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Accord - Manual or Automatic?

13

Comments

  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    Does your truck have triple cone synchronyzers?

    I haven't the slightest idea. It's a chevy. If a tranny with triple cone synchronizers still has a clutch and a shift lever, I'd rather have an automatic.

    If you consider shifting a hassle, what do you consider excersising 3-4 times a week?

    I get plenty of exercise every day at work, thanks anyway. I'd rather relax while I'm driving. Many car reviewers have mentioned how well the Accord's automatic works (always seems to be in the right gear).
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    My 5 spd. truck is a royal PITA in the bumper to bumper. Just aweful. Slow torture.

    Drive a Honda stick. You keep bringing up how bad your truck's stick is. What is it? a Mack?

    Why does a sports car have to have the benefit of having superior transmission, but the grocery getter can not?
  • blueiedgodblueiedgod Posts: 2,803
    When I need to really MOVE though, there's no wondering "could I drop to second without redlining? It might be a close call, I better make it third" only to find out that third was too tall of a gear. In some situations, the automatic's computer programming can think faster than the driver.

    An automatic means I don't have to be left wondering. Sure, automatics "dumb down" the driving experience. I'll be the first person in line to tell ya that. No argument from me. it is a "safe" option though, in my opinion. If the driver is not thinking clearly, the automatic is.


    I have to admit that I have not driven the new 5 spd auto extensivley, I did test drive the 2005 CR-V auto and manual. Auto took forever to shift down when I pressed the pedal to the metal on a test drive.

    Besides, automatics are a REACTIVE system, they react to what HAS ALREADY happened.

    Manuals, because of the direct input from the driver, are PROACTIVE systems. They react BEFORE the event.

    I confess, I owned an automatic vehicle, a 2001 CR-V. It was horrible, to get it to change speed you have to press the gas all the way into the floor, wait 5 seconds before the engine spun up, then another 5 seconds for the tranny to shift. By that time, the opportunity was lost and I had to brake so that I don't hit the vehicle in front of me.

    Manual, is much much easier in that aspect. I see an opportunity in my rearview mirror, I select the gear that I will need to merge into "the opportunity" and hold the engine at the higher RPM to maintain the current speed and wait for the "opportunity" to get closer, as the "opportunity" is in place, I just punch it, and I am in. No waiting for the engine to spin up, no waiting for the tranny yo decide what gear to use. I have Pre-emptivley selected the proper gear and was done with it.
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    I confess, I owned an automatic vehicle, a 2001 CR-V. It was horrible, to get it to change speed you have to press the gas all the way into the floor, wait 5 seconds before the engine spun up, then another 5 seconds for the tranny to shift.

    If it took ten seconds from flooring it to downshift, you had a major transmission problem.

    That gen of CR-V was particularly slow with the 2.0. My aunt had a '97 and it was DOG slow. She traded it for an Odyssey which was much more powerful. You are comparing a 4-speed automatic from a ten-year old design... things have improved since then (I still say ten seconds to drop gears is a MAJOR exaggeration unless your car has problems).

    I have a fairly quick car, an Accord, and have never been the type to need to "squeeze" into a hole in traffic to pass. If I needed a pre-emptive drop to third gear on the highway, though, I'd shift to D3 while waiting on my "hole" to appear. Always though, punching the throttle drops me two gears very quick.

    I like manuals, trust me. They're a hoot. I'm not arguing that. But automatics aren't the slow-as-christmas pieces of crap that some people (not necessarily anyone here) like to make them out to be.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    I owned an automatic vehicle, a 2001 CR-V. It was horrible, to get it to change speed you have to press the gas all the way into the floor, wait 5 seconds before the engine spun up, then another 5 seconds for the tranny to shift. By that time, the opportunity was lost and I had to brake so that I don't hit the vehicle in front of me.

    Now we know why that CR-V would do 0-60 in about 10 seconds. :P
  • thegraduatethegraduate Posts: 9,731
    Well of course! It's not even into 2nd gear by that point. It probably did it in 25 seconds if the car thinks 10 seconds before shifting each gear!
  • bamacarbamacar Posts: 749
    According to Blue Book and Edmunds, the 2007 Accord V6 Sedans have an identical private party resale value for either transmission. Both starting points are $21891. Private party sale is the best way to sell a manual.

    I guess not offering the V6 manual isn't because of depreciation as they appear to be identical. Without a doubt, there is a smaller market for the manual so Honda may not think an additonal model is worth it.

    Of course there are also 80 used V6 auto sedans within 300 miles of me and only 4 V6 manual sedans. My experience is there is less demand, but also less supply. Actually in my experience, as Hondas/Mazdas/Toyotas age the demand for manual used cars begins to outstrip supply at a rate far greater than autos.
  • in my opinion manual is better and stronger than an automatic tranny.i have owned about 8 honda accords and never had to replace the clutch and all of my cars were between 200k miles to 500k miles with origanal cluthes,tranny and engine.honda make one of the best cluthes.I just sold my automatic 1989 honda accord for $1200 with 400000+ miles.check it out."WWW.HONDABEAT.COM".And click on high milage club
  • blufz1blufz1 Posts: 2,045
    How was the auto over the 400k? Thanks.
  • robertsmxrobertsmx Posts: 5,525
    According to Blue Book and Edmunds, the 2007 Accord V6 Sedans have an identical private party resale value for either transmission.

