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Honda Odyssey Transmission Problems

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Comments

  • Don't Forget to post some Pics of you Sign
    I wanna see that!!.
  • Well, what I assumed was a transmission leak apparently is a leaking rear main seal on my '02 Ody. It started at just over 81K miles. This seems very premature to me. I got an '90 Aerostar with over 190K and a '97 Skylark with over 122K and they don't leak anything. Anybody else experience this in this mileage range and what was the cost? Not sure if I should pressure Honda to fix it or not. Thanks in advance.
  • Ok,Folks,For my Own good I am getting a Chevrolet Venture,I am getting rid of the Ody,,No Longer want a Oddy,even new ones have that transmission issues,Not Only Ody's But,Accords and Civics as well.

    See this Link:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=9EK_-3TFD2E
  • Would you mind sharing the temporary fix with us?
  • I am not sure of the statutes on this but I wonder if a new class action suit could be started?

    I would be willing to obtain the following domains;

    www.hondaodysseysuck.com
    www.hondaodysseylemon.com
    www.hondaodysseytransmissionfailure.com

    We can go back to grassroots Internet efforts - the "Open Letter". It may not work but then again it might. At the very least we can post our complaints and Honda America Corp will NOT like those domains and the accompanying keywords showing up on the WorldWideWaste :)

    I will also buy Google keywords to make sure we come up on the top of the search:)

    You can respond to this via the group here or to peter.giza@gmail.com with ODYSSEY LEMON in the subject line.

    There are way too many people have problems including myself with a 2001 EX will its second transmission failed at 136K miles and Honda refuses to do anything for me except charge me a "bargain" $2500 for a new tranny installed.

    Best regards,

    Peter
  • jchan2jchan2 Posts: 4,956
    The person I was replying to said that "reloading the software" worked temporarily (whatever "reloading the software" is), and that's what I was referring to.

    I don't think that fix lasted very long, though.

    And to the person about to get a Chevrolet Venture, please don't. Just look at the safety records of the Venture. At least get a Sienna.
  • stushstush Posts: 62
    I'm about to shock or downright anger you Odyssey owners. If you're going to look at other vans, why not Hyundai. Now close all your mouths. I've had the Entourage since 6/06. Now with 26,000 miles and it's driving fine. Sure I have had some of the common problems that have popped up on the Hyundai forums. But the dealer has bent over backwards to solve the problems quickly and efficiently. Just give it a test drive. You never know.
  • I'd have to agree that Hyundai and actually, KIA are very respectable products. I've driven both as rental cars and was quite impressed.

    I speculate that the Korean manufacturers are where Honda was several years ago before they got full of themselves. My next new car (coming up soon thanks to my dying oddy) is likely to be either a Hyundai or KIA, though I do plan on giving the Domestics a second look as well. My Oddy experience taught me that my blind "faith" in Honda was misplaced; I think each model/purchase deserves considerable scrutiny - I would guess many other buyers were in the same boat. I had very good experiences with my previous Hondas but it's the extremely poor customer service that was the kicker - they could have retained me a potential future customer for a couple grand (shared cost) and actively chose not to...
  • stushstush Posts: 62
    I have to agree with you 2002odymike. It doesn't matter what brand vehicle you drive. If the dealer listens to your problems and strives to solve it quickly with no "thats just normal" remarks, you will stick with that make of vehicle. Every person I know who has owned a Honda, says, you get in, turn the key and it starts. Maybe the reason the dealers aren't used to handling customer complaints is because they never really had to before. You turn the key and it started.
  • Karen_CMKaren_CM Posts: 5,020
    There is no need to obtain a domain. You can create a blog from your CarSpace page with the terms you like that will be picked up by search engines.

    Community Manager If you have any questions or concerns about the Forums, send me an email, karen@edmunds.com, or click on my screen name to send a personal message.

  • Got the Odyssey back after dealer said the Power Control Module needed replacing. They did 23 tests that indicated it was the problem (this is after reloading the software in Sep 07, then a week later replacing the speed sensor, all for the "low price of ~$700). It took a week for them to decide the PCM was the problem and replace it. I picked it up after paying $1032 for parts and labor. I drove it 1/2 mile and the TCS, Engine and D lights came on!! I turned around and drove it right back into the dealer. They refunded my $1032 and said they would fix it. Hmmm! The adventure continues.
  • pa10pa10 Posts: 1
    I bought a new Ody last October and from day 1 my wife and I noticed a vibration from the undercarriage at around 45 mph and lasts to about 55mph. Dealer says there is no service bulletin and that the problem might be endemic to the 07 models. Has anyone with an 07 noticed this? It is disconcerting both from a mechanical perspective and from a trust-in-honda perspective.

