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Dodge Ram Quad Cab

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  • lamarjlamarj Posts: 21
    http://www.smogcheck.ca.gov/stdpage.asp?BODY=/CONSUMER/BRINGING_A_CAR_TO_CALIFORNIA.HTM#label


    Do a quick copy/paste of this website to get more detailed info. I checked under my hood and looked on my window sticker. There is no mention of California emissions. The information all mentions Federal standards. According to the info on the website, although the vehicle does not meet California it can still be registered as long as all of the original emissions equipment is still on the vehicle and nothing has been tampered with.

  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    Does the emissions label say 50 state certified? I heard that the New Dodge is an ultra low emissions vehicle and if so would get a 50 state certification emissions label like the Toyota Sequoia.

    I can't buy it or register it here because I am a resident of California. The info you posted is for people moving to California. Does not apply to Californians buying cars out of state to get awesome deals.

    I will call the California EPA and see what is the latest information for 2002 vehicles that are ULEV.
  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    Thanks for the info you posted on crash data. I checked out the site and it is packed with info. I saw that the 2001 Dodge did poor in the offset crash. The design of pickup was like 8 years old and the designs on the other trucks were like 2-3 years old.

    The 2002 Dodge Ram did the best in the 5 mph bumper crash test and beat the Tundra. The Tundra was last. I believe that the 2002 Dodge should do good in the offset crash. It now has a stronger bumpers, a stronger frame with crumple zones and the truck has been updated with a lot of safety devices.

    I know that if does good on those tests, it will be a plus for Dodge Ram in safety and make a big impact on sales.

    You did forget to mention that the Ford 150 did the worse. :-)

    Before I get flamed by Tundra people, I like the Tundra it's a quality pickup. I just wished it was a quad cab.
  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    I checked the NHTSA's web page and found no recalls or technical service bulletins on the new Ram. So far the Ram is doing good on the quality issue.
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    i'm sure there have been some tsbs issued, they just haven't been loaded into the NHTSA database. eventually they'll be there. but, you are right, it does appear that dodge has done a reasonable job of getting a new, reasonably bug-free vehicle to market.
  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    Here's some info on the Hemi motor due to arrive on the 2003 Dodge Rams. It might be worth the wait. Ford, GM, and Toyota you better get out of Dodge's way.

    Check out the link below!


    http://allpar.com/mopar/new-mopar-hemi.html

  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    I saw this on the link provided above and had to post it.

    Hemi: (HEM -e) adj. Mopar in type, V8, hot tempered, native to the United States, carnivorous, eats primarily Mustangs, Camaros, and Corvettes. Also enjoys smoking a good import now and then to relax. - David Charles Gedraitis
  • indydriverindydriver Posts: 620
    Let's see....made in Mexico....iron block....pushrod valvetrain....only two valves per cylinder.....what's the excitement about? This is a heavy, low-tech, low investment engine. Not much to get excited about.
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    345hp/365lb-ft torque is something to be excited about. but it will only be competitive when it comes out...and not dominating.
  • lamarjlamarj Posts: 21
    How soon after a TSB has been generated by the manufacturer does it appear on the NHTSA web site?
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    it sometimes takes months, and it depends on how soon the company issues them externally, and then how fast NHTSA uploads them to their database. if you want a list of the latest tsbs, visit your local dealership...
  • pushplaypushplay Posts: 52
    not surprise me the F-150 did the worst. The F-150 is a joke. The only reason they sell so many is because they are cheap. Then people who buy them keep trying to tell the new Ram owners how good they are when we didn't ask to make them selves fell better. It is funny the Ram owners are not trying to bring down the Fords and Chevy's on their boards. We know what we got.
    THE BEST DAM TRUCK ON EARTH.
  • brando69brando69 Posts: 47
    My friend's friend is a Dodge mechanic and I will give him a call and see if he can generate any TSB's on the 2002 Dodge Ram Quad Cab.I will also get his opinion on the pickup from a mechanic's view. He's been a mechanic for Dodge for the past 15 years and started when he was 18 years old.

    Any Dodge mechanics reading this let us know what you think of the new Dodge Ram Quad Cab.
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    >>Let's see....made in Mexico....iron block....pushrod valvetrain....only two valves per cylinder.....what's the excitement about? This is a heavy, low-tech, low investment engine. Not much to get excited about.<<

    Where the engine is made is technically irrelevant. Capitalizing on a proven combustion chamber and single camshaft design may be retro if you're prone to follow the crowd and mind-locked (remember, the Wankel was going to replace every piston engine).

    Using aluminum heads and a new patented casting process, the new Chrysler Hemi is 67 pounds lighter and dimensionally smaller than the 360 CID "smallblock" engine it replaces. The Hemi won't need more than two valves per cylinder. It's open roof and canted valve arrangement will allow for much larger valves and significantly higher flow than could be realized by a wedge chamber. In addition, the two valve design enhances low flow combustion efficiency and increases low-end torque. The new 5.7 Hemis will produce just over 300 lbs. ft of torque at 1000 RPM! Using the hemispherical combustion chamber this engine will readily produce 1 HP per cubic inch and at higher compression ratios than the average production wedge.

