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Mazda 3 Tire & Wheel Questions

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Comments

  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    If you check back a dozen or two posts you'll see that the "list" is kind of a project/work-in-progress of this thread. The reason the Continentals are generally well thought of but not a hard-and-fast recommendation is that given their relative newness to the market, there have yet to be any reports that the "collective" here has seen as to how well they perform as they age.

    The Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss on the other hand are a well known entity and have been around long enough to have any number of Mazda3 drivers put in excess of 50,000 miles on a single set with no complaints. Hence their top ranking.
  • JBaumgartJBaumgart Posts: 890
    Shipo, thanks for the explanation of the conditional rating. I don't have enough miles on the Continental's to say how they wear, but as I mentioned above I am extremely please with them so far in all respects. Although I do not run them in winter here in Minnesota, choosing instead to go with a dedicated winter, they did outperform four other similar tires in this test, in the snow:

    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tests/testDisplay.jsp?ttid=124
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    I just took a look at the Michelins on my Mazda3 today and contrary to my previous (apparently over-optimistic) statements, 45,000 miles looks to be about their limit. I may have a new set of Continentals on it in the next month or two. :)
  • 59scott59scott Posts: 2
    I have a 2010 3s, which came with the 17s. I have about 32K miles on the original tires and no problems, but I put 205/60x16" winter tires on, which really helped my winter traction. I am in Massachusetts. The ride was a little softer, which was not such a bad thing and handling was softened as well but not bad. I think 16" all seasons would handle better than the winter tires, and be more resilient.
  • mazdamarkmazdamark Posts: 7
    I will try those mIchelin Pilot Sport A/S.

    There is a difference in tire wear for those who do the majority of their driving as opposed to those who do city driving. Long distance driving seems to wear out the tires far faster than city driving. I have been told by Mazda dealers at one city that the Mazda 3 is only good for city driving, short distance.
    It would help us all if ppl posting would tell us the sort of driving they do.
    I do long distance driving and my tires wear out due to scalloping at about 12 000 miles.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    I put over 17,500 miles on my car in the first four and a half months; no issues at all with lots of highway driving (on Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss).
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    may I ask where you found this list?
    The list is whatever we want it to be. I'm gathering opinions to hear what other Mazda3 drivers have experienced. I've added yours!

    + Michelin Pilot Sport A/S
    + Continental Extreme Contact DWS (some say "conditional"; some say "extremely happy with them")
    ? Bridgestone Turanza 400 (2011 OEM)
    - Goodyear Eagle RS (OEM on earlier Mazda3)
    - Toyo Proxi "every report I've read ... seem(s) to be pretty negative"
  • eoghan1eoghan1 Posts: 57
    I would guess the mileage on my 2004 Sport is about 50/50 highway and suburban driving and I have noticed no inordinate wear on the inner part of the tread or scalloping on either the original RSA's or the Michelin Pilot AS Sports in 60K. The car is not used every day hence the low mileage.
  • mrgreymrgrey Posts: 7
    edited May 2011
    I have a 2010 Mazda 3 with 30,500 miles and Turanza EL400 tires. The tires are currently at 4/32 - thus almost done. Probably will last another 5,000 miles. I don't really know whether 35,000 is considered "good" or not for tire longevity. I would have thought tires to last more like 50k, personally.

    I live in DC, and thus the traffic is very difficult. Lots of stop and go, but also some highway. DC is not your average traffic city - it's 2nd worst in the US after LA. So there is probably more wear than you might otherwise have, and this should be taken into consideration when compiling statistics.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Interesting comments, especially about driving in DC. A few questions for you (and anyone else that is commenting on their tires).

    What would you say is your proportion of city vs highway driving?
    Based on your post it sounds like city driving may be predominant.

    How would you describe your normal driving style?
    For example: relaxed, aggressive, average?

    Do your tires show any special wear patterns/characteristics?
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    For the first eighteen-thousand miles, my Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss were run almost exclusively on the highway at speeds between seventy and eighty. After I got laid off from that job I started taking a commuter bus into the "City" which meant a three mile shot up our winding and hilly local two-laner, a four mile eighty mph blast down the freeway to the next exit, and then an easy roll into the parking lot.

