Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Subaru Outback Brake Questions

bhirish1960bhirish1960 Posts: 1
edited August 15 in Subaru
I have a Subaru Outback 2001 Wagon with the 2.5 liter boxer engine. It has 163,900 miles on it and runs well, that is, when the check engine light isn't on. The coil pack has been replaced twice, amongst other repairs. Safety-wise, it is a great car, but there are too many little things that go wrong that add up. 1) Is there a "recycle" feature in the ECU of this model that will shut off the light if the flaw has been repaired, or does the code stay in the ECU for a period of time and periodically repeats until the ECU updates? 2)Is that not a feature of the ECU in this car? 3)Also, are front rotors and pinion bushings common replacement items in these cars? Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks!
«1

Comments

  • terry92270terry92270 Posts: 1,247
    From what I have read, and what I personally have experienced, keeping any vehicle beyond 125,000 miles, is just what you said: "but there are too many little things that go wrong that add up." :sick:

    Bushings and rotors, at your mileage are indeed to the point of needing replacement, as well as the bearings.

    I think its time for you to be merciful, and say a loving goodbye to your trusted old friend..... :cry:
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    I don't know if it's time to say goodbye to the car or not; that depends on what condition it is in overall. But I will agree that at 160k+ mileage, wear is wear regardless of make or model.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    If my original rotors, on any car, last 163,900 miles, I will promptly do to church and pray to give thanks. That is incredible longevity.

    They're a wear item. Some cars would be on their 3rd set by then.

    Coil packs are cheap. $80 from an on-line Subaru wholesaler. Takes about 5 minute to change it, too.

    Try this - get a Chase Subaru credit card, and start accumulating Subaru Bucks. 3% back, basically.

    -juice
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,450
    Hmm. I guess I was under the impression that unless they warp, rotors should last quite a while. Mine are still original at 220K miles and I thought nothing of it. Granted, the first set of rear pads were replaced at 193K, so I should hope the rotors out-wear the pads!

    I will say I have spent quite a bit of time and money on this car to maintain it, but the longer I have it the more I doubt I would have spent any less on a modern car of any other make. I keep a practical mindset toward it and look at how much utility or return I get for every dollar/hour invested. So far, I think I have done well enough. Approximately $2,500/year TCO so far, and that amount tends to go down as the purchase price continues to be diluted by time (barring any more catastrophic problems!).

    As for the ECU reset, self-diagnosis happens either on real-time or under a pre-determined set of driving conditions. Once the problem is fixed the code will not re-log, but unless it is reset upon fix, it takes something like 40 (diagnosis) cycles to fully clear. If you do not have a OBD-II scanner with which to reset, pull the battery cables for 10-30 minutes and it will reset the whole she-bang.
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    I hear you, I paid $19k for my Forester and 9 years later it has served me extremely well. I actually feel bad trading it in because there is nothing wrong with it. I wish my daughter was 16 now, it would go to her.

    -juice
  • terry92270terry92270 Posts: 1,247
    Well, winterize it, put it up on blocks, and save it for her. :P
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I'm going to go out on a limb and call BS on this one. I highly doubt you could drive 193k on original rear pads and 200k on original rotors!

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Of course you'd say that, working in NYC. ;)

    Some people live in the 'burbs and just don't have to brake that often at all.

    -juice
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Outside the city, 193k is ridiculous!

    -mike
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,450
    You can if you would like, but I am the one who replaced them. I will let you know if I ever end up replacing the rotors. ;)

    I am not sure why it is unbelievable. After all, the original fronts were replaced at 125K and the rears should not wear as quickly as the fronts. I replaced the fronts again just about a month ago, at 218K, and they had a little over 50% left on them. I guess I was just getting a lot of rocks, but one was squealing for a week and I got to the point I thought it must be a squealer going off. :blush:

    I am also not much of a braker, I prefer to look ahead, use the gears, etc. I would guess that I touch the brakes less than half as often as most other drivers. An artifact of learning to drive with old pickups, I suppose. I still have all the original shoes on my 1969 Chevy C20 and I just turned 70K on it this summer. I have had to replace the brake cylinders and the master, though.

