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Best Car for a new teenage driver

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  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,504
    Well, the car does have crumple zones and side guard door beams. And I'll trade a bit of rollover "protection" for the ability to have virtually unimpeded 360 degree visibility. An SRS is a good secondary mode of protection, but the US systems are primarily designed to protect the imbeciles who don't wear their seatbelts(an unwarranted interference with the Law of Natural Selection).

    The only downside is that my wife tries to tempt my son to take her X3 so she can drive the '02, but he rarely falls for her schemes.

    One final thing; if you happen to check out the BMW 2002 FAQ you'll find it has over 9000 registered members- and 100-200 members and guests are usually online at any given moment. Our fondness for the 2002 hasn't resulted in our extinction so far...

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,738
    Air bags, side impact strengtheners, improved rollover protection, crumple zones...

    Air bags - no

    Excellent seat belts - yes. (zero play/has to be adjusted to each driver - designed more like a racing harness than a typical retractable design)

    Side impact protection - yes.

    Crumple Zones - yes.

    Rollover protection - well, the center of gravity is so low that if you roll it, you'll be among the few dozen other than rally racers in the 70s and people who are doing similar kinds of stupid activities. (cool as it is, rally racing *is* blatantly insane)

    If it matters that much, put a roll bar in the thing. It'll look cooler as well. ;)

    Some older cars are plenty safe, even by today's standards. Not all of them, to be sure, but Mercedes, Volvo, and BMW always put safety as a priority, even then.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,348
    Back on the Ody - my SIL has an 04 Ody with over 240K on it. No transmission issue.

    I've had two. One did have a tranny go but Honda paid for the whole thing and had me in a laoner for the two days to fix it. I just traded on the second one at 94K and no issues and got a Solara convertible. Not at all a comparable vehicle but it's November 14 and I had the top down today in Jersey. Sweet.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,235
    And I'll trade a bit of rollover "protection" for the ability to have virtually unimpeded 360 degree visibility.

    Again, my point is about protection when the car is in an accident, not accident avoidance. I give your son the nod that with the added training he'll be an aware driver, probably above average, and has less chance of being the cause of an accident. But that counts for little should someone else be the cause.

    An SRS is a good secondary mode of protection, but the US systems are primarily designed to protect the imbeciles who don't wear their seatbelts

    Umm, no. They're designed to supplement seat belts, not act in their place. That's why they're called a Supplemental Restraint System.
  • plektoplekto Posts: 3,738
    Federal laws mandate that they be strong enough to act as a primary restraint since not all 50 states had mandatory seat belt laws when they were first required in passenger vehicles (1993 or so, IIRC)

    As such, they are often far too powerful and cause needless injures where a seat belt alone would not. In essence, as they are in the U.S., they are really only offering any improved protection at highway speeds, since seat belts do more than enough without the airbags at city speeds.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,235
    If New Hampshire would step up & pass a mandatory seat belt law (it apparently still doesn't have one except for minors) then perhaps we could move towards the Euro standard, which does assume the occupants are belted.

    We'll have to agree to disagree WRT whether they're useful at low speeds. My mother-in-law is coming up on her second anniversary of broken ribs that won't heal after she was in a relatively low speed (~35MPH) collision during which the air bags did not deploy. She was belted but suffered the broken ribs & many other minor injuries + some major bruising. An airbag would have kept her from hitting her head on the dash & possibly downgraded the rib injury to severe bruising.

    I've just known too many people who've been in accidents. It's colored my opinion, but basically the more safety stuff I can get in a car the better.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,504
    As such, they are often far too powerful and cause needless injures where a seat belt alone would not. In essence, as they are in the U.S., they are really only offering any improved protection at highway speeds, since seat belts do more than enough without the airbags at city speeds.

    Exactly.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • I would have to agree with the cars that you've recommended. But it has come to my attention that you said "No Civics or Integras, insurance is to insane".

    I don't think that a Honda Civic would be expensive for insurance. The Civic isn't even considered a sports car. It has a 4cyl. 1.6L engine which only outputs 127 hp which isn't that much (1998). Back a few years ago, my sister drove a stock 1995 Civic HX hatchback. She was under my mom's insurance and my mom never complained about it being expensive. For it's size and practicality, I don't understand why the insurance would be that high, UNLESS the car has massive after market engine upgrades. Other than that, insurance for a civic shouldn't be expensive
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,702
    edited November 2012
    The key factor is "Under my mom's insurance". It was insured as if your mom was driving it, not your sister.
    Funny, you were replying to a post from 2006, and I guess so was I. :surprise:
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,348
    OK, I'll play back to the future.....

