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Tire Rack Problems

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Comments

  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    The Subaru wheels may not be any better. I have bent several rims on my Subaru. 16" OEM 2.5RS wheels when I hit a few potholes in NYC and once when I hit a concrete slab that they lay down where bus stops are. They had torn up the asphalt and not the concrete so I hit about a 1"-2" slab of concrete and put a nice dent in my rims.

    Non-OEMs are generally less sturdy than ones that come original on cars, that's why I usually stick to OEM rims on my cars.

    -mike
  • burdawgburdawg Posts: 1,524
    OEM's also meet a lot tighter run out spec. Aftermarket wheels, especially wide diameter ones, can have 5x the runout and be considered OK.
  • tltypektltypek Posts: 8
    Yeah, my VR4 still has stock wheels at $850 a pop, no problems with those. This was my first street-tuning effort, as I couldn't afford the car I wanted, so I turned a lesser car into a close facsimile for the bargain price of $13,000 over invoice.. I took delivery of my TL with a substantial amount of re-tuning by Comptech. The 12.8 inch brakes required aftermarket wheels (stock 17 inch, just a spoke design that could clear the massive calipers)..... I do a lot of aggressive mountain backroad driving (paved roads).
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    hmm, aggressive + on-road driving is a recipie for disaster. I encourage you to save it for an HPDE or Auto-x. Far far safer for both you and the general public.

    -mike
  • tltypektltypek Posts: 8
    These are private roads on acreage owned by people I know.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Cool, private roads are great, have at it! :)

    -mike
  • Something is definitely wrong here. I have been driving for 37 years here in New York City and New Jersey. I have driven on some roads that are worse than Berlin in the 1940's. I have only dented one rim in my life that was when I hit a huge pothole in my M3 going about 80 miles an hour. The rim bent and the tire exploded. I cannot picture having so many problems with wheels on a regular commuting basis.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I think a lot of it has to do with the lower profile tires folks are running these days. The OEM rims I bent driving in NYC were wearing 215-45-16 tires with a slender sidewall on them. Often times cars now are running 18" wheels with 45 or 40 series tires and a small sidewall, as well as stiffer sidewalls than in the past with run-flats etc. All this contributes to rim-abuse/damage IMO.

    -mike
  • zambokneezamboknee Posts: 1
    ....my engine shut off. I was pushing through a few standing waters (about 6-8 inches deep after heavy rains) in my Toyota 4Runner and on the last one, my engine just shut off. The electrical system works fine it's just that the engine won't turn at all. Some info: the air filter was soaking wet, starter won't engage.
    Any ideas what I screwed up here? Is my engine toast? Should I let it sit for a couple days (tow driver recommended that)? Is there a minor repair I can do on my own? I had 4 years of Automotive Repair training in high school so I know which way is up on a wrench.
    ugh. but thanks
  • kiawahkiawah Posts: 3,666
    Figure out whether the problem is electrical, or mechanical.

    Water doesn't compress, so if you sucked water into your cylinders, the engine will be locked and nothing will be able to turn the engine over. Pull out the spark plugs, and see what comes out (water, you are in trouble). Carefully stick a narrow air nozzle into the spark plug hole into the cylinder, and see what blows out when you open up the air to it. Check the oil dipstick, see if the level is higher than normal. Oil floats on water, so if water got into your crankcase, your oil level would be high. You could also try draining the oil to see what comes out.

    Water in the cylinder yields broken connecting rods, and crankshafts.....in addition to the obvious rust ruining the bearings problem.

    If the engine checks out mechanically, then get a volt meter on the base electricals. Check that you have +13 volts on the main power feed to the starter. Check to see if you have +13 volts on the fuse buss. Check then to see when you turn the key in the ignition, whether you have +volt feed to the starter solenoid.

    Good luck.
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