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2000 Ford F-250 Super Duty Problems and Solutions

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Comments

  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    As was suggested earlier, swap the rear wheels to the front. This will confirm or eliminate the wheels as suspects.
  • lagonzallagonzal Posts: 4
    MY 1997 F150 SUPER CAB WITH 147,000 PLUS MILES ON IT DEVELOPED A SQUEAKING IN FRONT WHENEVER THE WHEEL WAS TURNED AT REST. ONE DAY WHILE HAVING THE TRANNY OIL CHANGED I ASKED THE TECH TO CHECK IT OUT. HE TOLD ME THE TIE RODS WERE WORN AND NEEDED REPLACEMENT. THE COST? $753.00 PLUS AN ALIGNMENT. OUCH! NOT WILLING TO PAY THAT, I WENT AND GOT A SECOND OPINION FROM A MECHANIC WHO HAD SERVICED BY TRUCK BEFORE. RESULTS? THE TIE RODS ARE FINE HE TOLD ME. THEY WERE JUST DRIED OUT AND NEEDED SOME GREASE. MORAL OF THE STORY? ALWAYS GET A SECOND OPINION! TO DATE, MY TRUCK IS SQUEAK FREE AND RUNNING GREAT.
  • lagonzallagonzal Posts: 4
    I HAD TO REPLACE THE DIFFERENTIAL BEARINGS ON MY 97 F150 AT 144,300 MILES TO CURE A WHINE COMING FROM THE REAR END. HAS ANYONE DONE THIS TO THEIR TRUCK? IS THIS NORMAL WEAR AND TEAR CONSIDERING THE MILEAGE? HOW LONG SHOULD THESE PARTS LAST BEFORE THEY SHOULD BE REPLACED? I'M ASKING BECAUSE I HAVE HAD THIS TRUCK FOR SIX YEARS NOW, LONGER THAN ANY TRUCK BEFORE IT. THE PARTS WERE CHEAP, BUT THE LABOR SET ME BACK OVER $700 BUCKS.THE TRUCK RUNS QUIET NOW, NO PROBLEMS.
  • bessbess Posts: 972
    First up, folks generally don't type in all capital letters. (It implies yelling).

    Good advice on the 2nd opinion..
    As to the rear end bearings, they normally do last longer than 140k, unless a leak developed or the axle was submerged in water (like sometimes happens on boatramps or off-roading).
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Mmmm....yes, please don't shout.

    How conscentious were you about changing the axle oil?

    The labor seems a little high. Ten hours @ $70 an hour? Bearings are manufactured to very close tolerances and can usually be replaced without resetting the gears. Worst ways, it should only require backlash adjustment.

    Always change the oil if there's any possibility of contamination.
  • bessbess Posts: 972
    fyi, Ford service manual indicates that the rear diff oil never needs to be changed unless there's a leak or the axle was submerged in water..

    If the oil is changed from the factory to a non-syntetic oil, then it (non-synthetic diff oil) should be changed every 3k miles.

    So, my question (not to steal lagonzal thread): I never go off-road or go in any conditions that would 'submerge' the axle in water. So should I be somehow 'inspecting' the oil? I do periodically check that the LSD is operating properly.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I've always believed the Ford give you the minimum service requirements to get through to the end of the warranty period without a claim, after which they couldn't care less. (Mind you, I'm a little cynical by nature.)

    Anyway, I just checked the official maintenance schedule for my 1993 F150, and the rear axle fluid gets changed at 100,000 miles and the auto trans fluid and filter never gets renewed!

    Both the axle and tranny have breathers, but not breathers with filters. It stands to reason that as these units 'breathe' they will draw in moisture, dust and other contaminants. Components in both units will shed substantial wear particles as they go through the initial break in period, then continue at lesser levels due to normal wear.

    Personally, I would do a complete lubricant change after 3000 miles (including P/S fluid), and then at every 30,000 miles thereafter (engine oil at every 3000 miles). It's easy to do and it's very cheap insurance if nothing else.

    However, I'm sure that there's someone who'll tell us that they're at 300,000 miles, and that they don't do anything except change the engine oil once a year whether it needs it or not!