    I can tell you that under the folks' insurance or not it's tough to insure a young driver. It costs me nearly twice to insure my daughters' cars than mine and my wife's. And that's when our cars have collision while the kids do not (both old miled up cars).

    At least in another 14 months my oldest turns 25 and her rate will plummet. Maybe not long after that she'll marry her boyfriend and my insurance costs for taht car drop to zero.
  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,702
    You are saying the cars the kid's drive are in their name or not?
    Our kids don't own any cars, they just drive them.
  • fezofezo Posts: 9,348
    No, they're in my name but you need a primary driver on each car and until you have more car than drivers you have to assign individuals as primary driver of each car. If I get one more car I can be the primary driver on that, too, and it would be cheap to insure (as much as car insurance is ever cheap).
  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 28,747
    Yeah... we have four cars for three drivers... The one that my 18-yr-old is listed on is about $1100 per year... A similar car that is just "extra" is only $360.....

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  • fezofezo Posts: 9,348
    What do you insure $500 worth of liability? Our adult cars are about that. The kids are over $2K. Total bill is around $5K!
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,504
    We have a 17 year-old and no one in the family has an at-fault accident or a ticket; we pay $4300 annually for five cars.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • kyfdxkyfdx Posts: 28,747
    Full coverage on all with $500 deductible

    250K/500K/100K on liability...

    2011 Infiniti
    2006 BMW

    and two old cars (each with a value of around $3500)..

    Two adults and an 18-year old male..

    About $3000 - $3100 total premium per year..

    It is pretty cheap, but my homeowner's insurance is up over $1400/yr, now.. :(

    MODERATOR
    Prices Paid, Lease Questions, SUVs

  • fezofezo Posts: 9,348
    Well, I pay half your homeowner insurance so we're almost getting even here....
  • igozoomzoomigozoomzoom Waleska, GeorgiaPosts: 791
    edited November 2012
    A fairly recent trend in the insurance industry is REQUIRING a teen driver to be listed as primary driver on a vehicle, regardless of whether they actually are primary! For example, a married couple has a 2010 Infiniti G37 and 2012 Honda Pilot. Their 16-year old son only drives one of the vehicles on Saturday and Sunday to a part-time job, no more than 25 miles each week. But the insurance company will require the son to be primary on one of the vehicles and that car will be rated accordingly (premium will triple in most cases)!

    Prohibitively expensive insurance cost is one of the main reasons many teens aren't getting licensed until they graduate high school. I'm an independent insurance agent and I have definitely seen a decrease in teen drivers being added to policies over the last five years. Of course, some parents simply aren't telling their insurance company about their teen drivers! That's a very risky gamble, of course. If the teen has an accident, the insurer can choose whether to pay or, what I see most often, they will only pay the other (not-at-fault) driver's damages. When the insurance company discovers an unreported teen driver (because of a claim or any other source), they have the legal right to bill you retroactively to when the teen started driving! The retroactive billing is usually accompanied by a cancellation notice, which will make it more difficult and more expensive to find a new insurer.

    It's bad enough for the parents of a teenage girl, but the cost is BRUTAL for a teenage boy! I routinely see the entire policy premium increase by 250% when a 16-year old male driver is added!!! It's more like 170-180% to add a 16-year old female...

    Recently, I had a couple that I've known for years call me because their 17-year old son was getting his license and a cheap vehicle of his own. The increase to add him and liability-only coverage on a $5000 car was going to increase their premium by $3350 per year with their current insurer. I told them that it would be a bit less expensive (possibly $500-$800/year less) if they waited until he turned 18. Then they confided that the reason their son needed a car was because he had to get a job because his girlfriend was pregnant. They also said that the he and the girlfriend would be getting married before the baby was born. When I quoted their policy, if the son was married it would save $1400/year! The following Saturday, the teenager parents-to-be got married.

    That story is sad on a couple of levels, but I haven't seen an epidemic of teenagers getting married just to reduce insurance premiums....yet!
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 40,575
    A reporter would like to talk to someone under the age of 30 who bought a car within the last few months. Please reach out to pr@edmunds.com by Wednesday, March 20, 2013 if you'd like to help.

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