Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Isuzu Axiom Maintenance and Repair

1246713

Comments

  • Hope you like your Axiom - it's a unique and cool vehicle, in spite of all its flaws. Mine sold new for about $25K. I have an 02 2WD Axiom and the workshop (service) manual. There is no cabin filter whatsoever. Outside air feeds directly into the blower motor according to the chapter on the HVAC system.

    Odd that there is no filter, considering it is made in the same plant as the Subarus in Indiana, yet the subarus have replacement cabin filters. So, you may want to get one of those canopys from King Canopy (which is what i have) to keep out the leaves, dust and debris. Living in Florida, I have never even had a mold problem with my Axiom, and I would notice it, too, as I am highly allergic to mold. So, if you keep it under a roof or cover, it should not be a problem for you.

    URL: http://www.kingcanopy.com/product/c1020pcs

    (I got mine at Sams Club for much less than this price.)
  • 3h1ax023h1ax02 Posts: 4
    How often should the transmission fluid be changed in an 02 Axiom. I cannot believe you can go 120K miles without changing the fluid as the owners manual calls for. Thanks for any replys.
  • Based on the high number of problems with transmission FAILURES reported by owners on this year model (which I also own and personally had trouble with myself), I would recommend that you change the fluid at 50K miles. Since there is no easily accessible fill port, you will likely need to get this done by your local ASE certified mechanic. Also, I paid extra for synthetic tranny fluid and recommend you do, too, since this tran is failure prone.

    But, equally important is the little seal on the side of the tranny. There is a device called a modulator on the side of the transmission and the seal on the modulator is very prone to failure. Mine made a thunking noise, and the seal "popped" at 42K miles, right in the middle of DisneyWorld in Orlando, (literally), and during peak exit time traffic. The effects were immediately noticable, as the tranny began to shudder and shift really hard. Pulled over a, spotted the leak, and then we limped home (remember - there is no way to fill the fluid on this model). Should've had it towed instead, but there was no long term damage that I can tell, and the repair was covered by warranty. Now at 92K miles on synth. fluid which I changed at 70K, and will do it again around 105K.

    Moral of this story is to check that modulator seal regularly and change fluid often - it's the best money you can spend on your car and the best prevention against tranny failure (other than not hotrodding the vehicle).

    Hope that helps.
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    How in the world did you wind up with any 2002 vehicle with just 28K??

    Let us know why the miles are soooo low please.

    Regards
    Bert
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    I think your advice on changing tranny fluid is sound and going over 60K is just asking for trouble. If you can afford the extra $$'s synthetic is always the way to go. Pay now or pay later is good advice for justifying the expense of synthetic. I run a 2 cylinder welder on synthetic only and its more than 30 years old and still runs like new.

    Now on the 4L30 transmission; With the exception of the side accumulator seal failures I think this transmission is probably the most robust part of this crappy car and is a reliable transmission used by many high end car vendors. Granted the accumulator seal failure is a failure but it's a simple one to fix. I think the biggest problem is that it leaks while you are driving so you never see an oil stain for a warning. Couple that with no trans dipstick and it's a setup for failure.

    Regards
    Bert
  • decababydecababy Posts: 5
    My reduced power light has come on along with the check engine light and when it happened the car wouldn't go more than 35miles per hour. I took it to a parts store and various codes showed up po401, p11125,p1295,p1515,p0300 any help with finding these codes would help. thanks.
  • 3h1ax023h1ax02 Posts: 4
    To answer low miles question by bertbcfm. I have 3 hondas plus the 02 axiom with 1 driver in family. Thanks Joe
  • cptsessocptsesso Posts: 116
    I think 50k is even too long. It was suggested by an ex-Isuzu mechanic to do a fluid change every 30k and at the 60k interval add in changing the transmission filter. I definitely have no faith in the 120k fluid change. That is way too long.
  • 3h1ax023h1ax02 Posts: 4
    Where is the transmission filter located on the 2002 axiom? Thanks Joe
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    I found these so far:

    The codes in question and the definitions are:
    P1125 Isuzu Electronic Throttle Control Limit Performance Mode
    P1221 Isuzu Throttle Position Sensor 1-2 Circuit Performance
    P1295 Isuzu Electronic Throttle Control Power Management Mode
    P1515 Isuzu TP Sensor To MAF Sensor
    Correlation

    Still looking for a Isuzu Master List.