    Thanks folks!
  • That was our first sign last year that our 07 EX had something wrong. It started on vacation and there was a bad valve in the transmission. They dealer tried alot of things but finally had to "listen" to the actual valve and insert some type of camera to see the problem. Honda shipped a new tranny and replaced that one.....which I believe was the start of our many problems. I don't mean to be discouraging, but we are on our third transmission and have multiple other issues now due to removing the first tranny. Our van is at the dealer right now for the last time (we just filled under the Georgia Lemon Law). Techs from Honda are looking at it now. We are just praying that this will resolve the many issues we have had for the past 8 months.

  • UPDATE: :lemon: :mad: :lemon:

    The field tech....?? drove our van today and of course said the transmission jerking you back and forth at almost every stop and downshift is a NORMAL CHARACTERISTIC of the Honda van's transmission. Not to mention the whistling windshield, the popping front end and the sloppy brakes!

    WARNING:
    Don't buy one of these pieces of junk unless you want to give yourself and anyone that rides with you whiplash!

    I guess we will be seeing them in Arbitration because they have got me mad enough about this to go all the way to the Georgia Supreme Court.
  • WOW! I haven't posted on Edmunds since 2000 when I was searching for info on the new Solara convertible.. oh good times.. but now I am back and reading about the Honda Odyssey transmission problems and wishing I would have bought another Toyota. My 2003 van just "died" this past Sat-- in the middle of my birthday night out with my husband. The evening ended with a tow to the dealer and us getting a ride home from a friend and me yelling "F%$K" at the top of my lungs every hour til 2 am.
    Anyway-my car has 80K and just under 5 years. $3500 the dealer says to fix it. I have a call into Honda Corporate and they are to "get back with me within two days".. okay- so its been more now. Thanks. I am just so depressed now cause its just horrible how service in the US has just declined so bad..

    After reading most of these posts I feel like we won't get reimbursed and we will have a few long years ahead of us with Honda Odyssey problems. Anyone know if the Sienna is having any issues?? We may consider selling it once it's fixed. I wonder if anyone would even buy it after the transmission is replaced. I still can't believe that so may people are having issues and Honda isn't fixing the issue!! I am so pissed off. This is crazy. Class action--?? Count me in! :lemon:
  • THIS IS FROM www.autosafety.org
    It is worth lookinng into.

    Secret Warranties

    Secret warranties are a multi-billion consumer abuse. Every auto company makes mistakes in building cars. Whether they are design defects that affect every car or whether they are manufacturing defects which affect only some cars, they must be repaired. The only question is who pays for the manufacturers' mistakes, the manufacturer or the consumer. Although the auto manufacturer often establishes a secret warranty to pay for the repair, all too often it is the consumer who pays for the manufacturer's mistake because the consumer never finds out about the secret warranty. That's wrong and the Center for Auto Safety wants to change it.

    In a 1987 report the Center for Auto Safety (CAS) created national headlines by identifying 10 exemplary secret warranties covering 30 million vehicles and $3 billion in repair costs. Yet this is but the tip of the iceberg for we estimate that at any one time over 500 secret warranties exist for all auto companies. According to a Toyota whistleblower who provided a complete list in May 1988, Toyota alone had 41 secret warranties at that time.

    By exposing secret warranties, CAS forces manufacturers to pay for their mistakes and creates a strong incentive for them to build better cars in the future. once secret warranties are disclosed, consumers will save hundreds, if not thousands, in repair bills on their personal cars. Spurred on by CAS exposes, state legislatures are moving to pass secret warranty disclosure laws that will protect consumers. Until then, consumers must rely on the strategies suggested in our book, Little Secrets of the Auto Industry, to discover and use secret warranties to pay for repairs in their vehicles.

    What is a secret warranty?
    Auto companies hate the term secret warranties. They call them policy adjustments or good will programs or extended warranties. But whatever they are called, they are a longstanding industry practice. When a car company has a major defect that occurs after its written warranty expires, it establishes an adjustment policy to pay for repairs rather than deal with many thousands, if not millions, of complaints on a case by case basis. But the auto company communicates the policy only to regional offices and not even always to its dealers. The auto manufacturers never notify the consumer; so only the consumer who complains loudly enough gets covered by the secret warranty. Other consumers end up bearing the costs of the manufacturer's mistakes.