    :-)
  • bobo36bobo36 Posts: 7
    THE F 150 HAS THE WORST SAFETY MARKS THEN ANY OTHER VEHICLE MADE IN THE WORLD TODAY. IF YOU CRASH I PRAY YOU WALK AWAY. IT'S A DEATH TRAP. I TEST DROVE THE TUNDRA THE OTHER DAY AND IT WAS AMAZING. BYE BYE FORD. ANYTHING MADE BY FORD IS JUNK.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Perhaps you could refrain from shouting as well.

    I'm interested in your assertion that "THE F 150 HAS THE WORST SAFETY MARKS THEN ANY OTHER VEHICLE MADE IN THE WORLD TODAY".

    Could you give a link to where that information might be found?
  • If you look back to message 273 you will see all of the problems that we are having with our F450 Diesel. 2 ford dealerships said that it was abuse and they would not service it under warranty. As we prepared to sue them, we took it to a true diesel shop and within 3 hours they solved the problem. The EIC was not working right. They replaced the chip and the truck worked fine. Ford said the #4 cylinder had shown excessive wear, but they did not see anything wrong with any of the cylinders. I really wonder if Fords mechanics have any training in the electronic side of the engines, or are they still hanging on to the old diesel techs and not re training them. This has cost me 9 months of use of my truck. No we haven't heard any apologies from ford!
  • I am looking to buy a lightening and i was wondering if anyone could tell me any problems that they have had with their lightening?
  • I believe you may have been mesmerized by Consumer Report's crusade concerning the "offset crash" results for the F150. It was rated a "poor" by the government. However, the Chevy/GMC trucks were rated only "marginal", yet CR gives them their "Recommended" seal of approval.

    CR is a great source for review of TV's, toasters, washing machines and diapers. For automobiles, your best bet is to stick with more authoritative sources.

    As for the Toy Truck, its OK if you want to pay several thousand dollars more for a less than full size cab, plus a bed that holds substantially less volume. You have to give them credit though, since they copied the F150 front end and dash panel as best they could. However on the new Tundra stepside, that is the ugliest looking butt I've ever seen. The current "old" F150 still kicks everybody's behind in sales, and it will be even more so when the '04 goes on sale.
  • flackoflacko Posts: 13
    Just bought a 1993 F350 7.3 liter diesel dually with 70K on it. The truck is like new...never driven in snow and is a one owner. The guy that owned it was a retired long haul driver. This 7.3 liter diesel is non-turbo. I understand 1994 was the first year of the turbo diesel. How do the two engines compare? Is the non turbo more or less reliable than the turbo version? Also, how often should I check the anti-cavitation additive in the coolant? So far I've driven it 800 miles and it runs fine, and I'm getting about 16-17 mpg on the highway empty. Is that pretty typical mpg for the non-turbo diesel? Thanks.
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    The mileage sounds about right, I get 17-18 empty with my '99 dually. Those engines have a very good track record, from what I've seen and been told. Yes, there is quite a difference between the naturally aspirated 7.3 and the turbo 7.3. If you really have a cream-puff of a truck, go visit the Banks website. They have all kinds of goodies for that truck, ranging anywhere from simple exhaust kits all the way up to full blown turbo kits with everything else needed to make that truck really haul. The coolant additives, IMO, should be checked every oil change. My manual says to add "FW-16" every 15k miles. I have found mine only needs replenishing about every 20k miles. But, your truck probably will be different.
  • retdpmedretdpmed Posts: 1
    Has anyone experienced a failure (shearing off) of their tie rod end bolts at low speed
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    Are you talking about the bolts in the clamps, or the the nut on top of the joint?

    Sounds interesting either way.
  • nosirrahgnosirrahg Posts: 870
    I've got an '82 F350, which currently has single (albeit oversized) rear wheels. Anyone know what might be involved in converting it over to dual rear wheels? I need to sell it, but everyone that's called about it wants to know if it's a dooley or not (and when they learn it isn't, they're not interested).

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    It will cost you far more to convert it than what extra you will get out of it. If you do it right, anyway.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    I suspect that you're asking a high price and that's why people are expecting it to be a dually. However, you'd have to get the parts very cheaply to make it worthwhile on a 21 year old F350.
This discussion has been closed.