there isn't a squeak or a rattle to be heard. The car is as quiet as a church. I've just installed my third set of tires, (Yokohama Avid TRZ), and they're the icing on the cake and really terrific tires. (The original Bridgestones were a joke). Finally, for what it's worth my Camry Hybrid was one of the earliest off the production line. It was built in Japan, and I'm sure that Toyota was watching every turn of the wrench. I'm sure the Ford Fusion Hybrid is a fine car, but I'm still mystified why the Camry has taken such a hit.
  • acdiiacdii Posts: 753
    Simple answer, the Fusion is a better car. I had a Camry Hybrid, and I saw similar results in MPG, but overall the car was just plain boring. Material wise, it was below par, the seat cloth was thin and showed signs of wear within 30k miles, the sunroof stuck, it had wind noise, and the dash squeaked. Mechanically the car was superb, but creature comfort wise, handling, and quality wise, it was not up to the standards I would expect of such a highly rated car. Before that I had a Prius, I got up to 64 MPG, but the car scared me, cross winds were nasty, they blew the car around, and the traction control was over sensitive, cutting power to the wheels if a tire slipped a bit. Not good when you are trying to merge into 55 MPH traffic for a dead stop.

    I traded the Camry in for a 2010 Fusion Sport, and although I don't get 34 MPG, I enjoy driving once again, and the quality of the car is right where I would expect it to be, far better than what Toyota has. The car also handles quite well, and once I get rid of the lousy OEM tires, the car will be even better to drive.

    The Hybrid Fusion, is rated at 40, the Toyota 34, Considering just about everyone can meet or exceed EPA on a Hybrid, the Fusion will still be getting better MPG than the Camry. 1445 Miles on a single tank of fuel is nothing to joke about.
  • The Fusion is definitely a nice car, but if you think you can get 1,445 miles on a single tank, I'm not sure what you're smoking :)

    I also used to have a Camry hybrid. I had the same issue with the dash rattling and some noise from the sunroof. Other than that the car was rock solid. I have a Prius now (The improved 2010 model). With my Prius I consistently get over 50 mpg in warm weather and in the 40's in the winter. I have even driven on the highway when the wind was blowing really hard and had no problems. The new Prius has a "power" mode that allows you to accelerate pretty fast. I have no trouble passing most cars when I want to. So whatever problems existed in the older-model Priuses have been solved, in my opinion. It's one of the best cars you can buy period, hybrid or not.

    I have test-driven a Fusion hybrid and it is also a very nice car, although a tad smaller on the inside than the Camry. The Fusion has a similar but slightly different hybrid system than the Camry hybrid. You can actually drive it on just the battery up to 47 mph, instead of the maximum 41 mph that the Camry allows. From what I have read and what people have told me, I think you can expect a real-world average of about 3-4 mpg better in city driving compared to the Camry, and about the same on the highway. So it's not as huge of a difference as what they try to say in the commercials.
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