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Mazda CX-7 Real World MPG

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Comments

  • russ_49russ_49 Posts: 54
    I'm not at all worried about it! I traded in an 02 Milli S which required premium fuel, for this. I'm a huge Mazda fan, this is my 6th in a 5 year period! I actually think that the MPG that I get is about the same as my Milli. And I can truely afford to buy whatever I want!

    By the way, I was the one who, when watching the earlier posts regarding the need for premium fuel, to tell the poster to stop complaining, and go buy themselves a Kia!!! And if an extra $4 a week for gas is going to influence your decision, go look at a Hugo!!!

    When the page was setup, I figured I'd just post some real numbers so that people can see what this does.

    OK, also off the soap box here, and loving every minute in my CX!!! ;)
  • edwardsfedwardsf Posts: 187
    Well, if you want to really compare an all wheel drive vehicle to another all wheel drive vehicle regarding gas mileage, you might try the Audi A4 Quattro Avant which gets EPA 22 and 30 (the CX-7 gets 18/24). While it does not have the clearance for off road driving, the A4 is faster, quieter, handles and brakes better and has about the same amount of room as a CX-7.

    Also, it is odd that some folks are getting mileage better than EPA's (when real world drivers normally get less). You are probably a very careful driver - with a fun car like a CX-7, I would have trouble not driving fast. Also, some posters here look like they are using the notoriously inaccurate car computers to calculate.
  • honakerhonaker Posts: 74
    CX-7s don't have a trip computer.
  • wmiiiwmiii Posts: 10
    Just turned over 2400 miles and have been keeping a detailed record of all fuel used since picking the CX-7 up with 12 miles on the odo. So far I am showing a total of 120.9 gallons to cover 2377 miles. This calculates out to be 19.66 mpg. All but about 200 miles have been to and from work on a 20 mile stretch of IH35 in Austin during morning and afternoon rush hour. I keep very accurate records on my PDA's spreadsheet. On the one hiway trip I estimated around 24 or so mpg. I do try to keep my foot out of the TURBO as much as possible to conserve fuel but I also do enjoy the feeling it gives to hit it at least a few times a day. Probably an average driver. Very Very pleased with the car. :)
  • astegmanastegman Posts: 171
    Still awaiting the arrival of my CX-7; should be here any day now. While I have no intention of tracking its gas mileage, I am curious about one thing. I drive 30 miles one way to work. The first 20 miles are on a beautiful stretch of road (2 lane), which is residential - but since I leave fairly early and it's not a heavily populated area, I'm able to do those 20 miles non-stop going between 50-60 mph (yes, I'm speeding at that point; SSSSHH!). Is that considered highway? How would that be classified? It's definitely not stop and go.

    My last 10 miles are truly highway - the Merritt Parkway (Connnecticut).

    This is purely to satisfy my own curiousity; as I mentioned, I'm not particulary concerned about the car's mileage.
  • wjbushsrwjbushsr Posts: 135
    Sounds like hwy to me...

    My own idea of city driving is stop and go, period. Since I drive 82 miles one way a day when I work, about 30 of that is inner city with some stop and go... The rest is all out Texas Highways, WOOOO HOOOO!!! :shades:
  • honakerhonaker Posts: 74
    That sounds right to me too. Highway is cruising along in higher gears. City is stop and go.

    You drive 82 miles each way to work? OUCH!
  • wjbushsrwjbushsr Posts: 135
    14 days a month... shift work and 14 days off!
    Killer times :shades:
  • russ_49russ_49 Posts: 54
    I figure that this is about as good as I'm going to get, went to NH over the weekend last week, plus this is going to be for three tanks, 856.7 miles 41.566 gals 20.61 MPG. I must say just a sweet ride!!! 2590 on the oto!:shades:
  • carlitos92carlitos92 Posts: 458
    Well, THAT hurt. :surprise:
    The first tank I had full control over since taking delivery got filled up today. Vehicle is a GT AWD and has 550 miles on it now. My driving was 60% hwy/40% city. I consider myself an agressive driver, though I am taking it relatively easy during break-in (if the engine's ever hit 5000 rpm in the past two weeks, it sure wasn't on purpose).

    249 miles / 14.8 gallons = 16.8 mpg.

