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Customer Service: The good, the bad and the ugly!

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Comments

  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding where you're coming from, but why should the dealer pick up the tab?

    I can understand that the dealer might want to apply to some goodwill to the situation in view of the mileage, but I don't see that there's any obligation. Also, I don't believe that it can be taken for granted that the manufacturer would reimburse the dealer.

    How about if time and mileage were reversed? If you have a 3/36 and you rack up 36K in nine months, then something fails a couple of months after that, should the dealer pick up the tab also?

    Just like you agree to pay $x @ month for 36 months, at which time your obligation is paid, the manufacturer agrees to warranty the vehicle (via the dealer) for 3/36 or whatever. Once the time/mileage limit has been reached the obligation ceases.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 16,897
    I apologize in advance for the length of this ...

    I've been doing the bulk of my shopping online for well over a decade now and I have never experienced problems like I have with autopartswarehouse.com.

    Gee, where to start? Well, the descriptions on their site were incorrect. I know this because multiple items with multiple part numbers and differing prices had the same exact description. In my case, I was trying to order exhaust pieces for my Mazda. So I called up to speak to their "automotive experts." The salesfolk couldn't answer my questions, so they passed me off to their "mechanic," who, after reviewing my questions, the parts I needed, consulting with his boss, looking in his manuals, etc, claimed I should order parts X, Y, and Z and that will be everything I've requested (I requested all of the parts south of the exhaust manifold).

    I was very suspicious of this because now I had the mismatched online descriptions, mismatched diagram from the manufacturer of the exhaust parts, and mismatched advice from this guy. BUT, he repeatedly insisted this was exactly what I should do. So I did. What happened? You guessed it ... I got the parts and they were WRONG.

    Now I call up to complain and figure out what to do next. I'm then informed they didn't send me part X. Well, wait a minute, part X is part #12345, is it not? Yes, it is. Well, that part HAS been delivered, its sitting on my garage floor, and its WRONG! "no sir, we didn't send you that part." HUH??!

    OK. Forget the whole thing. You are idiots. I am returning EVERYTHING for a full refund. Oh, guess what? That can take 30-60 days!!

    I get the return authorization number and hang up. Then I start thinking about this. Is it worth it? After all, what they did send, I could use, it just wasn't everything I needed because, the gist of it is, they claimed part #12345 extended from the manifold to the midpipe but what I received was about 1/3 of that. They claim they never sent part #12345. Alright, so I come up with the brilliant plan that I will KEEP what they sent, but get a refund for what they claim to have not sent. That would leave me needing 2 more parts, which I would get from somewhere else. In the end, it would cost me about $20 more than the total they promised to me in the first place. I'll take that compromise rather than waiting 30-60 days for a refund.

    So there we go ... to make this long story shorter ... its been 30 days and they STILL have not even refunded me for the part they claim to have never sent! Why the heck they even charged me for something they never sent is the answer I can't get out of them.

    I've ordered THOUSANDS of dollars of auto parts online and 10s of thousands in other purchases over the years and NEVER had this issue. I think I can understand now why some folks don't like doing business online. If this had been my first experience, there's no way I'd every do it again.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '08 Town&Country

  • Good willing repairs can be tricky. We have good willed a couple of major repairs for people in the past. Even partialy good willed a motor in a Disco when it dropped a cylinder liner. They were only a few hundred miles over the warranty and had all of the services done by us. Land Rover picked up a little over half the bill.
  • jmonroejmonroe Pittsburgh areaPosts: 5,540
    Maybe I'm misunderstanding where you're coming from, but why should the dealer pick up the tab?

    mac24 and tiedster:

    I realize that a line has to be drawn somewhere and the warranty clearly states where that line is. No argument/question about that. However, because of the car being only 3 months over the warranty period I feel something should have been done here.

    Manufacturers and dealers are always quick to tell us how valuable we are to them, this would be a good time/way to prove it. I've had dealers pick up the tab under these circumstances years and years ago long before they touted customers being valuable to them. It seems like they say one thing now but do another.

    I even had Sears provide warranty work 5 months after the warranty ran out on a stove in 1990. Maybe they won't do that know but because they were good to me once I make it a point to shop at Sears whenever they have something that I want.

    jmonroe

    '09 Genesis V8 and '12 Legacy Limited 6 cyl

  • jmonroejmonroe Pittsburgh areaPosts: 5,540
    I've ordered THOUSANDS of dollars of auto parts online and 10s of thousands in other purchases over the years and NEVER had this issue. I think I can understand now why some folks don't like doing business online. If this had been my first experience, there's no way I'd every do it again.