    Regards
    Bert
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    Formating is weird but this is the best I can do so far. Anyone else out there have a better Isuzu specific list?? Even some of these descriptions need an interpretation.

    Bert

    Code Description
    P1106 MAP Circuit Intermittent Voltage High
    P1107
    MAP Circuit Intermittent Voltage Low
    P1108
    Barometric Pressure Circuit Input High
    P1111
    IAT Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage High
    P1112
    IAT Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage Low
    P1114
    ECT Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage Low
    P1115
    ECT Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage High
    P1121
    TP Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage High
    P1122
    TP Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage Low
    P1133
    H02S Insufficient Switching Bank 1 Sensor 1
    P1134
    H02S Transition Time Ratio Bank 1 Sensor 1
    P1153
    H02S Insufficient Switching Bank 2 Sensor 1
    P1154
    H02S Transition Time Ratio Bank 2 Sensor 1
    P1171
    Fuel System Lean During Acceleration
    P1297
    Electrical Load Detector Circuit Input Low
    P1298
    Electrical Load Detector Circuit Input High
    P1300
    Random Misfire
    P1336
    CKP System Variation Not Learned
    P1359
    CKP/TDC Sensor Disconnected
    P1361
    TDC Sensor Intermittent Interruption
    P1362
    TDC Sensor No Signal
    P1380
    ABS Rough Road System Fault
    P1381
    Cylinder Position Sensor Intermittent Interruption, Misfire Detected (Except 1998 Rodeo)
    P1381
    ABS Rough Road Class 2 Serial Data Fault Or Link Error (1998 Rodeo)
    P1382
    Cylinder Position Sensor No Signal
    P1390
    G Sensor Circuit Intermittent Voltage Low
    P1391
    G Sensor Performance
    P1392
    G Sensor Voltage Low
    P1393
    G Sensor Voltage High
    P1394
    G Sensor Intermittent Voltage High
    P1404
    EGR Valve Stuck Closed
    P1406
    EGR Valve Pintle Position Circuit
    P1441
    EVAP System Flow During Non-Purge
    P1442
    EVAP Vacuum Switch Voltage High During Ignition On
    P1459
    EVAP Emission Purge Flow Switch Malfunction
    P1491
    EGR Valve Lift Insufficient Detected
    P1498
    EGR Valve Lift Sensor Voltage High
    P1508
    IAC System RPM Low
    P1509
    IAC System RPM High
    P1546
    A/C Compressor Clutch Output Circuit Malfunction
    P1548
    A/C Compressor Clutch Output Circuit Malfunction
    P1607
    PCM Internal Circuit Failure ‘‘A’’
    P1618
    SPI Communications Error
    P1625
    PCM Unexpected Reset
    P1627
    PCM A/D Conversion Malfunction
    P1635
    5 Volt Reference Voltage Circuit Malfunction
    P1640
    ODM 1 Input Voltage High (Except 1998 Rodeo)
    P1640
    ODM Output ‘‘A’’ Circuit Fault (1998 Rodeo)
    P1650
    Quad Driver Module ‘‘A’’ Fault
    P1790
    Trans ROM Checksum Error
    P1792
    Trans EEPROM Checksum Error
    P1835
    Trans Kickdown Switch Malfunction
    P1850
    Brake Band Apply Solenoid Malfunction
    P1860
    TCC PWM Solenoid Circuit Failure
    P1870
    Transmission Component Slipping
  • prsaxiomprsaxiom Posts: 1
    i need a diagram for the replacement of a serpentine belt on my 2002 isuzu axiom, can you help me out? THANK YOU!!
  • I have the service manual (workshop manual) for the O2 Axiom in PDF format. Found the exact page you need (pg. 836). The diagram is in the lower left hand corner of that page.