    I could've gone further before filling up, but the timing was right today. We'll keep watching as the car gets in its groove...
    -c92
  • 4000 lbs is not going get as good as good mpg as 10 lbs bicycle but I want the most bang for the buck I can get.
  • yes turbos always lag a bit till 2500 rpm of course you bring the rpm up to 2500 first but most people dont like holding the brake then hit the gas first ten release the brake at 2500rpm
  • bobd22bobd22 Posts: 1
    Overall 14.7 mpg for the first 621 miles (42.2gal of 91). First three tanks almost entirely city, some freeway in the last tank. A/C on all the time!

    Driving style is Dr Jekyl & Mr Hyde :) - I try to drive economically in traffic, but like to hit the curves when I get a chance
  • carlitos92carlitos92 Posts: 458
    Second tank's mileage = 17.1 mpg. Driving mix same as before. Not much of an improvement, but then again, I am starting to put the right foot down a little more... :)
  • Please keep the posts coming....maybe it just needs to break in and if you are getting mileage as stated on the EPA guidelines than great! I know we'd all love to see better gas mileage and wish we could get at least 19-20 city. At $3.39 a gallon at any income level it still hurts! I wanted a car with at least 20 plus mpg city and was not planning on the CX 7 but one test drive and I was hooked!!! Sometimes I wonder if I should get something more fuel efficient(Mazda 5) since the prices are suppose to get worse.....or maybe it will be better someday....I don't know. Argh, I always love the cars with lower MPG and are more fun to drive...case in point...I have an Mazda RX 8!!! ;)
  • Another disappointing MPG, 14.41 MPG (90/10 Local/highway)
  • Here's an insteresting data point for everyone. I live in Texas, and Interstate 10 west of San Antonio and east of El Paso now has an 80 mph speed limit. I have an AWD CX-7, and with the cruise control on and going around 83 to 84 mph, I was averaging only 18.5 mpg (with about 6,000 miles on the odometer). However, driving over to Houston two days later with the cruise control at 70 mph, I got 21 mph, and that included some city mileage.

    I've read the optimal speed for gas mileage is somewhere around 60 mph, and that it drops off after that. I'd never had the opportunity to measure it in such an apples-to-apples way before, but now I'm a believer!
  • tidestertidester Posts: 10,110
    Great report!

    tidester, host
  • carlitos92carlitos92 Posts: 458
    What, you mean the government's old 55 mph speed limit was based on FACTS??? :D

    I love that stretch of highway and can't wait until I'm down there in a few months, low-mpg or not. Thanks for the info!
  • honakerhonaker Posts: 74
    I'd have to check again to be sure, but I think if I cruise around 80 or so on level ground, the rpms are almost but not quite high enough to use the turbo boost. At around 84, I think the rpms were up in the boost range, so that could cause some of the mileage difference in addition to the increased wind resistance.
  • rethwilmrethwilm Posts: 24
    I have 1000 miles on my CX-7 and with two fill ups after the initial "full" tank from the dealer I have averaged 20MPG. The driving has been about 60/40 City/hiway. Went 320 miles on 16.1. I am hoping it improves by at least 10% I have been easy on it since it is in the break in period, but find myself zipping through the gears quite a bit.
  • sssfegysssfegy Posts: 132
    HI I work for Mazda and noticed you take it easy on your car, you should not do that. For the first 500-1000 miles you should drive like you normally do, rev it up but do not gun it, or set the cruise control on (do not mainatain same speeds for a long period of time) you should let the engine get used to operating in every condition, and not for a long time. Also change your oil at a 1000-1500 miles to let engine chips out.
  • astegmanastegman Posts: 171
    Also change your oil at a 1000-1500 miles to let engine chips out.

    When I picked up my car last week, I was told I should change the oil at 7500 miles. What are engine chips?
  • sssfegysssfegy Posts: 132
    When the engine is new, a few metal chips inside the combustion chamber tend to fall out , there are very tinny but very easy to get stuck in one of the moving parts and becomes part of it, every engine in the market will do the same, that is due to the finish of the metal inside.
    You change the oil at 7500 after that, which I would not recommend on any vehicle out there, the vehicle will run and operate fine, but you will notice a change in performance, you will notice that when you change the oil, you'll feel you have more power. Manufacturers increase oil inetervals for convenience nothing less, but if you want to keep for a long time to come I would do it at 3000-5000 and it would depend on type of oil you use. Hope this helps.
  • pctechpctech Posts: 43
    After a little over 2700 miles, my lowest MPG is 17.93 and highest 22.05. This is mostly higway driving and I must confessI'm neither the slowest driver nor do I always have a light foot when accelerating! I've filled up several times with 89 octane ("mid-grade") and have noticed no difference in run quality or power. But the 10-cent lower cost seems nearly meaningless at over $3.00 per gallon! Anyway, LOVE the car! :P
  • astegmanastegman Posts: 171
    I swore up, down, and sideways that I wasn't going to keep track of the MPG, but...

