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Kia Sedona Brakes

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Comments

  • rc7965rc7965 Posts: 2
    I have a 2004 Kia Sedona. It is very random, but at times my brake pedal gets hard and when braking, the rotors feel like they are warped. if the discs are warped, it would happen all of the time. the front end only behaves this way when the brake pedal gets hard. Any suggestions would be helpful.
  • Maybe you have air in your brake system. Probably not the rotors as it would be constant. Get it checked as you don't want to have any brake failures.
  • hjc1hjc1 Posts: 183
    I don't think it's air in the brake line. The peddle would have a soft spongy feel if air was in the line.
  • Good point. Maybe your conditions you are driving in? Snow by chance? Non-the-less it is worth having a professional check it out.
  • I have had brake problems since 2007 and nothing seems to help. I had drums turned several times and finally replaced and the pads changed 4 or 5 times. The van still chatters when you apply the brakes and I am afraid for my wife to drive it. No one seems to know what to do to fix it.
  • What are the specific problems? I have been on the road of discovery with my Sedona. My wife I thoufght was to blame, I was wrong. The rear brakes has adjustment components that don't work well, they cause more use in the front brakes and a peddle that drops to the floor. We were averaging 15k to 25k per set of brakes.
  • My brake adjuster (the part that slides into the groves) has broke three times on the left rear drum. I am fed up, when this happens the adjustment gets screwed up and the brake peddle has to be pumped to get the brakes to work. Oh, it's a 2003 Sedona. Other than that the cars has been pretty good. 122k miles and still going strong. AC pump wnet out last year.
  • katrogkatrog Posts: 10
    Kia says there is not a problem. If you will call them @ 800-333-4542, they will tell you about how many cars they have on the road with no problems they are aware of. I've put up with brake problems for 5 years on my 2004 KIA Sedona and finally a dealer told me the problem can't be fixed. I gave up and went to independent brake shops to have brake shoe linings cleaned and adjusted, rotors turned, brakepads replaced, brakes cleaned and adjusted, pivot joints & backing plate lubed, rear shoes adjusted and rear drums replaced ,but the brakes still squeel and grind. Kia will tell you to call them, & tell them which dealer you will take the car to and they will work with them BUT depending on what you have tried to have the fixed outside of a dealership, they, of course, cannot be responsible for. I haven't taken this last step yet but I'm not hopeful. Good luck to you!
  • katrogkatrog Posts: 10
    Did you ever find any class action suit info?
  • Since there are so many people that have experienced brake problems with the Kias and Kia is in denial-isn't there a federal agency that 'checks up' on these automobile companies that are allowed to sell here in the USA? and protect us being being taken...I will never refer anyone to Kia~their service & warranties STINKS!
  • baz63baz63 Posts: 4
    I think the DOT is much too busy beating up on Toyota. With all the Kia jokes circulating out there who'd take our plight seriously? :confuse:

    We also went with aftermarket drilled & slotted rotors on our '06 to avoid a potential accident. Hit one puddle and the OEM's warped big time. All Kia gave us was denial. :P
  • katrogkatrog Posts: 10
    Go to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform site and report them
  • lavrishevolavrishevo Posts: 312
    edited February 2010
    Kia warranties are much better then 90% of the manufacturers out there. The fact that the 05 and under have undersized brakes for the weight of the van, which leads to the brakes wearing down faster then usual is unfortunate. No manufacturer covers brake pads and rotors, period. It just does not happen.

    If you want to know about real problems go over to the Honda Odyssey page and look at the amount of transmission failures where customers are stuck with as high as $3,500.00 + bill.

    This should put into perspective the amount you pay for pads and having your rotors turned compared to replacing the transmission. This is not including the $5,000.00 to $12,000.00 you saved (or should have saved) over purchasing the Sienna or Odyssey.

    Both the Sienna and the Odyssey have there fair share of problems but unfortunately people always think the grass is greener on the other side of the hill.

    The Kia Sedona is far from being perfect but the redesign in 2006 made major improvements although, they still have their quirks just like all the manufacturers.