    I don't think it is as much a matter of resale value IMO as it is to find a buyer. It may be a non-issue when trading in, but likely when going private.

    For sports cars, exactly the opposite may apply. A friend of mine is struggling to sell her Boxster with auto.
  • ezshift5ezshift5 West coastPosts: 853
    ...all of my cars were between 200k miles to 500k miles with origanal cluthes,tranny and engine.honda make one of the best cluthes.

    .....while I'm delighted to hear your words, I'd be interested in your 'take' on the 7th Gen Accord V-6 clutch. (6M is great, but that clutch!!!!).........

    ...best...ez...
  • jaxs1jaxs1 Posts: 2,697
    The Accord EX V6 6 speed is a poor example or a self-serving example of resale.
    It has about the same value as the automatic because the 6-speed is a supposed to be some kind of "sport" model and has a few features not on the normal automatic version of the EXV6 and it will also be hard to find used due to low production.
    Everyone who buys the Accord 6-speed really wanted it and did not buy it to save money. Many people buy other manual transmission sedans and economy cars because they may be cheaper by $1000 or more even though they would have really preferred to get an automatic. Resale will reflect that.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,150
    According to Blue Book and Edmunds, the 2007 Accord V6 Sedans have an identical private party resale value for either transmission. Both starting points are $21891. Private party sale is the best way to sell a manual.

    I guess not offering the V6 manual isn't because of depreciation as they appear to be identical. Without a doubt, there is a smaller market for the manual so Honda may not think an additonal model is worth it.


    Unfortunately, Blue Book is worthless in the real world.

    What matters is dealer auction values and what people are willing to pay. If folks were willing to pony up just as much for a manual as an auto, the trade-in values would reflect that. Its just how the market works.

    Here is what is going to happen with my Accord lease. I was given the same residual value with my 6-speed as they were giving on the automatic. However, come the end of my lease, the 6-speed will fetch $1k less at the auction, thereby making Honda Finance lose $1k on my car compared to an automatic. So, yes, it has depreciated more.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • bamacarbamacar Posts: 749
    Once again not for private party value. If you sold it yourself, you would get the same price. Thus, depreciation for private sale is the same. Private party sales are excellent for manuals. Big car lots, auctions, and shady salesmen love automatics.
  • elroy5elroy5 Posts: 3,741
    What makes a manual a harder sell is this: If someone is looking to buy a manual, they will most likely settle for an automatic, if they can't find a manual quick enough. If someone is shopping for an automatic, it is usually the only choice, especially if they have never owned a manual before. Everyone knows how to drive an automatic. Many don't know how, or don't want to drive a standard.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,150
    your opinion and the real-world car market just don't agree.

    If a dealer pays $1k less for their manual car, they will sell it for $1k less than their automatic. Private party is typically $1k below dealer retail. It is just the way it works. So, in other words, auction values, dealer retail, private party, trade-in, are ALL tied directly to each other, and all are dictated by the buying public. But, whatever, if you don't believe it, that's your perogative. If you want to pay $1k more than you need to in order to buy a 6-speed used Accord, then go for it. I hope if I were to sell mine, I find a buyer like you.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • bamacarbamacar Posts: 749
    There are many markets for any product. Private party is one and the most advantageous for manual buyers and sellers. Big dealers want high volume sellers; manuals are not high volume. They will only give wholesale for many manuals. Try selling a million dollar homes at a thrift store. The clientele is not there to buy thus the demand is low - prices would be terrible. Though this is an extreme example, there are many different avenues for marketing.

    If you want to get ripped off and sell your Accord for $1k less (plus the multiple thousands less the dealer will give you to make him a substanial profit), go ahead and auction it or trade it in. I wish I could buy it and sell it for the $1k profit in the private sale market. Even better, I could probably make another $2-3k with the difference of the dealer trade in value and what I could sell it.

    Both private party and dealers are real world, just pick the more profitable one according to the car you have to sell.
  • maddog11maddog11 Posts: 42
    The 2006 V-5 6MT Accord sedans and coupe are worth $675.00 less than their AT counterparts. I an sure the 2007 6MT models will be worth less shortly.
  • qbrozenqbrozen Posts: 17,150
    best to keep that under your hat. folks want to believe what they want to believe.

    '13 Stang GT; '86 Benz 300E; '98 Volvo S70; '12 Leaf; '14 Town&Country

  • I remember something in news article mentioning that someone was carjacked while driving an Acura Integra in DC. The thief was confunded by the clutch and dumped the car 2 blocks away.
This discussion has been closed.