    Now with mileage in the low to mid forty-thousand mile range, all for tires are so evenly worn from shoulder to shoulder it's difficult to identify any one tire or any one spot on one tire that is more worn than the rest. All this with only the occasional fifteen-thousand mile "front-to-rear" rotation.
  • mrgreymrgrey Posts: 7
    I drive mostly city, but the Mazda is my wife's car and she drives 50 /50 highway city. Though the highway can stop at times in DC.

    I'm personally very aggressive, having learned to drive in NY. I think my wife also is aggressive - you really have to be in DC.

    I have not noticed any unusual or uneven wear, but I'd say this is more of an alignment factor than a driving style factor.
  • JBaumgartJBaumgart Posts: 890
    Our 2007 Mazda 3 has been driven almost entirely by our 20 year-old daughter, ever since she got her license the day after she turned 16. :surprise: In terms of miles driven, I would guess overall it's seen about 70% highway, 20% suburban (35-45-ish) and 10% city (30 and under, w/stop and go). With the odometer at just under 50,000 miles we are just on to our second set of tires, but I have put winter tires on the vehicle each season, from about Dec. 1 to March 15. As far as our daughter's driving style goes, we can only hope it's not TOO aggressive! ;) And she better not be driving and texting at the same time, like we constantly warn her about!!! :mad:
  • mazdamarkmazdamark Posts: 7
    Much of the driving done in my mazda 3 has been highway.
    The issue is not one of alignment: the design of the vehicle itself has the wheels at a negative camber. The wheels are set up just off perpendicular- with the lower half of the tire being further away from the car than the upper part of the time. so it slants out a bit- sort of like those home made go-carts I used to make....

    Mazda says that this is to give better traction on the road when taking corners. HOwever, Mazda admits that this negative camber definitely leads to uneven wear relative to the inner and outer edges of the tires. They DO wear out faster. Mazda dealers have admitted to this. I have been told by the Mazda people that the Mazda 3 was designed to be a local commuter car- not good for long distance driving. They will sell you an aftermarket stabilizer bar at 600 bucks to counter the effects of the negative camber. They insist that you change and rotate/or the tires at every 12- 18 000 miles.

    The best tires for the mazda 3 for highway driving seems to be those michelon pilot Sport A/S.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Now with mileage in the low to mid forty-thousand mile range, all for tires are so evenly worn from shoulder to shoulder it's difficult to identify any one tire or any one spot on one tire that is more worn than the rest. All this with only the occasional fifteen-thousand mile "front-to-rear" rotation.

    Your Michelin Pilot Sport A/S tires served you well.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited May 2011
    I'm personally very aggressive, having learned to drive in NY. I think my wife also is aggressive - you really have to be in DC. I have not noticed any unusual or uneven wear, but I'd say this is more of an alignment factor than a driving style factor.

    Agreed, alignment is a big factor in unusual tire wear. However, I believe a driving style that is not smooth (example, jack rabbit starts, frequent emergency stopping, abrupt turning) eventually shows up in tire wear. I suspect many of us Mazda drivers see "aggressive driving" as "fun driving". ;)
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited May 2011
    And she better not be driving and texting at the same time, like we constantly warn her about!!!
    Thank you from the rest of us on the road!

    Our 2007 Mazda 3 ... seen about 70% highway, 20% suburban (35-45-ish) and 10% city (30 and under, w/stop and go) ... odometer at just under 50,000 miles ... on to our second set of tires, but I have put winter tires on the vehicle each season, from about Dec. 1 to March 15.
    So, with winter tires for 4 years, would you calculate that the original summer tires have had over or under 40K of usage?
  • JBaumgartJBaumgart Posts: 890
    "So, with winter tires for 4 years, would you calculate that the original summer tires have had over or under 40K of usage?" (automomous)