    Saved this page as a one page PDF and loaded it up to our company's website, in the PDF Docs folder. PLEASE DOWNLOAD IT IN THE NEXT 24 HOURS - it will be deleted after that.

    And, check out our great deals on specialty vitamin supplements while you are there!

    Here is the info you seek:

    ************

    http://www.vivagen.net/pdf_docs/2002_Isuzu_SerpentineBelt.pdf

    link title

    *************
    Hope that helps. The serpentine belt is actually pretty easy to change out, once you have the diagram and figure out how the tensioner works. You can basically pop it on by hand if you get the tension off of it. Usually takes two people and a bright light, but no special tools. The guys at Jiffy Lube took mine off, couldn't find one that fit it, and then FORGOT how to get it back on! I had to get one myself from Autozone and do it myself, which saved me at least $30.

    Good luck!
  • Sure am getting my money's worth out of the Workshop (Service) manual for my Axiom, especially considering it cost about $20 online. Near the beginning of the service manual is this entry, which will really blow your mind, when it comes to the frequency of serving the automatic transmission fluid in an 02 Axiom. This is the literal quote, which I scraped off page 0B-7 in the Maintenance and Lubrication section:

    "Automatic Transmission Fluid Replacement

    Under harsh operating conditions, such as constant
    driving in heavy city traffic during hot weather, or in hilly or
    mountainous terrain, change the transmission fluid and
    service the sump filter after every 20,000 miles (32,000
    km) of operation.

    More over, the remaining life percentage of ATF can be
    estimated by using TECH–II as an auxiliary tool to judge
    the right time for ATF replacement.

    The remaining life percentage is calculated from ATF’S
    heat history. When it is close to 0%, ATF replacement is
    recommended."

    However, if you look at the chart printed on page 0B-2 it says to change the automatic transmission fluid at 120,000 miles. And, this is the same chart found in the owners manual in the glovebox. So, there is a definite contradiction here, especially considering that changing the AT fluid is a tricky task best left to the dealer or someone with a tranny fluid exchange machine.
  • Lots of trouble codes there, many of which are somewhat related. Has a rat chewed through your wiring harness??

    Sounds like you have shorted your wiring harness, or have a bad wiring harness or a loose connector at the PCM module. A even more worst case scenario is a bad PCM module, which would be expensive, but hopefully is UNLIKELY.

    Here are some details from the service manual, although there is a lot more info than I can post, but this may get you started:

    **************************
    Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0401 EGR Flow Insufficient

    Diagnostic Aids
    Check for the following conditions:
    *Poor connection or damaged harness – Inspect the
    wiring harness for damage. If the harness appears to
    be OK, observe the Actual EGR Position display on the
    Tech 2 while moving connectors and wiring harnesses
    related to the EGR valve. A change in the display will
    indicate the location of the fault.
    *Ensure EGR valve is correctly mounted. See
    On-Vehicle Service.

    Reviewing the Failure Records vehicle mileage since the
    diagnostic test last failed may help determine how often
    the condition that caused the DTC to be set occurs. This
    may assist in diagnosing the condition.

    NOTE: If the EGR valve shows signs of excessive heat,
    check the exhaust system for blockage (possibly a
    plugged catalytic converter) using the “Restricted
    Exhaust System Check”.