    I can sympathize with you because I'd be very irate if this happened to me. However, because you have had such good success buying over the internet for so long I'm sure after you cool down (I know it's easy for me to say) you will agree that this was just an anomaly and you will continue to buy this way but not with these people.

    I'm surprised that it has taken this long for you to have had a bad experience. I can't say this and I buy things just down the street.

    Like I said I feel for ya,

    jmonroe

    '09 Genesis V8 and '12 Legacy Limited 6 cyl

  • jmonroejmonroe Pittsburgh areaPosts: 5,540
    Good willing repairs can be tricky.

    Rover,

    Sorry I just noticed that I missed your post. Not my bad, my computer is wacky. I have to blame it on something else, I'm never at fault; I learned that from my wife.

    I'm sure with the customers that you have, they can be very demanding and expect far more than the average customer.

    Does Land Rover work closer with their dealers on things like this or are they the same as all the other manufactures?

    jmonroe

    '09 Genesis V8 and '12 Legacy Limited 6 cyl

  • MAC24 has it right ... the manufacturer gives a warranty for X miles or X years. Once that warranty expires, the manufacturers' obligation expires.
    NOW, that's not to say that the dealership cannot offer goodwill. BUT, goodwill is usually reserved to those clients who have shown loyalty to the dealership. If a client is recommended services and declines and then takes it to the local guy down the street aka Down the Street Motors, that client has shown no loyalty to the dealer. That client is spending their $$ elsewhere, so why would the dealer go out of their way to help the guy that is basically a warranty mooch?
    I wouldn't have offered any assistance.
    HOWEVER, if it was a long term client, had a good relationship with the dealer and spent his/her money at the store than this would be a good candidate for Goodwill assistance.
    It is up to the individual store, the manager and the circumstances to dictate if goodwill should or can be extended.

    "beauty is in the eye of the beholder"
  • next time, order the parts from a real expert ... YOUR LOCAL MAZDA DEALER!

    NOT some idiot looking in a catalog.

    Even better, stop in to said local dealer and start making friends with the parts guy. Order some little parts and tip said parts guy. Keep up relationship with said parts guy and in no time, said parts guy MIGHT give you discounts. Discounts that might be close to wholesale/bodyshop prices.
    You never know until you try.

    And besides, said parts guy SHOULD be expert in Mazda parts.
  • user777user777 Posts: 3,341
    yes, but it's also the responsibility of a good service department to establish and maintain loyalty...

    in your work, how do you exceed expectations?
  • jmonroejmonroe Pittsburgh areaPosts: 5,540
    BUT, goodwill is usually reserved to those clients who have shown loyalty to the dealership. If a client is recommended services and declines and then takes it to the local guy down the street aka Down the Street Motors, that client has shown no loyalty to the dealer. That client is spending their $$ elsewhere, so why would the dealer go out of their way to help the guy that is basically a warranty mooch?

    I'm sorry but I don't know what you are saying here.

    What recommended services were offered and declined by the guy I was talking about in post 229?

    BTW, since you mentioned it, this is the second car that this guy said he has purchased from this dealer and I remember him saying that he recommended this dealer to his neighbor who bought a car from this dealer. So much for this "dealer loyalty" thing.

    You lost me,

    jmonroe

    '09 Genesis V8 and '12 Legacy Limited 6 cyl

  • jmonroejmonroe Pittsburgh areaPosts: 5,540
    Order some little parts and tip said parts guy.

    Yeah, I guess a 'little something under the table' goes a long way in some businesses.

    If some one ever tried to 'tip' me for doing my job I wouldn't have accepted it and would have been highly insulted.

    Different businesses, different ways of of doing business.

    jmonroe

    '09 Genesis V8 and '12 Legacy Limited 6 cyl

  • lemkolemko Posts: 15,071
    Holy smoke! That sounds like the same thing that happened to my girlfriend many years ago with her 1991 Mercury Tracer. She took it in for the "diagnostic check" and they removed and disassembled the tranny and said they couldn't put it back in for less than $400. Rather than let Cottman touch the car, she sent a tow truck to pick it and they and took it to my friend's transmission shop. He put it back together and in the car for $125. No problems. Girlfriend learned a somewhat costly lesson about Cottman.
  • jlawrence01jlawrence01 Posts: 1,828
    Girlfriend learned a somewhat costly lesson about Cottman.