    It is difficult for people to get over a bad experience, probably most never will. If you look at the Honda problems there are countless people saying they will never buy another Honda but we all know, without being delusional, they do make some great products. I do hope this helps brings a little bit of the reality to the real market.

    Otherwise, one might be like the person who purchased an $27,000.00 Prius thinking he / she is getting gas mileage then the person who purchased a $14,000.00 Elantra. Delusional.
  • jimjimjjimjimj Posts: 5
    edited February 2010
    Unfortunately, its not just the 05 and under; the new models have the same rotors I believe. Have had to shave our 06's rotors down twice and then replaced onced despite having less than 30,000 miles on it.

    Before you say its our driving habits, we also have a station wagon and SUV that are 5 and 11 years old each without requiring rotor work. Read the posts, lots of owners of the new Sedona are having rotor issues; the geniuses at Kia decided to continue to cheap out on the rotors of the redesign despite problems with the older model.
  • lavrishevolavrishevo Posts: 312
    edited February 2010
    I am averaging about 18K on pads on my 06 and I live in a country, Puerto Rico, where I am stop and go all the time plus mountain driving. Of course how loaded down the van is and driving habits play a role but I agree that Kia could have done a better job with the 06+ brakes as well. I am not sure if the new models have the same rotors but there is a significant difference in weight.

    Nevertheless, I will gladly take on brake pads over the thousands I have saved in purchase price and the extended powertrain warranty. I agree Jim, Kia could have done a better job but think of what you have for the price you paid. Can't have everything...

    Just a heads up. Pepboys offers pads now with lifetime warranty and no labor cost if they have to be replaced within a year, otherwise you just pay for labor. When I replaced my pads I went with this deal and kept my cross drilled / slotted rotors. Those do help a lot in brake feel and they are not expensive.
  • It sounds like the drums are out of round.This will cause the shoes shift on the backing plate.Allso have the hardware checked,i have seen the bottom spring
    cause this concern.
  • katrogkatrog Posts: 10
    What about the spring? Could it be too loose, too tight, not hooked? Could it have been any of those ways when the car was new? Could the drums have been out of round when the car was brand new? My problems have been going on for 5 years.
  • the_hostthe_host Posts: 1
    Need some help here..... Changed front pads on my 2005 Sedona... All was good but whenever i do high speeds (80% of the time) my front brakes seize. Especially the right hand driver side ones.
    Can anyone shed some light on this??

    Thanks
  • My issues with Kia brake rotors captured in this letter to Kia:

    Dear Mr. Ahn and Kia America,

    I have discussed the above referenced case with [Kia Motors Customer Service rep] without resolution from my view. [Service rep] response to the case was that brakes (rotors) are not a warranty item and Kia Motors will therefore not cover the cost of their replacement.

    I agree that [service rep] applied the letter of your warranty. However, I am surprised that your rotors need replacing at approximately 20,000 miles due to warping / hard spots, which may have been the result of Kia Motors or Kia dealer actions. I am also surprised that Kia Motors is only concerned with two possible causes of this warping: caliper defect (which was not the case), and driver misuse. There are additional cited causes for warping rotors that I have found (some research included below): poor quality castings of rotors, and mis-tightening of the lug nuts. We have had our tires rotated at Kia dealers, who could have mis-tightened the lug nuts. Regarding driver misuse, we had a Honda Odyssey (with same driver, driving habits, and mix of local and highway driving) that we drove in steeper terrain and had no brake issues until 60,000 miles.

    I am very disappointed that Kia Motors is unwilling to actively consider all the potential reasons for the warping of the rotors on our Sedona, and participate in the expense of the repair, given that fault for either driver misuse or dealer mis-tightening of lug nuts is not possible to prove (that I am aware of). [service rep] spoke with the dealer who was willing to provide a 10% discount on the parts and labor, which I do not believe fully addresses that there is a possibility that the dealer was at fault for mis-tightening the lug nuts, nor does it address the possibility that there as a problem with the castings from Kia Motors

    [Service rep] was not willing to look at the research I had done, nor was she informed on the potential causes for rotor warping beyond the information that the dealer had told her. I would expect Kia Motors to have a depth of knowledge on all parts of their vehicle, especially a part as important as the brakes. Service rep was also not willing to have Kia Motors inspect the rotor for material defects beyond the dealer looking at the rotors, which I do not know if that level of visual inspection can determine a problem with the castings.