    After the 4th tank of gas, the MPG was 21. I'd say about 80% of that was highway driving. It was also the first week of driving the car in the usual manner - that is, back and forth to work during the week, and local town errands on the weekends. The first 3 tanks were used on vacation, which is not representative of the way I normally use the car. The MPG was very "meh" - so-so, about 16 MPG, but we took the car on vacation 2 days after getting it, so I didn't expect much.

    However, I was pleased with this last mileage.
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    What ssfegy says is correct. When an engine is new: the object of not making fast starts from stoplights, no hard braking, not using the cruise control, and varying your speeds/rpms as much as you can -- is to help the rings to seat properly in the cylinders. The pieces of metal flaking off come from the seating process. Some companis use lasers to machine the cylinders and say not to worry about varying the speed. But others have stayed with this time-proven procedure.

    When the rings do not seat properly there is the chance the engine will start using oil. Bad!

    Also, a new engine is tight and needs breaking in with low stress on the moving parts until it losens up. This is the reason for lower fuel economy in the beginning. As the engine gets close to 5000 miles your fuel economy will improve, but do not expect 29mpg at 85mph.

    The saying that a vehicle will get its best economy at 60mph applies to non-turbo engines, essentially, and really means that at 3000rpm, or below, you will get the best economy since 2700 to 3000rpm are the revs at that speed for most small engines. It also means do not rev it above 3000 at ANY TIME to squeeze out the highest mileage. Nobody drives like that and as ssfegy pointed out you need to vary the revs/speeds so the engine can get use to a wide range of rpms.

    Engines that have been babied and always driven at low rpms are a bad deal when sold to a second buyer who normally drives at high rpms -- sometimes blowing up when pressed hard. Think of the little old lady cars which just drove around town. ;)

    If most of your driving is city and suburbs do your engine a favor and take it for a run on a highway during the week, let it stretch its legs. Drive 5 or 10 miles, exit, and return home.

    fowler3
  • fowler3fowler3 Posts: 1,919
    Reading from the begining I see several misconceptions about which fuel one should use. Do NOT use regular 87 in the CX-7, it requires premium to prevent pre-ignition, which is very harmful to the engine. Also, premium gas has additional additives to protect the engine not used in regular. Mazda has used the latest technology to get the most out of one of the best 4-cylinder engines made, don't ruin it by going el cheapo.

    If you hear a loud knocking sound coming from the engine get off the throttle IMMEDIATELY and pull off the road, let it sit for a few minutes. Sounds like a diesel. The engine may smell hot, because it probably is. That's pre-ignition. the fuel/air mixture igniting prematurily usually due to the wrong fuel.

    The best way to check economy is to fill up at the same gas station using the same pump. Pumps vary. Set it for auto-shutoff and do not fill to the top of the filler pipe. Repeat test several times in succesion.

    fowler3
  • steverstever YooperlandPosts: 40,153
    Engines that have been babied and always driven at low rpms are a bad deal

    There's another school of thought from the biking community that says you should drive them hard right off the showroom floor; the claim is that the engine will have more pep in the years to come that way.

    I'm not clear on why hard braking would affect the rings?

    Moderator
    Need help navigating? stever@edmunds.com - or send a private message by clicking on my name.

  • carlitos92carlitos92 Posts: 458
    Seems like he's lumped the easy braking in with the engine break-in period, but the two are unrelated. Hard braking would glaze the brake pads and prevent them from bedding in to the rotors properly, but shouldn't have any effect on the engine.

    On the other hand, one of the worst things you can do to a green engine is to downshift (in either a manual or automatic car) to use engine braking to help stop the vehicle. This puts a lot of shock on the rings. Hard braking by itself normally doesn't cause an automatic transmission to shift down through the gears in a way that would harm the engine.
    -c92
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