    I'm sure it helps not living in urbania.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    One of the folks who uses engine braking. Interesting to note, an interesting factoid they taught me in racing school about engine braking. They explained that engine braking will give you something like 1/1000th of the braking power that brakes do and the cost to replace clutch/engine/drivetrain components are about 100x or more the cost of replacing pads....

    :)

    I still find it hard to believe but then again if you put 70k miles on your 1969 Chevy pickup, that explains a lot. 70k is about 3-4 years in my cars and I have 2 cars for road use at any given time. :)

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    Helped my sister change her brake pads yesterday. On a 2003 Forester.

    So she's the opposite, I guess the rides the brakes all day long. My pads lasted 4 years longer (similar mileage pace).

    -juice
  • leo2633leo2633 Posts: 589
    My 1992 Sentra, which I bought new, went 165K on the rear drum brakes, at which time the original shoes were about 50% worn. I changed them just for good measure. Today, at 289K, my brother-in-law, who now owns the car, is still running the original drums. It's now on the third set of rear shoes, although the front pads have been changed about every 40K or so.

    That car was amazing. 100K on the OEM Michelins, 197K on the original clutch, which was still serviceable when changed, and about 168K on the original muffler (the rest of the exhaust was changed at around 210K). Lots of highway driving.

    Len
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,450
    Mike, out of curiosity, what is the average life span for a set of pads on one of your vehicles? I have acquired the impression that you are an excellent driver, but I also imagine much of your daily driving is spent in city or stop/go situations so yours should be an accurate guage as to how long pads "should" last in city driving. As Len mentioned, I would expect it to be quite a bit more often than highway or relatively low traffic "city" driving.

    As for engine braking, I always keep my vehicle in the most appropriate gear for the speed so that if need be, I can quickly react to an emergency situation should it arise. If I have to slow quickly, it is the brakes all the way and I just try to keep pace with the shifter. But, if I see that I should slow, I will do that gradually rather than racing up on a slow down situation (intersection, traffic congestion, etc) and then braking. I also do not use my brakes during highway driving except in emergencies. I see so many drivers applying their brakes coming into every curve and it just seems so pointless to me. With the truck, I haul heavy loads and pull obscenely heavy trailers on a regular basis. If I were to rely on my brakes all the time, they would be fried come the first steep grade. If I hit an 8% grade at 35-40, I can keep the speed reasonable with only periodic applications of the brakes. Were I to hit it at 60-65, I would fade those buggers to oblivion and be going 100+ come the bottom..... not that it stops others from doing so. Every day I see folks at the top of "the hill" (short, steep hill near my house) riding their brakes all the way to the bottom. Again, pointless and a lack of foresight in my opinion. I guess that unless I have premature failure of a clutch, transmission, or other driveline component then I have no basis for deterimining that I am causing undue stress on the system. My truck's clutch is still original and my car's tranmission is (seems to be?) doing fine.

    My van, though... ugh. That darned thing idles at about 30 mph (if it is in drive... 1st limits it to about 20) and I cannot seem to get it adjusted so that it idles properly. It takes quite a bit of force to get it stopped so I often throw it in neutral just to take the added resistance off. I put new shoes on it back in 1993 when I rebuilt the mechanical system on it. It needed new front pads already after 35-40K miles, I think I replaced them in 2004. But then, I feel like I am always having to ride the brakes on it as compared to my Chevy or Subaru. Considering I might drive it a couple hundred miles a year, working out the bugs has been extremely low priority.
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    I upgraded the pads on the BG5 in 2000. Re-did the brakes completely (pads and discs) in 2004, figure about 80k on the discs and 70k on the pads. That included 2 HPDE's though, so that certainly accelerated the wear.

    The FXT was aaaalmost ready for pads at 40k. I drove it hard though. It has fantastic brakes that begged the driver to go deep in any given corner. I miss them more than the power.