    I request two things from Kia Motors: consideration of all the possible causes for the rotors warping on our Sedona at approximately 20,000; a fair participation in the cost of replacement given the potential causes.

    ----

    [Information from internet research – I would be very pleased to receive copies of research that Kia Motors has available on rotor life and causes for rotor warping]

    • Rotor warpage. Variation in the thickness of the rotor or uneven spots on either rotor face will cause the brake pedal to pulsate or shudder when the brakes are applied. Flatness can be checked by placing a straight edge against both faces of the rotor. Thickness must be checked with a micrometer at six or more points around the rotor.

    • If parallelism between rotor faces exceeds OEM specs (generally about .0005 in.), or if the rotor is warped or has hard spots (which are often discolored blue or black), the rotor should be resurfaced or replaced. Hard spots that develop from overheating or uneven tightening of lug nuts can create raised areas on the surface that often extend below the surface. The metallurgical changes in the rotor often cause the hard spots to return after a few thousand miles so replacing the rotor may be the best long-term fix.

    http://www.infinitihelp.com/diy/car_care_tips/brake_rotors_problems.htm

    A brake pedal pulsation or shudder is one of the most common symptoms that indicates rotor trouble. The cause may be too much runout in a rotor and/or variation in the thickness of the rotor. Runout occurs when the rotor wobbles as it rotates. This may be due to runout in the hub, runout in the way the rotor was originally machined, rust or dirt between the rotor and hub, or uneven torquing of the lug nuts that causes distortion in the rotor and hub (which is why lug nuts should always be tightened to specifications with a torque wrench, not an impact gun).

    http://www.tomorrowstechnician.com/Article/703/the_great_rotor_debate__knowing_w- hen_to_resurface_or_replace.aspx

    Anybody who works on brakes for a living knows that rotors can cause a lot of brake problems. Uneven rotor wear (which may be due to excessive rotor runout or rotor distortion) often produces variations in thickness that can be felt as pedal pulsations when the brakes are applied. The condition usually worsens as the rotors continue to wear, eventually requiring the rotors to be resurfaced or replaced.
    Rotors can also develop hard spots that contribute to pedal pulsations and variations in thickness. Hard spots may be the result of poor quality castings or from excessive heat that causes changes in the metallurgy of the rotors. A sticky caliper or dragging brake may make the rotor run hot and increase the risk of hard spots forming. Hard spots can often be seen as discolored patches on the face of the rotor. Resurfacing the rotor is only a temporary fix because the hard spot usually extends well below the surface and usually returns as a pedal pulsation within a few thousand miles. That is why most brake experts replace rotors that have developed hard spots.
    http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/bf10312.htm

    Rotor runout can be caused by several things: variations in manufacturing tolerances, sloppy resurfacing procedures, a buildup of rust and corrosion between the rotor and hub, and uneven torque on the lug nuts.

    http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/bf110322.htm
  • My issues with Kia brake rotors captured in this letter to Kia:

    Dear Mr. Ahn and Kia America,

    I have discussed the above referenced case with [Kia Motors Customer Service rep] without resolution from my view. [Service rep] response to the case was that brakes (rotors) are not a warranty item and Kia Motors will therefore not cover the cost of their replacement.

    I agree that [service rep] applied the letter of your warranty. However, I am surprised that your rotors need replacing at approximately 20,000 miles due to warping / hard spots, which may have been the result of Kia Motors or Kia dealer actions. I am also surprised that Kia Motors is only concerned with two possible causes of this warping: caliper defect (which was not the case), and driver misuse. There are additional cited causes for warping rotors that I have found (some research included below): poor quality castings of rotors, and mis-tightening of the lug nuts. We have had our tires rotated at Kia dealers, who could have mis-tightened the lug nuts. Regarding driver misuse, we had a Honda Odyssey (with same driver, driving habits, and mix of local and highway driving) that we drove in steeper terrain and had no brake issues until 60,000 miles.