    Examples of Secret Warranties
    CAS has documented case after case of secret warranties since our founding in 1970. one of the first and most famous was Ford's J-67 Limited Service Program which covered rust on 12 million 1969-72 cars and trucks. In this case a bulletin which went out only to Ford regional offices stated, "This is a limited service program without dealership notification and should be administered on an individual complaint basis." Under this program, Ford would pay up to 100% to repair rust and paint damage on its vehicles even if it cost over a $1000.

    CAS has uncovered secret warranties on all auto companies with little differences between them. A 1972 Mazda secret warranty bulletin doubled the coverage for rotary engine damage but cautioned, "Since this is a temporary program which may be terminated at [any] time, owners are not to be informed of the extended coverage." Honda had secret warranties on head gaskets and rusting fenders in the mid-1970's; Chrysler had rusting fenders on Volares and Aspens in the late 1970's; GM had the transmission secret warranty caused by a ban on sperm whale oil as a lubricant; Peugeot and Subaru both covered defective head gaskets; and VW covered valve stem seals.

    Secret warranties soared after 1980 when the federal government dropped all efforts to ban them. GM had a 5 year/50,000 mile secret warranty covering repair of defective rack and pinion power steering systems on all 16 million of its 1981-88 front wheel drive cars. Toyota covered pulsating brakes on its 1983-86 Camry in a $100 million secret warranty. Ford never told owners of its 1985-92 F-series pickups that America's most popular truck had peeling paint because Ford skipped the primer layer. According to Nissan documents provided to CAS by a whistleblower in 1990, Nissan had at one time up to 48 secret warranties covering various cars and trucks.

    There is no doubt that auto manufacturers presently have many other secret warranties. However, assessing how widespread secret warranty programs are is difficult because these programs, by definition, are not intended for public disclosure. Since CAS began exposing secret warranties more widely in the 1980's, the auto makers having gotten better at keeping them secret. Even CAS can no longer get lists of secret warranties to disclose. one Honda insider told CAS that Honda has only one secret warranty book for each of its regions. The book is chained to a desk. Every page has the region's number superimposed on it so that any photo of a book page would show the region from which it came.

    But it is known that the regulatory climate has been very favorable to the automakers since 1980. Furthermore, secret warranties are viewed by the automakers as an effective tool to maintain good customer relations. Loyal customers and customers that complain loudly and persistently are rewarded. Other consumers get saddled with repair costs caused by the manufacturers' mistakes.

    No Uniform Law Requires Secret Warranty Disclosure
    No federal law requires auto companies to disclose secret warranties. In the late 1970's, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) sought to litigate individual secret warranties against each auto company beginning with piston scuffing and cracked blocks in 1976-78 Fords. The FTC settled its case by requiring Ford to notify and directly compensate owners according to the secret warranty policy and to notify all future owners until the consent agreement expired eight years later in 1988. Although the FTC later filed similar complaints and actions against GM, VW, Honda, and Chrysler in the late 1970's, it dropped the requirement of secret warranty notification. In 1981 after the change of Administrations, the Commission completely dropped its efforts to expose secret warranties.

    Where a secret warranty exists, consumers could ban together to file a class action against the manufacturer for an unfair trade practice but this is a major effort which is rarely used and is a poor substitute for a disclosure law. In 1989, CAS helped the Center for Public Interest Law successfully sue Toyota over a secret warranty that covered up to $1800 in repair costs for pulsating brakes in over 400,000 1983-87 Camrys. To settle CAS' class action Toyota agreed to 1) notify all present and past owners, 2) reimburse consumers for all repair expenses already incurred, and repair all cars with this defe
  • Where a secret warranty exists, consumers could ban together to file a class action against the manufacturer for an unfair trade practice but this is a major effort which is rarely used and is a poor substitute for a disclosure law. In 1989, CAS helped the Center for Public Interest Law successfully sue Toyota over a secret warranty that covered up to $1800 in repair costs for pulsating brakes in over 400,000 1983-87 Camrys. To settle CAS' class action Toyota agreed to 1) notify all present and past owners, 2) reimburse consumers for all repair expenses already incurred, and repair all cars with this defect that had not yet been repaired. CAS estimates the total cost to Toyota to be over $100 million, most of which would have been borne by consumers but for CAS' action.

