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What Keeps You Loyal To A Brand?

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Comments

  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043
    $1,000 starts to get my attention. :shades: And they say it's cheaper to retain a customer than "conquest" one.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Mazda3 SkyActiv price quotes I got were hard to believe. They definitely pushed the best deals.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043
    US sales are down for Mazda overall, right?
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Haven't looked, but supply > demand means the consumer gets a deal.
  • karhill1karhill1 Posts: 98
    I find the loyalty discounts at odds with a manufacturer working to attract new customers. If, for example, I visit a Mazda dealer and they tell me I will have to pay $1,000 more than the person in the next booth simply because I am not a repeat customer there is no way I am buying a Mazda.

    That actually happened a couple of years ago. As the dealer would not budge, I left and bought a Honda and have since bought three more Hondas. I suppose I could have found a Mazda dealer who would have taken care of me but Mazda had its best chance to win me as a customer and they did not.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Alternately, some offer conquest rebates and that makes you want to be disloyal.
  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043

    Want to get a deal on your favorite brand? Shop where the brand sells well.

    "Regions where certain brands are popular will naturally be targeted by the manufacturers of those cars—and by their competition. Case in point: The Chrysler 200 sells for 1.5% less in Detroit, Mich. than Los Angeles, Calif., according to transaction prices tracked by Edmunds.com. “If there’s a lot of inventory and competition in that segment heavy incentives will be pushed for those cars,” says Richard Arca, senior manager of pricing for price-comparison website Edmunds.com. A Mercedes-Benz C-Class—popular in Los Angeles—is 2% cheaper there than in Kentucky, based on the Edmunds.com data."

    Want a car deal? Buy whatever your neighbor drives (marketwatch.com)

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,371
    edited January 12

    I'm loyal to Chevrolet and that makes some people crazy, telling me why I shouldn't be. LOL

    Low initial price, styling, better warranty than many others, cheap to maintain, employs more USA workers and suppliers than other automakers, my personal car must be built in U.S. as well. Some new Silverados are built in Mexico; I believe those are the only Chevys built there. The Sonic is the only U.S.-built subcompact. My Service Writer came from a Honda store to a Chevy store, and while he said warranty fixes might have been less common there, his experience was that Honda rarely if ever went over and above the standard warranty, while Chevy does. (He stated he was beat up for high warranty costs while at the Honda store.) I also own a used Mopar and while it has had more issues than my cheapo Cobalts (I own two), my Chrysler dealer recent replaced the brake booster and check valve for free, not a recall, and considering I didn't buy the car there and I bought it used, I can't really ask for much more than that. I keep cars a long time too. How much more will people pay upfront for that perception of reliability?

  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043

    "Ford Motor Co. earned honors as the car company with the most loyal customers, while Cadillac was named the most improved brand in terms of customer loyalty.

    Loyalty is determined when a household that owns a new vehicle returns to market and purchases or leases another new vehicle of the same model or make."

    Toyota Prius, Ford F-150 Have the Most Loyal Customers, Per Polk Survey

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,459

    @Stever@Edmunds said:

    Loyalty is determined when a household that owns a new vehicle returns to market and purchases or leases another new vehicle of the same model or make."

    Model is redundant in that description Off the top of my head, I can't think of models with same name from different manufacturers. :o

  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043
    edited February 3

    I took it to mean that someone who had been happy with a couple of Caravans might be more willing to go to a 300 when they decide to downsize, instead of to, say, a Malibu. I bet some of that is dealer loyalty too.

    Kind of hard for me to relate to the whole idea though. Don't trade cars often and haven't had the same make twice since the old Bug days in the late 70s. Well, I guess an old Datsun wagon and a Nissan minivan counts as the same make.

  • PFFlyer@EdmundsPFFlyer@Edmunds Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,810

    I'm not sure that many of these Super Bowl commercials would do much to sway me towards a brand.

    PFFlyer@Edmunds

    Moderator - Hatchbacks & Hybrid Vehicles

  • Stever@EdmundsStever@Edmunds YooperlandPosts: 39,043

    Says the man with what, six straight Nissans? :)

    Another friend wasn't impressed, although the Audi one was okay.

  • PFFlyer@EdmundsPFFlyer@Edmunds Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,810
    edited February 3

    @Stever@Edmunds said: Says the man with what, six straight Nissans? :)

    Another friend wasn't impressed, although the Audi one was okay.

    I think we're up to 10 straight ;) but to be fair, they followed a Vega!

    PFFlyer@Edmunds

    Moderator - Hatchbacks & Hybrid Vehicles

  • explorerx4explorerx4 Central CTPosts: 9,459

    Currently, my name is on 6 Fords, plus I helped my mother buy another one. There were several others between the oldest and newest still owned.

  • PFFlyer@EdmundsPFFlyer@Edmunds Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,810

    @explorerx4 said: Currently, my name is on 6 Fords, plus I helped my mother buy another one. There were several others between the oldest and newest still owned.

    That Vega drove me to ANYTHING else. :o

    My future wife was getting her first new car in 1979 and we looked at almost everything and settled on a 1979 Datsun B210 hatch. Then I got a 1980 Sentra. (all these cars are manual trannies BTW) Then came an '83 Sentra, an '86 4x4 pickup truck, an '88 Stanza "wagon", a 1990 Sentra, '96 Sentra, 2001 Altima, 2007 Versa, 2010 Versa (which saved the wife as it was totaled), 2011 Versa, and 2012 Versa. All of them went to high miles. Lowest were the first couple we took to only about 60K. From the '83 thru the 2001 Altima, all of those we drove to well over 200K. The 2007 is currently at about 120,000. the 2011 is approaching 90K, and the 2012 is almost at 50K. We've had ONE clutch linkage break in all those miles, and never replaced a clutch even with two kids learning to drive stick. I'm thinking it's the longevity that's kept me loyal

    So that's 12... lucky 13 is coming up and probably going to be a 2014 Versa Note

    PFFlyer@Edmunds

    Moderator - Hatchbacks & Hybrid Vehicles

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,371

    The CR on my drugstore's rack right now shows the Altima to be "much worse than average" reliability. I was a little surprised to see that.

  • PFFlyer@EdmundsPFFlyer@Edmunds Pennsylvania Furnace, PAPosts: 5,810

    @uplanderguy said: The CR on my drugstore's rack right now shows the Altima to be "much worse than average" reliability. I was a little surprised to see that.

    That would kind of surprise me as well, given my history with the brand over approximately 2 million miles. ( gonna have to total that up one of these days)

    PFFlyer@Edmunds

    Moderator - Hatchbacks & Hybrid Vehicles

  • uplanderguyuplanderguy Kent, OHPosts: 7,371

    For some reason--and I've always been skeptical of their statistical methods for reliability--but some of their reliability ratings change from one month to the next. The only thing I can think of is, they continued to add data monthly, or it's an editing goof.

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