    A 6.1 Liter hemi is planned for a 2004 introduction.

    The 4.7 engine received a larger throttlebody and intake manifold mid-year in 2001. There were also corresponding adjustments to the exhaust system.

    Dusty
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    dusty,

    you seem to know an aweful lot of what would seem to be insider info. how is that? so, is the 6.1 liter hemi gonna replace the v10??
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    ..............The rumor is that the V10 will be gone in a few years. Chrysler manufacturer's very few of these engines and its more difficult to amortise tooling and investment in changes to meet emissions, etc., when unit sales are so low. To make metters worse, the V10 is disproportionately more expensive to manufacture since some of the componentry is made with non-standard tooling. I think Chrysler is going to capitize on tooling and build different horsepower variants of their engines. For trucks, Chrysler can probably meet future consumer demands with four engines: 3.7 & 4.7 (same block less two cylinders, a 5.7 and a 6.1. With the exception of the 4.7 which can be DOHC, the 5.7 and 6.1 are being built around a in-block cam. These motors are being built specifically for trucks, although speculation is that Chryler's new rear-wheel drive platform (police car entry) will have a highly modified version of the 5.7 Hemi.

    With special interest groups banging on the government to increase truck CAFE to 36 MPG for everything under 10,000 GVW, the future of big horsepower in trucks may be very dim. There's already talk of a "horsepower tax" in some states (New York being one of them) and the demand for large displacement V8s might drop significantly in a couple of years.

    Since Chrysler opted out of the medium truck business in the seventies, Dodge truck has been confined to "light duty" series. (Also, they haven't had a "big block" motor since 1978.) However, sales of heavier trucks have increased proportionally more for Dodge than their competition and they want to expand this part of the market. The rumor is they are going to extend into the medium range using the new RAM cab with medium weight frames (they've already hinted at a RAM 4500 for 2003). Being a smaller, less cash flow company, this allows them to capitalize on design, tooling, and manufacturing space. From what I've heard, they believe they can easily go to 20,000 GVW using hydroformed frames and various brake and axle combinations (AG, Eaton, Rockwell, Spicer, TRW, etc.).

    Dusty
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    I forgot to mention that Dodge plans to introduce a new "super quiet" Cummins diesel in 2003.

    Dusty
  • indydriverindydriver Posts: 620
    My point regarding the forthcoming "Hemi" is that it is no big deal regarding its output/displacement. It uses 60's era hot rodding tricks, not new technology. Detroit can pump out these types of motors anytime it wants, without a lot of R&D cost i.e., new technology. Its a political issue, not a technological breakthrough. BTW, ask the folks in the Kokomo transmission plant if it will be "technically irrevelent" if that production is moved to Mexico.
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    ......different ways. In the case of the new 5.7 Hemi, materials and casting techniques have reduced the amount of machining. The reduced tooling and labor, lighter and smaller package at reduced manufacturing cost is an accomplishment. Does it really matter how that power is produced as long as its done efficiently? Would you feel better if the same horsepower were produced by a DOHC engine? You probably wouldn't realize a torque benefit and that engine would cost more to produce and to service.

    As far as "60s era hot rodding tricks," for what purpose was SOHC or DOHC developed? It most certainly wasn't for trucks. Advancements in efficiency and potential for piston engines have almost all come from high performance experimentation and concepts. The hemispherical combustion chamber just happened to be decades ahead of other approaches.

    Dusty
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    dusty,

    why then hasn't the hemi head been used more often in the last two decades? from what i've read the design (at least the old design) was a relative gas and emissions hog, thus the need for two spark plugs per cylinder in today's hemi. i'm not dogging the engine, i'm just saying that what you are purporting is contrary to what i've read in other places. btw, one hp per cube isn't that big a deal anymore...
  • xman1035xman1035 Posts: 52
    I am in the market for a pickup and have narrowed my choices to the new Dodge Ram Quad Cab 1500 and Toyota Tundra SR5 Access Cab. The Toyota has the reputation for reliability, excellent resale value and durability. The new Dodge has the reputation of being a quality product so far, nice styling and a very roomy interior.

    I would like to know why you new Dodge Ram QC 1500 owners picked it over other pickups.