    State Secret Warranty Laws
    In order to protect consumers from undisclosed defects, four states (California, Connecticut, Virginia, and Wisconsin) have enacted secret warranty laws and other states are considering secret warranty legislation. The state secret warranty laws already enacted require manufacturers to disclose their "warranty adjustment" programs by giving direct notice of any warranty extension to affected owners, including information about the terms of the warranty, and provision for reimbursement to consumers who already have paid for the covered repair. Until all states enact and enforce secret warranty laws, consumers will be kept in the dark about secret warranties.

    How to Find a Secret Warranty
    Until secret warranty disclosure laws become the law of the land, the only way to find out about secret warranties is just plain hard work. First, one checks the technical service bulletins for your vehicle type and model year. Service bulletins are published by the manufacturer and sent to dealerships to assist them in diagnosing and repairing problems on the vehicles they service. The existence of a service bulletin does not conclusively prove the auto company has a secret warranty but it does show a defect or problem exists for which the manufacturer has had to develop a repair. Service bulletins can be difficult to decipher, but it is well worth the effort. Finding the right bulletin could save you thousands of dollars in repair costs. The right bulletin is the one that tells the dealer how to diagnose and fix the problem. It also will authorize the dealer to make the repairs at the manufacturer's expense even though the defect is no longer covered by the manufacturer's express warranty.

    The trouble is that manufacturers often do not put the terms authorizing free repair in the technical service bulletins but give this information only to their factory representatives so that both the dealer and consumer are kept in the dark. Watch for code words in bulletins such as "check for availability of good will assistance." Companies often use such language to get around the triggering requirements for customer notification in states that have secret warranty disclosure laws.

    Secret warranties are often revealed when owners of vehicles of the same type and age are treated differently by the dealer or manufacturer. If some owners get their vehicles repaired at no cost or at a discount whereas other owners of the same vehicle do not, it is possible that a secret warranty covers the defect involved. However, it is also possible that the dealer or manufacturer has decided on a case-by-case basis to reimburse a relatively small number of owners to retain their goodwill and not as part of a warranty adjustment program. To constitute a secret warranty, the difference in treatment of customers must be based on a corporate policy to reimburse owners that is communicated to regional offices and usually also to dealers but that is not communicated to consumers.

    How to Use a Secret Warranty
    After determining that your vehicle is covered by a secret warranty, the next step is to take advantage of your knowledge. The best way to do this is to take the service bulletin that proves the existence of the secret warranty with you when you go to your dealer to get the defect repaired. Without the bulletin, you will have a much more difficult time getting the dealer to repair your vehicle free of charge. Even if the dealer refuses to recognize the existence of the secret warranty [he might not know that the secret warranty exists] or if your vehicle is beyond the period of coverage of the secret warranty, he still may repair your vehicle at no expense as part of a goodwill adjustment.

    If the dealer claims your vehicle is not covered by a secret warranty and refuses to give you a goodwill adjustment, your next step is to pursue your claim directly with the manufacturer. You should do this for two reasons. First, unlike dealers, the manufacturer will know always know if a certain defect in one of its own vehicles is covered by a secret warranty. Second, every manufacturer has a system to handle consumer complaints, which should be followed even though it may not work in most cases. Complaint handling mechanisms outside the manufacturer's system (e.g. arbitration) require exhaustion of all remedies that the manufacturer provides.

    Contact the manufacturer's division (also called regional, district or zone) office in your area. The locations and correct names of district offices and the complaint procedures are often spelled out in the owner's manual. If the manufacturer's representative refuses to see you, contact the regional office or the manufacturer's owner relations office, often located in Detroit for domestic manufacturers, California for Japanese and Asian manufacturers, and New Jersey for European manufacturers.

    If the manufacturer refuses to extend the secret warranty to your vehicle (perhaps because your car is beyond the time or mileage requirements of the secret warranty), do not give up. Manufacturers only reimburse those owners who complain loudly and persistently; those who put off complaining, or who never complain at all, must pay for the manufacturer's mistakes.

    The next step is to make enough noise outside the manufacturer's complaint handling system to get results. A strong commitment is necessary to successfully use this procedure, because you will not get results unless you are willing to persistently follow up letters and phone calls.

    Complain in writing to the manufacturer's Chairman of the Board or President with copies of that letter to others. Set forth the defect covered by the secret warranty clearly and precisely within the letter and refer to the collected documentation of the car's troubles and your attempts to have the car repaired "within the system."