    I am very disappointed that Kia Motors is unwilling to actively consider all the potential reasons for the warping of the rotors on our Sedona, and participate in the expense of the repair, given that fault for either driver misuse or dealer mis-tightening of lug nuts is not possible to prove (that I am aware of). [service rep] spoke with the dealer who was willing to provide a 10% discount on the parts and labor, which I do not believe fully addresses that there is a possibility that the dealer was at fault for mis-tightening the lug nuts, nor does it address the possibility that there as a problem with the castings from Kia Motors

    [Service rep] was not willing to look at the research I had done, nor was she informed on the potential causes for rotor warping beyond the information that the dealer had told her. I would expect Kia Motors to have a depth of knowledge on all parts of their vehicle, especially a part as important as the brakes. Service rep was also not willing to have Kia Motors inspect the rotor for material defects beyond the dealer looking at the rotors, which I do not know if that level of visual inspection can determine a problem with the castings.

    I request two things from Kia Motors: consideration of all the possible causes for the rotors warping on our Sedona at approximately 20,000; a fair participation in the cost of replacement given the potential causes.

    ----

    [Information from internet research – I would be very pleased to receive copies of research that Kia Motors has available on rotor life and causes for rotor warping]

    • Rotor warpage. Variation in the thickness of the rotor or uneven spots on either rotor face will cause the brake pedal to pulsate or shudder when the brakes are applied. Flatness can be checked by placing a straight edge against both faces of the rotor. Thickness must be checked with a micrometer at six or more points around the rotor.

    • If parallelism between rotor faces exceeds OEM specs (generally about .0005 in.), or if the rotor is warped or has hard spots (which are often discolored blue or black), the rotor should be resurfaced or replaced. Hard spots that develop from overheating or uneven tightening of lug nuts can create raised areas on the surface that often extend below the surface. The metallurgical changes in the rotor often cause the hard spots to return after a few thousand miles so replacing the rotor may be the best long-term fix.

    http://www.infinitihelp.com/diy/car_care_tips/brake_rotors_problems.htm

    A brake pedal pulsation or shudder is one of the most common symptoms that indicates rotor trouble. The cause may be too much runout in a rotor and/or variation in the thickness of the rotor. Runout occurs when the rotor wobbles as it rotates. This may be due to runout in the hub, runout in the way the rotor was originally machined, rust or dirt between the rotor and hub, or uneven torquing of the lug nuts that causes distortion in the rotor and hub (which is why lug nuts should always be tightened to specifications with a torque wrench, not an impact gun).

    http://www.tomorrowstechnician.com/Article/703/the_great_rotor_debate__knowing_w- - hen_to_resurface_or_replace.aspx

    Anybody who works on brakes for a living knows that rotors can cause a lot of brake problems. Uneven rotor wear (which may be due to excessive rotor runout or rotor distortion) often produces variations in thickness that can be felt as pedal pulsations when the brakes are applied. The condition usually worsens as the rotors continue to wear, eventually requiring the rotors to be resurfaced or replaced.
    Rotors can also develop hard spots that contribute to pedal pulsations and variations in thickness. Hard spots may be the result of poor quality castings or from excessive heat that causes changes in the metallurgy of the rotors. A sticky caliper or dragging brake may make the rotor run hot and increase the risk of hard spots forming. Hard spots can often be seen as discolored patches on the face of the rotor. Resurfacing the rotor is only a temporary fix because the hard spot usually extends well below the surface and usually returns as a pedal pulsation within a few thousand miles. That is why most brake experts replace rotors that have developed hard spots.
    http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/bf10312.htm

    Rotor runout can be caused by several things: variations in manufacturing tolerances, sloppy resurfacing procedures, a buildup of rust and corrosion between the rotor and hub, and uneven torque on the lug nuts.

    http://www.aa1car.com/library/2003/bf110322.htm
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