    With the changeover each fall and spring I really didn't keep track, but if I had to guess I would say the original Goodyears didn't quite make 30,000. I happened to have those same tires on a previous vehicle that I owned (an Infiniti FX45) and I would guess they only lasted around 30,000 miles on that one also.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    original Goodyears didn't quite make 30,000
    Seems like the OEM Goodyears are not stellar from a point of durability.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Especially so when you consider that many Mazda3s shod with the Goodyear Eagle RS-A tires don't even go 20,000 miles on the original set. :P
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited July 2011
    I just bought a set of four Toyo Garit 205/55/16 H winter tires. They seem up for the job, but I was wondering what others thought of them. Does anyone else out there have them?
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,374
    I haven't heard anything bad about Toyos; I think they will work fine.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • jessica_limjessica_lim Posts: 4
    edited August 2011
    My tires got worn and need to be replaced. I am interested in a deal at Costco now. However, not sure if it is a good choice for my car. Any suggestion or feedback would be appreciated.

    My car is 2009 Mazda 3
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Based upon the reviews over at TireRack.com I'd rank the G019s in roughly the top ten for the Mazda3 (I have a 2009 as well).

    FWIW, I've run the last 45,000 miles on a set of Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss (which I had mounted when there was only 714 miles on my car), and I'm "T-Minus" about 5,000 miles from the next set. My current "Top-Two" are as follows:
    - Continental ExtremeContactDWS ($139 per tire)
    - Michelin Pilot Sport A/S ($171 per tire)

    The thing about the Pilot Sports is that even though they are considerably more expensive than pretty much any other tire in the high-end All-Season category, they've performed so well on my car I'm going to have to do some serious soul searching before I buy something else. :)
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Based upon the reviews over at TireRack.com
    Agreed. Tire Rack is a great site for researching tire and wheel information; their ratings eliminate some of the guess work in finding a good tire. Be aware that there are brands that are not included in their listings (such as Toyo).

    If you pick a well-known brand, it is likely that it will be sold in several stores which will enable some cross-shopping. Don't be shy to ask for a discount, especially if you are buying a set of 4 new tires, for example a $100 off a set is not unusual; some places offer the 4th tire free which is even better.
  • Thanks for your feedback. However, I still don't know how to make a choice between the Continental DWS and Bridgestone Potenza G019 since the price difference is about $200. Is the Bridgestone Potenza G019 not good?
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    edited August 2011
    Is the Bridgestone Potenza G019 not good? I don't believe anybody has ever written or even implied such. That said, based upon both the reviews as well as the treadwear ratings, the Continentals will last roughly 20% longer than the Bridgestones.

    A few comments/questions:
    -- If you are only planning on keeping your car for another twenty to thirty thousand miles, either tire will be more than acceptable.
    -- If you are planning on keeping your car longer (but not so long as to require yet another set of tires), the Bridgestones will be looking pretty thin by the time you're going to want to sell your car and that may negatively impact your sale price.
    -- If you are planning on keeping your car long enough to necessitate buying another round of replacement tires, then the Continentals will probably work out to be less expensive per mile in spite of their higher up-front cost.
    -- For my part, I won't even consider the Bridgestones for my Mazda3, the new tires will either be a set of Continental ExtremeContactDWSs or a set of Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss.

    Edit: How do you figure the Continentals (at $131 per tire) will cost $200 more than the Bridgestones (at $110 per tire)? By my math there is only a difference of $84.

    Continental ExtremeContactDWS
    Bridgestone Potenza G019 Grid
  • Thanks for your reply. The $200 is because there is an instant discount for $100 for purchasing any Bridgestone tires at Costco right now. My total cost including installation is $467.96.

    I have to pay more than $650 if I order the Continental DWS online and plus mounting and balnce because Costco doesn't provide the service for other tires which not sold by them.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited August 2011
    Tire Rack shows the Potenzas as 11th on the list of High Performance All Season tires with an excellent record for the most part (one exception is "Noise comfort").
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=HPAS

    The Continentals are listed as the top choice for Ultra High Performance All Season tires.
    http://www.tirerack.com/tires/surveyresults/surveydisplay.jsp?type=UHPAS

    In other words, both tires are excellent choices but you get what you pay for.
  • Thanks for information. They are very useful. However, my concern is what a difference of the noise is between the Bridgestone Potenza G019 and the Continentals DWS? Is it really so different? That might be a problem if I can not hear any music while driving.
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