    I am still on the sidelines and taking a hard look at both pickups.Thanks for your insights.
  • lamarjlamarj Posts: 21
    I'm sure you have been doing your homework and reading all of the posts. I bought mine for several reasons. It started with the best deal in the country, which is still available. It then led to what I believe is the very best vehicle purchase I have made in 20 years of buying (way to often). This truck is solid. You can really feel a difference. The reliability issue was on my mind, but the FREE 7 year/100,000 mile bumper to bumper took care of that. I have three children who fit very comfortably in the back seat. The truck obviously looks great. The handling is unbelievable. Tracks perfectly and takes corners as flat as a skate. Size matters and the Toyota is just not quite big enough for me. I am a Toyota/Honda fan. I remember seeing the first Tundra in a magazine. I was going to get one. I remember seeing the first one in person at a dealership that had just closed. I checked to see if the truck was locked. They forgot! I jumped in behind the wheel and the first thought was....this isn't a Tundra, it is a Tacoma. It was a Tundra. I could not believe they did not go ahead and super size it when they had a chance. Oh well. They just aren't making the big trucks.....yet. The Seqouia is pretty huge.

    I have corresponded with two people on these postings who have either traded their Toyota for a Ram or are going to.

    If you want info on the best deal in the country send me an email. You won't beleive ehat you can get this truck for. JLamar@knology.net Others here will back it up.
  • stooges3stooges3 Posts: 18
    Thanks for the info. That was a long wait you had. Hopefully they got a little faster with their production this time.
  • twinscrewtwinscrew Posts: 53
    I was under the impression the 7/100 warranty was only for the drive train after the initial warranty ran out. Did I buy my truck at the wrong time? Or did you have to pay extra for the "bumper to bumper"?
  • pushplaypushplay Posts: 52
    power train not bumper to bumper.
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    You are correct, 1 HP per cube isn't extraordinary by today's standards, but in a normally aspirated truck engine it stands out. Look at Ford and GM truck powerplants. While the potential for wedge engines to get to that level of power exists, the hemi can do this
    easily without multivalve, variable or longer duration cam timing. These techniques, while raising volumetric efficiency in wedges, is also very detrimental to low-end torque. They push the horsepower/torque band upwards which is also a negative for truck motors.

    For trucks especially, a hemispherical chamber makes a lot of sense. A much larger valve can be used for increased flow, yet a single valve
    arrangement will contribute to better low-end torque and overall
    performance. The hemi chamber, with its more symmetrical environment, lends itself to utilizing higher compression ratios and will tolerate higher throttle pressure thresholds without detonation.

    As far as meeting emissions, in 1972, the last year of the 426 Hemi, NOx emissions were probably harder to meet with that design because of the small confined pressure chamber (in those days NOx was controlled by reducing the combustion temperature by injecting a small amount of exhaust gas. Larger chamber surfaces contribute to lower combustion temperatures). But combustion chamber science has advanced significantly since then and much of the same techniques used for reducing emissions in wedges are readily adaptable to a
    hemispherical chamber. Mitsubishi built a 4-cyl hemi from 1974 through 2000 meeting federal emissions. And one Mercedes engine still uses that design.

    The Chrysler 426 Hemi died because it was expensive to build in 1972 and didn't have a market or a purpose (I've been recently informed that less than 1000 were built in the last year). From 1972 on Chrysler relied on their wedge engines because they were in inventory and had already amortised the tooling. By 1978 all the big blocks were gone and Chrysler could power everything they had with two V8s: the 318 and 360. There was no advantage three decades ago to use the hemi design, especially from a cost perspective, and GM and Ford were not interested in developing one for the very same reasons.

    By 1997, however, things had changed dramatically. Chrysler realized it had to update their engines and a new design incorporating a hemi chamber was now actually technically attractive. Chrysler, the only serious automotive manufacture interested in using one, had acquired a mountain of research science over the years and knew that when manufacturing costs could be brought down, the Hemi could come into it's own.

    One
    centralized in-block cam lowers tooling cost. It's got pushrods. Okay. Load losses from increased valvetrain mass are probably offset by the reduction of internal friction from avoiding a second camshaft. A new cylinder head design that takes advantage of new casting techniques reduces tooling and the complexity of assembly that was associated with the earlier Hemis. Modern casting techniques can better control piece-to-piece uniformity resulting in less tooling to dimension. In 2002, reduced components and tooling makes sense from a manufacturing cost perspective. The new 5.7 Hemi is cheaper to make than the 318-360 engines and even the newer 4.7L.

    Dusty
  • emaleemale Posts: 1,380
    thanks dusty, very interesting. but, you still haven't told us all about how you get your insider info...
  • dustykdustyk Posts: 2,926
    Well, much of what I've imparted has been available in various journals representing the automotive press. I worked in the industry many years ago and have maintained a varying degree of interest through the years. I did at one time work in my firms company car propgram and still have several contacts there. You might say that's my "ear-to-the-ground," sort of.

    Dusty
  • lamarjlamarj Posts: 21
    Hey! My drive train almost goes from bumper to bumper.........
  • xman1035xman1035 Posts: 52
    I have learned through contacts that the new Dodge Ram Quad Cab will be crash tested sometime this month. Hopefully, the new Dodge will pass with flying colors.
This discussion has been closed.