    My transmission guy - who owns a Cottman franchise - does most of the transmission work for several Ford dealerships. And he does a better job!

    Like all the chains, it depends on the franchisee.
  • Once the time/mileage limit has been reached the obligation ceases.

    True, and I agree, but there can be repurcussions.

    I took my Sentra into the Nisaan dealer because the washer nozzles quit working. The tech took them apart and some of the internal plastic had cracked. I would be 40 bucks to fix them. I asked the service manager to cover it under warranty, he checked and said, "No, by your inservice date, the car is two weeks out of warranty." I told him I waited two months to bring the car in at the same time as my next scheduled maintenance, since it wasn't a major problem during the summer, and the mileage was undr warranty. He said, "If it is out of warranty, it is out of warranty, even though you only have 30K miles on it."

    Well, he was right. But I'll be danged if I'll ever buy another Nissan. I was going to him, 50 miles away, because the local guys are horrible.

    So basically, Nissan lost a potential sale or two in the future for 40 bucks. Good call.

    Turboshadow
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    So basically, Nissan lost a potential sale or two in the future for 40 bucks. Good call.

    Sure, I agree that a gesture of goodwill can be worth a lot on both sides. However, the original post was written as though there was duty by the dealer to pick up a warranty claim after the time period of the warranty had expired.......not so.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 16,897
    oh, of course, like i said, if it WAS my first online experience, it would be my last. Since I have had such good success, I will continue doing business this way, just not with these folks.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '08 Town&Country

  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 16,897
    next time, order the parts from a real expert ... YOUR LOCAL MAZDA DEALER!

    hahahaaha!

    man, you must have money to burn! lol.

    I'm just teasing you. But, seriously, I save a fortune buying online rather than, of all places, the dealer! In this exhaust instance, I even saved $700 over midas (or was it meineke, i always get them confused), who would have made some of their own pieces to "save me money."

    I can get discounted parts through my father's business, but I still do can often do better online. After this, though, I will use him rather than an online place I am unfamiliar with.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '08 Town&Country

  • But, seriously, I save a fortune buying online rather than, of all places, the dealer!

    I wonder if that's a Mazda thing. A buddy of mine hasan RX7 vert and a second generation Probe GT. He buys everything for them over the net because he swears the Mazda parts are too high. He bought some oil cooler hoses on the net for 30 bucks that he said Mazda charged over 300 dollars for. He's a straight shooter, so I have no reason to doubt what he says.

    Turboshadow
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 16,897
    oh, definitely not just a mazda thing. I also saved a fortune during the time I owned my Volvo, Honda, Jeep, Benz, Toyota, etc. I thought everyone knew that buying parts from the dealership means you are automatically paying more? Granted, there are some parts that you can only find through a dealership, but those are fairly rare occurences.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '08 Town&Country

  • Many years ago Land Rover of North America, well it was actually called Range Rover of North America back then, was much more lienent concerning goodwill. You could be months and thousands of miles out of warranty and they would still cover repairs. The factory warranty was I think three years and 40,000 miles back then but in reality it was closer to three and a half years and 45,000 miles.

    That all changed when Land Rover was purchased by BMW around 1994.

    Our regional service rep is pretty good when it comes to helping us out on stuff like this. When a fuel pump locked up on a SC First Edition Range Rover Sport just a couple of weeks after delivery and there were none in the country and the part was back ordered for months he helped us out. He found one some where in England, probably had it ripped out of a car on the production line, and then had it shipped overnight to the East coast.

    In that same line though when a customer had a problem with the crankshaft of his 2002 Range Rover and he was a couple of months out of warranty he denied the good will claim. The guy had never had the Range Rover serviced at our Land Rover dealership or any other Land Rover dealership. He had only been in for warranty work, mostly minor warranty work when compared to most other 2002 Range Rovers, and the service history he provided from the independent shop he had used was incomplete.

    If he had a complete service history or had been servicing the vehicle at a Land Rover dealership then LRNA would have picked up half the cost of the repair.
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