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Honda Fit Transmission Questions

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Comments

  • navionnavion Posts: 1
    I think that Honda is missing the boat by not offering the marvelous and proven CVT transmission in the US market. Also it would be nice to have the cruise control option without having to go to the sport model which does not appeal to me as I am more interested in practicality.
  • i absolutely agree. i am really excited about the car but don't particularly want any of the "extras" EXCEPT the cruise control, which, in my mind, is a must. is there an after-market cruise control solution?
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    I would have to disagree on the CVT. Having lived with a Mini with the CVT, the jury's still out on its efficiency merits, and I think CVT has issues with low-speed drivability. Maybe it is a better partner for a high-power, high-torque engine...
  • honda411honda411 Posts: 2
    There absolutely is an aftermarket solution. Most dealers have companies that come in and do custom leather and sunroof installs. These same companies can offer a cruise system by Audiovox which works well. Installed price listed for a little under $280. American Radio is who I recommend in the Atlanta area.
  • The Fit has plenty of power for me. I drive a 250 hp oddy and the fit gets off the line and up to speed with much less drama. The AT is better than the 5AT on the van, and seems to spin the motor just a little faster at 60.

    My brother in law, tries out the paddle shifters. I guess he doesn't really understand the concept of shifting. He grabs at the downshift, drops it down to first doing 45mph, I think the motor spun about 4-5K, didn't even put up a fuss, couldn't hardly hear it.
  • raychuang00raychuang00 Posts: 541
    The AT is better than the 5AT on the van, and seems to spin the motor just a little faster at 60.

    I think that's because 5AT on the Fit is very closely related to the 5AT unit on the 2006 Civic, one that has torque converter lockup at all gears; that feature is not commonly found in automatic tranmisssions from European cars! :surprise:
  • cecirdrcecirdr Posts: 9
    Could you explain what torque converter lockup is? I was wanting the manual transmission, but am now second guessing since it runs at higher rpms at interstate speeds. I need to do a good bit of highway miles and want a quieter ride. Plus...if it's revving higher than the auto, how does it get better gas mileage on the highway?

    Thanks.
  • claudius753claudius753 Posts: 138
    Automatic transmissions are different from manuals in that on a manual transmission, when you let out the clutch, the engine and transmission are directly linked.

    http://auto.howstuffworks.com/torque-converter.htm will help you understand how a torque converter works.

    Why would a manual get better mileage on the highway? It gets better on the highway by EPA measure. On a long trip at a constant speed where the auto stays in lock up condition, and thus lower RPM, the auto probably would actually get better mileage. The accelerating and decelerating in the EPA test probably result in the manual being slightly higher.
  • micwebmicweb Posts: 1,617
    You said in part:

    My brother in law, tries out the paddle shifters. I guess he doesn't really understand the concept of shifting. He grabs at the downshift, drops it down to first doing 45mph,

    This is why I recommended trying to get a Fit with fewer than 10 miles on it (you are the first driver) (not a hard thing to do since they are flying off the lots). Unlike, say, a Buick Lucerne, Fit test drivers are aggressive in their test drives.
  • Bought the Fit (Sport Automatic) the day it came out. Great car. The only thing I've noticed is that when I let off the throttle the car seems to deaccelerate quickly as if the engine were acting as a brake (something I would associate with a manual transmission). Is this normal? Is it related to the Drive by Wire or Direct Control system? Just wondering if others have noticed.
  • jonniedeejonniedee Posts: 111
    I'll bet you're not use to the "lock-up" torque convertor yet...
  • hondaman25hondaman25 Posts: 9
    Yes I've noticed the deacceleration when letting off the throttle. my opinion is it's a 5 speed automatic with more gear ranges that the engine can choose from thus giving the sensation of slowing quicker, plus keep in mind it's a VTEC engine that also has a distinct power band in mid range and when it reaches it's lower limit that sensation of deceleration could also be noticed.

    Just my opinion
  • ramoramo Posts: 66
    I have been reading a few owner's reviews at Yahoo, and the unsettling ones dealt with transmission problems. Has anyone got info on this?
    http://autos.yahoo.com/newcars/honda_fit_2007/4796/model_user_reviews.html;_ylt=- AhJxSQJAwoAbQwShfTXqrte5Ws8F?sort=mh&trimid=19021&modelid=4796&reviewid=1&review- num=33&start=1&show=atf
  • gearhead1gearhead1 Posts: 408
    Yeah, yahoo gets some Honda hater trolls that show up and write fake reviews. It's quite obvious, don't even worry about it. It's pretty easy to spot the fake posts. Yahoo is useless and a joke.
  • els2023els2023 Posts: 29
    I have a sport automatic but have yet to use the paddle shifters. Is there somewhere on the dashboard that will tell you what gear you are in if you use the paddle shifters?

    What is the proper way to use them and select gears?

    Is there a way to hurt the vehicle when using them?
  • hungarian83hungarian83 Posts: 678
    I have the base MT, so mine has a little "Fit" symbol underneath the tachometer, but you should have a little digital number that says what gear it is in.

    If you use the paddle shifters while in D, you can use them to get a quick boost of passing power, for example by shifting down into 4th from 5th. It will return to its chosen gear setting after a few seconds though.

    If you put the gear selector in S, you can shift the car manually with the paddle shifters. I would think the car have some sort of safety mechanism to prevent you from downshifting at too high of an engine speed, but I haven't driven it so I don't know. The owner's manual should tell you.
  • bodble2bodble2 Posts: 4,519
    If it is anything like the sportshift on the TL, if you try to shift into too low a gear, it won't shift but it will "remember" your request. And when the rpm have dropped sufficiently, it will complete the downshift.
  • mtngalmtngal Posts: 1,911
    Yes, there is a number shown on the dash when you use the paddles. There must be some safety thing that won't let the engine shift lower than it should - one time I wanted to downshift to 4th, not realizing that the car had already done so automatically. It shifted to 3d and I wanted to shift it back up to 4th but accidentally used the downshift paddle (I was flustered). I was going about 65 and it (happily) did NOT try to shift to 2nd.
  • I have to tell you, no matter what you read, hear or speak, the MT is the way to go. Those paddle shifters are a joke. I test drove one, it is a gimmick. They don't do anything special. The only way to get the most out of your little 1500cc engine is to drive the manual 5 spd. If you don't know how to drive a manual, learn!
  • johnnyvjjohnnyvj Posts: 112
    I have to tell you, no matter what you read, hear or speak, the MT is the way to go. Those paddle shifters are a joke. I test drove one, it is a gimmick. They don't do anything special.

    Odd... Car and Driver, in its one-page test in the June issue of a Fit Sport AT, seemed to like the paddle shifters very much. Though they did agree that they still prefer manual.

    Still, they much preferred the paddles to a conventional automatic. :)
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