Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!





Mazda 3 Tire & Wheel Questions

11617182022

Comments

  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited August 2011
    given that the Yokos are reasonably inexpensive ... I don't see how I could amass much savings.
    I see your point (especially if you had to purchase 16" rims as well as tires).

    Here is a tire site with quite a few user comments on the Yokos:
    http://www.1010tires.com/tires/reviews/Yokohama/AVID+ENVigor

    As you noted, snow handling does not seem to be its forte.
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    edited August 2011
    Snow handling isn't exactly the forté of the Michelin Pilot Sport A/Ss which are currently on my car and they've served perfectly well. When you consider the number of my miles driven in the snow during the winter is a bare fraction compared to the number of miles driven on cold but otherwise clear roads, and considering that if snow is deep enough to really be an issue I can work from home, winter tires don't seem to be very cost effective for me. :)
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    edited August 2011
    Mazda isn't the only manufacturer which configures their cars with rear camber set up for racing so nothing new there; I rather doubt the class action suit will yield much of anything except for some profits for a few lawyers.

    FWIW, I've owned several cars from different manufacturers with rear camber settings tuned for racing and which are notorious for generating rapid tread wear, cupping, and tire noise, and I've found that running a set of high performance All-Season tires typically renders the issue moot. In the case of my current car, a 2009 Mazda3, I chucked the factory tires (205/50 R17 Goodyear Eagle RS-As, quite possibly the same tires you have on your car) after only 714 miles in favor of a set of Michelin Pilot Sport A/S tires and as of this writing they have 46,000 miles on them and are just about spent. The good news is that while the Pilot Sports aren't the quietest tire out there, they were constant in that department from the day I put them on until the day they come off (in the next couple of weeks); the other bit of good news is that the tread wear is pretty even on all four tires from shoulder to shoulder in spite of the fact that I only rotate them every ten to fifteen thousand miles or so.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Gaithersburg Mazda ... said it’s because I didn’t rotate the tires often enough (supposed to do every 3,000 miles they say) ... I rotated my tires at 17,000

    Tires are a tricky issue. Isn't the dealership quoting what is in the Driver's manual? If you decide to change the rotation period shouldn't you accept the consequences (e.g. premature wear)?
  • shiposhipo Posts: 9,152
    Given that the same post from speedster3s is elsewhere on the internet it seens as if the OP is more interested in making noise than looking for help or answers; I doubt we'll hear from him again.
  • I need to replace the tires on my 2008 Mazda 3. The dealership tires are totally unacceptable for here in MN. I'm still deciding on tires vs a tire & wheel package. My biggest question is how do I retain TPMS capabilities? I can't tell if it's a tire thing, a rim thing, either, or both.

    As long as I'm showing my ignorance, I'll also ask for thoughts on changing from the 205-50-R17 size tire to a smaller size. Smaller wheels & tires are cheaper, but I haven't found much solid information on what the tradeoffs are. I don't drive the car much over summer (the Miata is so much more fun!).

    Performance driving isn't an issue here - just getting where I need to go safely.

    Thanks,

    Karena

    p.s. I'm looking at Blizzaks, and any advice on how much loss I would incur by driving them ~800 miles/year over summer would be appreciated.
  • capriracercapriracer Somewhere in the USPosts: 785
    A reliable tire dealer ought to be able to set you up with a tire and wheel package that will work. Generally, going down in rim size - in your case frrom 17' to either 16" or 15" - results in a narrower tire with a taller sidewall, but about the same overall diameter.

    Your speedoameter wil be unaffected and you'll gain a bit of better traction. The idea is that snow has such poor traction that if you can get down to the pavement - even a tiny bit - will result is more traction.

    TPMS? The dealer ought to be able to get the right sensors - and prgram them so your car will function as before.

    But it isn't recommended to use winter tires over the summer. Winter tires are designed for winter use and not only will they wear rapidly during warmer weather, there is a chance that the heat generated will be too much for the tire during the summer months. Tire failures are something to be avoided.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    My biggest question is how do I retain TPMS capabilities? I can't tell if it's a tire thing, a rim thing, either, or both.
    The best source of tire information that I have found is at TireRack.com. If you do a search for TPMS you will find a lot of useful information.

    Tire Pressure Monitoring Sensors (TPMS) are inside each wheel attached to the valve stem. When you buy new wheels you will need to transfer your old sensors or buy new ones. I've never bought ones myself, but I understand from others that they can be pricey.

    In most cases if one is planning to have new tires with TPMS and also changing tires for winter vs. summer driving, it is strongly recommended to buy a tire+wheel package. In such a case, the advantage of having dedicated tires+wheels for winter driving is that the seasonal change-over is much simpler and one avoids wrecking the sensors.

    I don't drive the car much over summer (the Miata is so much more fun!)
    Have you considered using the Mazda3 strictly for winter driving with winter tires and using the Miata the rest of the year?

    I'm looking at Blizzaks, and any advice on how much loss I would incur by driving them ~800 miles/year over summer would be appreciated.
    My understanding is that driving winter tires during the summer wears them out more quickly since the tire compound has been engineered for cold not warm weather. Mind you 800 miles is not a substantial distance, so you may be able to get away with minimal deterioration.
  • I am new to the forums, so I apologize if this post is in the wrong place.

    My son owns a 2006 Mazda 3. Last winter, he ran up on a snowbank and got one of the wheels wedged in the bank. When he freed the car, it apparently pulled out some clips/clamps that hold a plastic piece located above the wheel. It has shifted and is apparently rubbing up against the tire when he turns the wheel in particular directions.