    ************************************

    P1125 ETC (Electric Throttle Control) Limit Performance Mode

    Diagnostic Aids
    An intermittent may be caused by the following:
    * Poor connections.
    *Mis routed harness.
    6E–402 6VE1 3.5L ENGINE DRIVEABILITY AND EMISSIONS
    * Rubbed through wire insulation.
    * Broken wire inside the insulation.
    Check for the following conditions:
    * Poor connection at PCM-Inspect harness connectors
    for backed out terminals, improper mating, broken
    locks, improperly formed or damaged terminals, and
    poor terminal to wire connection.
    *Damaged harness-Inspect the wiring harness for
    damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the
    AP sensor 1, AP sensor 2, AP sensor 3 display on the
    Tech 2 while moving connectors and wiring harnesses
    related to the sensor.
    A change in the display will indicate the location of
    the fault.
    If DTC P1125 cannot be duplicated, the information
    included in the Failure Records data can be useful in
    determined vehicle mileage since the DTC was last
    set.
    If it is determined that the DTC occurs intermittently,
    performing the DTC P1125 Diagnostic Chart may
    isolate the cause of the fault.
    DTC P1125

    **********************************************************

    Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P1295 ETC Power Management Mode

    Diagnostic Aids
    An intermittent may be caused by the following:
    * Poor connections.
    * Misrouted harness.
    * Rubbed through wire insulation.
    * Broken wire inside the insulation.
    Check for the following conditions:
    * Poor connection at PCM-Inspect harness connectors
    for backed out terminals, improper mating, broken
    6E–452 6VE1 3.5L ENGINE DRIVEABILITY AND EMISSIONS
    locks, improperly formed or damaged terminals, and
    poor terminal to wire connection.
    * Damaged harness-Inspect the wiring harness for
    damage. If the harness appears to be OK, observe the
    TP sensor 1, TP sensor 2 display on the Tech 2 while
    moving connectors and wiring harnesses related to the
    sensor.
    A change in the display will indicate the location of
    the fault. If DTC P1295 cannot be duplicated, the
    information included in the Failure Records data can
    be useful in determined vehicle mileage since the
    DTC was last set.
    If it is determining that the DTC occurs intermittently,
    performing the DTC
    P1295 Diagnostic Chart may isolate the cause of the
    fault.
  • decababydecababy Posts: 5
    Thanks for all the help so far I will be taking this info to the mechanic and I will be checking back for more info.
  • cptsessocptsesso Posts: 116
    Ya, I think that is why I was told every 30k is a safe bet. I am curious what the change interval is for some of the other vehicles which use the 4L30E trans?
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,966
    There are ways to convert a pdf image to a jpg, and then you could post that page in your CarSpace album.

    Otherwise, some new owner is going to pop in here in two years trying to track it down again. Or maybe in two weeks. :)

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • Dear 3h1ax02:

    According to the Workshop manual for the 02 Axiom, the transmission oil filter is located in the main transmission pan, which is located on the bottom of the transmission. There is also a magnet in this pan, near the filter. The filter is an odd shape, designed to fit in the pan. To get to the filter, you have to drain the fluid, and remove the pan and gasket.

    The drain plug (screw) is the larger one in the middle of the bottom of the pan. The fill screw (actually called the overfill screw) is located nearby, adjacent to the drain plug (screw). Believe it or not, you FILL the transmission through this overfill screw, until fluid comes out the overfill screw. HOW you do that I do not know, but I assume you need a special tool or hand pump at a minimum. The manual says this:

    "Remove the transmission overfill screw (1) and fill
    transmission through overfill screw opening, using
    DEXRON)–III ATF.
    NOTE: Add transmission fluid until it flows out over the
    overfill screw opening.
    5. Let engine idle until a fluid temperature between 32 deg C
    (90 deg F) and 57deg C (135deg F) is reached.
    6. Add transmission fluid until it flows out over the overfill
    screw opening, then close the overfill screw."

    It leaves out the step where you wipe the transmission fluid out of your eyes, nose and mouth, after getting it all over you!

    It does include this handy note, about plug gaskets for BOTH screw plugs:

    "NOTE: To prevent fluid leaks, the overfill screw and oil drain screws gasket must be replaced each time these screws are removed."

    This is likely a dealer-supplied item, which should be purchased along with the filter and pan gasket.