    Send copies to various organizations such as local and national consumer groups, local and state consumer protection agencies, state attorneys general, federal agencies and members of Congress. Even if these agencies or groups cannot act directly on your behalf, they may send complaints on to the man
  • Send copies to various organizations such as local and national consumer groups, local and state consumer protection agencies, state attorneys general, federal agencies and members of Congress. Even if these agencies or groups cannot act directly on your behalf, they may send complaints on to the manufacturer requesting that the manufacturer take action.

    Tell the local media about your secret warranty problem. Many consumers get reimbursed because a local Action Line, newspaper or television station starts to take an interest in a secret warranty. After all, if a manufacturer is trying to keep a secret warranty secret, the last thing the company wants is publicity on the secret warranty. A particularly good strategy is to announce the formation of a group to expose the particular secret warranty affecting your car. Even if the group is small as you and your neighbor, a group is powerful and attracts more attention than an individual.

    Small Claims Court
    Manufacturers often stonewall the consumer over secret warranties knowing that many consumers will give up in utter frustration and go away mad. Don't. Take the documentation on the secret warranty and your repair efforts to small claims court. At this point, it's the manufacturer who often gives up knowing that the legal rights are on the consumer's side. The manufacturer relies on its own complaint handling mechanism to wear down consumers. once you show you won't be beat by the manufacturer's complaint handling mechanism, you should succeed. The manufacturer will finally recognize its responsibility for the defect in your car and reimburse you.

    Conclusion
    The squeaky wheel gets the grease. The consumers who complain the loudest get reimbursed under secret warranties. The good customer who goes away quietly gets ripped off. Until auto companies wake up and realize that consumer protection is good business, consumers have to be aggressive or they will wind up paying for an auto company's mistake. Since billions of dollars in repairs are covered by secret warranties, the total benefit to consumers in exercising their rights is enormous.
  • What 36K mile warranty are you talking about? Honda will not give you 36k miles for the refurbished transmission...I'm not exactly sure what is was on our last 3 Honda V6 trannsmissions.
  • From NHTSA
    look on their website for more. You might be able to push them for more than the 1/2 if you can be louder than they are. If you are very loud, they might cover it all as a "goodwill gesture".

    Make / Models : Model/Build Years:
    ACURA / 3.2CL 2001-2003

    ACURA / 3.2TL 2000-2004

    ACURA / MDX 2001-2002

    HONDA / ACCORD 2003-2004

    HONDA / ODYSSEY 2002-2004

    HONDA / PILOT 2003-2004

    Recall Number: 04V176000
    Summary:
    ON SOME MINI VANS, SPORT UTILITY AND PASSENGER VEHICLES, CERTAIN OPERATING CONDITIONS CAN RESULT IN HEAT BUILD-UP BETWEEN THE COUNTERSHAFT AND SECONDARY SHAFT SECOND GEARS IN THE AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION, EVENTUALLY LEADING TO GEAR TOOTH CHIPPING OR GEAR BREAKAGE.
    Consequence:
    GEAR FAILURE COULD RESULT IN TRANSMISSION LOCKUP, WHICH COULD RESULT IN A CRASH.
    Remedy:
    ON VEHICLES WITH 15,000 MILES OR LESS, THE DEALER WILL UPDATE THE TRANSMISSION WITH A SIMPLE REVISION TO THE OIL COOLER RETURN LINE TO INCREASE LUBRICATION TO THE SECOND GEAR. ON VEHICLES WITH MORE THAN 15,000 MILES, THE DEALER WILL INSPECT THE TRANSMISSION TO IDENTIFY GEARS THAT HAVE ALREADY EXPERIENCED DISCOLORATION DUE TO OVERHEATING. IF DISCOLORATION EXISTS, THE TRANSMISSION WILL BE REPLACED IF DISCOLORATION IS NOT PRESENT, THE DEALER WILL PERFORM THE REVISION TO THE OIL COOLER RETURN LINE. THE RECALL BEGAN ON APRIL 21, 2004, FOR PILOT, ODYSSEY, AND MDX OWNERS. OWNERS OF THE ACCORD VEHICLES WILL START RECEIVING LETTERS ON JUNE 28, 2004, AND ON JUNE 29, 2004, FOR OWNERS OF THE TL AND CL VEHICLES. OWNERS SHOULD CONTACT HONDA AT 1-800-999-1009 OR ACURA AT 1-800-382-2238.
    Notes:
    HONDA RECALL NOS. P30 (ODYSSEY AND PILOT), P31 (MDX), P38 (ACCORD) AND P39 (ACURA). CUSTOMERS CAN ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION¿S AUTO SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-888-DASH-2-DOT (1-888-327-4236).
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