    Are those clams obtainable from the dealer? If so, are they easy to mount. I would hate to have to take it to the dealer for them to do the work unless necessary.

    Thank you!
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    got one of the wheels wedged in the bank ... it apparently pulled out some clips/clamps that hold a plastic piece located above the wheel. It ... is apparently rubbing up against the tire

    If you mean the plastic rivets / grommets holding the plastic underbody to the vehicle, you can likely find something similar in a hardware store or have a local garage take care of it. I would just mention it the next time you bring the car in for service; I'd be surprised if they charged anything to fix the problem.
  • Have your son stick his head in there and attempt to ascertain what has popped out. Go to the dealer parts counter describe what's missing and ask him for a photo copy of the diagram in his parts manual. Mine are pretty helpful. Not a big deal after a little study and some free advice from the counter guy. I don't think he will call it a brush guard; More likely the inner quarter panel or inner fender.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    I ordered a set of Cooper Zeon RS3-A tires to use as my winter rubber. I'll report back on how they compare to the Pirelli PZero Nero All Seasons I have been running.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

  • I have talked to a tire distributor and wholesaler, they have expressed an opinion that the Mazda's eat up tires. It has everything to do with the design, the assumption that good handling cars all have the same problem is false.
  • The dealer grudgingly gave me 600 towards the cost of new tires. had to buy the tires from them though- 950 for 4 of the pilot sport. let's not discuss the "blow to the head by blunt instrument" on that transaction.
    this was last year.

    Less than 12 months later- one of these tires just came apart. it tore itself apart. the mechanic couldn't believe it. however another guy there said that it is becoming quite common to see this with the mazda since there are now so many of them on the road.

    the mazda 3 simpy eats tires. it is due to the scalloping caused by the off centre angling of the tires - done to get better traction and corner hugging.

    NOise issues- unbelievably loud. there appears to be no sound proofing / insulation. the drone from the tires drowns out the stereo. Ear plugs are needed.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Could you provide a few more details about your experience with the Michelin Pilot Sport on the Mazda3?
    Example: model & year of Mazda3, tire model-size-speed rating (e.g. V), tire installation date, number of miles driven on tires, approx % highway vs city driving; average speed driven.
  • hi autonomous.

    it's better if you take the time to read through all the pages. it gives a breakdown ( no pun intended ) on the quality of tires and life expectancy of each.

    the gist of it is :

    mazda knows about this issue.
    the mazda has off-set the alignment of the wheels for
    1. slow
    2. short trip
    3. city driving
    the tires scallop due to the off-set and then start making the loud looping ' whoop whoop " sound typical of scalloped tires.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    Hi Mazdamark. Actually I did read through your 5 posts. What was unclear was the specifics. For example, your original post says you drove 40K in one year, that's the equivalent of over two years of driving for most people. Is that your normal annual rate? Of that 40K I imagine the majority is highway driving, but maybe not (e.g. taxi drivers and delivery men put on a lot of miles inside the city). Also, the type of tire (e.g. V or W vs. S or T rated) makes a difference. Hence, the questions about your specific situation.

    My experience driving a Mazda Protege5 and now a Mazda3 is that the tires are a very important element in the "zoom zoom" characteristic of the vehicle. For example, the Protege5 came equipped with V rated performance tires which not surprisingly wear much quicker than touring tires.
  • sorry. I was not talking specifically about MY posts. Although my details were in there in my posts so it was relatively easy to find them.

    Many people posted comments about various tires and whatever else.

    It is a given fact that the tires will wear out given the amount of driving being done on them.

    the issue is not exlcusive to the fact that that they are wearing out although that is a part of the issue.

    It is that they are wearing out unevenly on the tires. they scallop. they are loud.

    and

    it doesn't matter what tire you put on the mazda - they all wear out faster than normal, on average. given relatively same driving qualities and quantities.

    tires have a lifetime of 80K - the tires are completely shredded at 40k. These things are not anomalies or outliers- these issues are happening with too many mazda owners to be easily dismissed as unimportant or insignificant. But this is what the dealers & mazda shop ppl do when you go in to complain.

    and

    then the issue is the denial from Mazda and their blaming the driver on something that they know all too well is that contributing factor- the off-set cambering to their tires contributes to uneven wear.

    and.

    they will offer to 'fix your problem " with a 500.00 dollar package deal.

    It would appear that the sales staff have been trained to behave in a certain manner when confronted by a mazda owner who has experienced these issues- arrogantly deny the problem or any knowledge of it.

    all work must be done by mazda certified dealers. which leads to another problem.
  • autonomousautonomous Posts: 1,769
    edited March 2012
    tires have a lifetime of 80K
    Are you referring to a specific tire with a stated lifetime of 80K miles or are you talking more broadly? In my experience, many tires would not satisfy this criterion.
  • roadburnerroadburner Posts: 6,024
    Are you referring to a specific tire with a stated lifetime of 80K miles or are you talking more broadly? In my experience, many tires would not satisfy this criterion.

    I agree. Frankly, if I get more than 35K-40K miles from a UHP all-season tire on ANY of my vehicles I'm more than happy.

    2009 328i / 2004 X3 2.5/ 1995 318ti Club Sport/ 1975 2002A/ 2007 Mazdaspeed 3/ 1999 Wrangler/ 1996 Speed Triple Challenge Cup Replica

Sign In or Register to comment.