    Hope that helps.
  • shamwowshamwow Posts: 1
    My immobilizer light has come on twice in the past two months and when it does, my car starts but there is no acceleration. I also have noticed that my light on the key is getting dim. Do these two have any correlation?
  • Are you the ShamWow guy for real? I just loathe your commercials...

    But, to your question, there is no such thing as an "Immobilizer light" on an Axiom, and in fact the word does not appear in the Service Manual anywhere. You must be referring to one of the other warning lights. If you can be more precise, Shamwow, I can look up the answer in the service manual and get back to you, but only if you promise to send me a full set of Shamwows for free (no just kidding).

    Back to you...
  • steverstever Viva Las CrucesPosts: 41,966
    ShamWow? Dub Schwartz prefers a StickMop. :P

    Now back to your regularly scheduled program.

    Moderator
    Minivan fan. Feel free to message or email me - stever@edmunds.com.

  • :confuse: My axiom needs the bank 1 &2 o2 sensors replaced. A mechanic quoted me $600-700.00 which seems steep to me considering the parts are 53.00 at an auto parts store. How difficult are these sensors to replace and where can I go to see a "how to" diagram online?
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    They are not too hard to replace. Just make sure you get the exact right ones. Take them off with a deep wall socket or closed (box) end wrench. They can be hard to remove. A couple days of penetrating fluid wouldn't hurt. Do not use any silicone anything on the threads. Look back through the messages and got to the myisuzu site and you will see a picture as to where they are located. Let us know how it goes.

    Bert
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    That Is:

    http://www.myisuzuparts.com/vin_menu.php

    to see the 02 sensor locations

    Bert
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    It couldn't be that all of our wonderful Axioms are running like tops is it????

    Gas gauge sender is shot and I'm cruising on the odometer and the MPG readout. Don't even want to think about pulling the tank and all of the hoses just to be convenienced by a working gas gauge.

    Owning an Axion is helped by lowering your mechanical standards.

    Bert
  • shogrenshogren Posts: 15
    I cannot find the message about getting rid of the active shocks. Would appreciate any help . Is there any negatives for removing active shocks.Thanks
  • bertbcfmbertbcfm Posts: 71
    I think it all starts on page 5, message #42. Go there and just start reading through the messages. Several people have successfully replaced the electronic shocks with regular shocks at great savings and much improved ride. I'm one of them. The only down side is that it is somewhat difficult to remove the original shocks. If you want have a trusted garage do it or if you have access to a lift it's not too bad. Look at the later shock messages, there are part numbers to order by.

    Regards
    Bert --- no damn gas gauge
  • Bert was the first to report on this, but when I followed suit, I detailed the process in 10 steps on page 7 message 61. I switched to Monroe Sensatrac shocks, after consulting with their support group.

    You can disconnect the electronics yourself (which I recommend, as it is pretty easy to do) and then just have Sears or your Monroe dealer swap out the shocks for around $250 or less (which I do not recommend that you do yourself - it was very difficult to get off the old shocks as Bert describes. Not the front ones - the back ones. Two husky guys could hardly get the shocks unthreaded, and it is a job best left to a mechanic with the proper tools who changes out shocks for a living!).

    Sure do not miss the "sproingy, sproingy" ride from my old electronic suspension.
  • They were as easy to replace as a spark plug for me. I got mine at Autozone, who also checked the codes for me. I did not have to use any kind of nutbuster fluid on mine, but it is possible you'll need to, if they have been there for a while. If I remember the procedure correctly, I also had to unhook the battery for 20 minutes to reset the error code, since I did not have an OBD2 device.

    But, paying $700.00 for this is an outrageous ripoff of the highest magnitude.

    P.S. Stop buying cheap gas. It may be what is damaging your O2 sensors. I have had no further problems in the past few years, but I only buy gas at BP, Shell or Citgo, and avoid those low dollar places. I also add 2-3 oz of acetone to a full tank of gas every now and then to clean out the carbon deposits. STP will do the same thing.
Sign In or Register to comment.