    The little GF8 will be interesting. I know she needs new shoes (!) soon. Front brakes are likely going away completely in the Spring, in favor of WRX or GC8 bits. These one pot dinky jobs are not cutting it.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Before you get any brakes, make sure to let me know, I may have some very good ideas etc. ;)

    -mike
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    Rear drums do almost no braking effect, so yeah 145k miles on original drums is viable. As for my driving, generally on my tow vehicles I replace pads every 20-30k miles which includes mostly city/stop and go driving, but also includes a lot of highway. On my cars 20-30k also. Of course my driving is generally far more aggressive than normal folks. I've been known to go through a set of rotors in one HPDE weekend.

    As for towing though your vehicle brakes should not be effected as you should have adequet trailer brakes on anything over about 1000lbs sometimes 1500lbs on the trailer.

    -mike
  • xwesxxwesx Fairbanks, AlaskaPosts: 8,450
    As for towing though your vehicle brakes should not be effected as you should have adequet trailer brakes on anything over about 1000lbs sometimes 1500lbs on the trailer.

    Oh, right.... trailer brakes. I am sure they would help, but that means I would have to install an electric brake controller first. :D
  • kavoomkavoom Posts: 181
    I got 143K out of my rear drum brakes on my 99 Outback Sport and they didn't change them when they sold it used...
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    oh yea? I'm thinking WRX since they clear 16" rims. But the project grocery getter OBS thread on Nabisco is running monster Legacy GT front brakes with spectacular results. Not an option, as I believe 17" is required for those.
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    I have a set of 4-pots that fit under wrx rims in the shop. they are nice and blingy gold too.

    You can also go with WRX 4-pots but they require pre-02 RS rims to clear.

    Either way shoot me an e-mail before you get anything as I usually have brakes around the shop that I can hook yah up with.

    -mike
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    Will do, Mike. I'm running 16x7 SSR Comps with summer tires, and the 15" steelies in winter. My plan is to upgrade front brakes and

    a) find a set of cheap 16" takeoffs for winter (WRX, etc.)

    or

    b) run the SSRs all year with UHP A/S tires

    maybe I can swing a hall pass at some point, come on up and we can do the install up there, have a couple brews, finally meet (well, for the 2nd time anyways!)
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    No problem let me know. I also saw you mention 2.5RS seats. I have a set I just took out of the legacy sitting around :)

    -mike
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    OH REALLY? good shape? ok, we're going to have to hook up at some point. Oh, and I guess we can consider this topic well and truly hijacked LOL :shades:
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    RS seats that had 20k miles when I got em, put another 5k on em in the leg and now they are in the shop. :)

    Continuing the hijack.

    -mike
  • ateixeiraateixeira Posts: 72,587
    If you come down to Baltimore lemme know and I'll come up and meet you guys, even if only to have a meal together.

    -juice
  • paisanpaisan Posts: 21,181
    If I can find some brakes for him, I may come down and help him install them and the seats :)

    -mike
  • lucien2lucien2 Posts: 2,984
    w00t! Mini meet at my place!
  • fibber2fibber2 Mid Hudson Valley, NYPosts: 3,732
    Aging response, but FWIW:

    1) After 40 drive cycles, most codes will clear if the fault never occurs again. Light goes off, 'snapshot' of sensor status when error occured clears out, and readiness status required for some state inspections will be restored. If the problem is still there, the error log will remain, and you cannot pass an emissions inspection.

    2) Front brakes were upgraded early in the '02 model year. I have a very early '02 that was built with '01 brake hardware and had persistent problems with the OEM stuff. I'm not surprised that you had issues. Last Spring I put on aftermarket rotors and pads, and many of my complaints went away.

    Steve
  • ladywclassladywclass Posts: 1,684
    I decided today to check out a few of the 'other' threads that I don't read regularly ... the title of this thread is "2001 Outback Common Problems" but so far all I see is a discussion about brake pads and rotors ....

    while 'interesting', it's just another example of a thread that should have just been posted in an existing discussion rather than separately ...

    Brenda
«1
This discussion has been closed.