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2000 Ford F-250 Super Duty Problems and Solutions

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  • Purchased my truck Dec 4.Have the bad fortune of buying the 255 General Tires for extra $$.If in deed that's the problem.Seems Ford is being very quiet about this steering vibration over 60mph.
    Found they have a 4 page tech bulletin fix. Fords first fix is to put on 2 new tires out of 4.Problem is that evidently General Tire hasn't got enough to replace them. Having been waiting for 2 weeks for tires. Seem it would make good since to replace all 4 with a diff brand if this is the problem. No one wants to talk about it much.I've been running Toyotas since 85.Ford sure knows how to suck the life out of buying a new truck. Thanks for listening.
  • vidtechvidtech Posts: 212
    be sure your replacement ball joints are equiped with grease fittings.
  • I have a 2003 Ford Supercrew 4x4 and I have the same problem. This is my first truck and I attribute the rough ride to the 4x4, maybe I need to replace all four tires with Michelin truck tires. To bad that this is not a recall issue and I would not have to spend 700 to 800 $ for tie replacements.
  • It is very important to document problems now. I bought brand spanking new 2003 F150 in September, vibration was immediately apparent so I documented my mileage at "zero" with dealer.

    6 new tires, 2 new wheels, and a dozen visits later and the Ford still shakes. Ford field reps made attempt at saying it was normal truck ride, but dealer stepped up to the plate; I bought 30,000 dollar Lariat to be my highway vehicle, not a rattler. It seemed like a balance/wheel problem, but I swear it is motor or tranny.

    When Ford's vehicle buy back folks made my deal, it was at zero miles. I am still not thrilled, because I am the oddball buyer that likes 2003 looks better, and Heritage doesn't come in Lariat interior, but if new 2004 Lariat is half the truck they claim it is, I guess I should be happy. They initially wanted me to pay for difference in MSRP, but again dealer negotiated a better deal.

    danF150
  • I am in the military and my dealership where I brought my truck is 325 miles away from my resident. I don't think any dealership in Hampton Va. will take care of this situation for me, maybe I will e-mail the place where I purchase it from. Thank for your insightful advice.
  • I have a '01 SuperCrew, Automatic.
    Whenever I lower the steering wheel tilt a few notches below the highest setting, my left turn signal blinks and clicks rapidly on the dash, but is does not work at all outside!

    Has anyone had this problem; what did you do?
    thx
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    Since I never go off-road, would a 2wd supercab be albe to get me around all right without any problems if equipped with snow tires? We don't get a lot of snow here in mid-Missouri, but I like to be ready for it if it comes.
  • 2 wd pickups are reasonable in the snow. A real snow tire - not just an All Terrain (AT) tire makes a big difference in handling. It's obviously not going to be as good as a 4x4, but I drove the same truck for many winters and never really got stuck too bad. The only real problem I ever had was trying to back up my snowy driveway. If I knew snow was forecast, I'd turn the truck around to be able to go out forward and as long as the plow hadn't dumped 3 ft. of snow at the end of the driveway I'd get out.
     There's one big trick to help keep moving - you need extra weight in the bed to allow the rear wheels to dig into the snow and get grip. I usually buy six or eight bags of "tube sand" from Home Depot, or Lowes . They are 3 foot long tube-shaped bags about 8" in diameter; they weigh about 60 lbs each, and fit nicely in the unused spaces around the wheel wells (if it's a fleetside \pickup). I built a frame outta 2x6 lumber that helps to hold the bags against the bed rails, otherwise they tend to slide around in back. You can use other stuff to add weight, but I prefer sand as you've always got a ready supply of traction material in the event you do get stuck.
       Just remember that the truck's much heavier than any cars you've driven - you've got to allow yourself longer stopping distances (even with ABS) and don't try to take turns too quickly because even with weight in the back, the rear end can still break loose relatively easily if you push it too hard. All this becomes second nature once you driven around for a while in winter.
       One other note - if you get an ice storm... stay home! Pickups really suck on glare ice. I rode my F350 Crew Cab 4x4 sideways down a hill last week for a few hundred yards. I was stopped at the crest and truck just started sliding all by itself before I even took my foot off the brake. Had no steering whatsoever, and the rear end decided to try to pass the front. Luckily I didn't hit anything, but had to change my shorts when I finally got home.
  • thelthel Posts: 767
    I had a 98 F150 XLT 4wd supercab that I should've kept that never failed me (and never passed a gas sation either LOL).....but hindsight is always 20-20 I suppose. Thanks for your input Walter!
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    as usual! With the exception of one 4x4 K1500 and a Wrangler I bought just three months ago, I've always driven 2wd trucks. My current truck is an F-350 dually. 500lbs of those sand bags really do make a difference. And, as Walt noted, they provide great traction material when needed. And as another bonus, you can use them to fill the kids sandbox in the spring. :)
  • alltorkalltork Posts: 13
    Ive got an 1994 f 250 4x4 with the turbo diesel(not the power stroke)Ive changed all the fluids to synthetic along with all the filters. My question is whats the proper way to start in cold weather without the block heater. The owners manual says to depress the gas while cranking when below freezing,but I'm not sure that this helps Any ideas or suggestions would be great Thanks
  • How cold are we talking? I thought that Fords could start at least down to -20 without the block heater, that is if all of the other components are good Is your battery in tip-top shape? Make sure your glow plugs are working properly. The Glow Plug Relay can be a weak link - contacts get tired and won't carry optimal current to the glow plugs and they won't heat things up well.
        When you go to start, the GP light goes out after about 15-20 sec but the GPR is on for nearly two minutes. Wait another 45 sec after the light goes out before turning her over. Cycle the glow plugs again before cranking if it is really cold.
       The synthetic lubricants are great, they give you a much lower flow/pour temperature and much less resistance to cranking the engine. Depending on where you live and whether they have winter blend diesel, you might want to add an anti-gel formula to your fuel. There are several on the market, some of the names are PowerService (available at most Truck Stops) and Stanadyne.
  • alltorkalltork Posts: 13
    Thanks for the info. The temps are around 0 to 20 above right know,does it help to give it any pedal before or while cranking?Ill have to get the gpr checked I did notice that after it starts the volt meter jumps back and forth is this related to the gpr it only does this for about 1 minute Thanks again
  • mullins87mullins87 Posts: 959
    The jumping in the voltmeter most likely is the glow plugs cycling on and off. My gauge doesn't move, but I can tell by how the headlights dim and then get brighter. I wouldn't give it any pedal at startup. Why? Well, there is an idle validation switch on the accelerator pedal. The pcm will add as much fuel as is necessary, up to a point, to maintain idle as long as that switch is activated. I don't know any specific numbers nor am I knowledgable enough to explain the fueling curve. However, I'd bet the pcm is already dumping a considerable amount of fuel in the cylinders anyway.
  • We have a 2003 F150 S/C Heritage Edition. We purchased it in 3/03. At about 7,000 miles it started running rough ( as if it is running out of gas and the smell coming out of the tail pipe is horrible)when stopped at a red light or while stuck in traffic. At first it happened maybe once a week. Now it is doing it every day. We have had it a 2 different dealerships and now it is at the dealership waiting for a Ford Field Engineer to look at it. The dealerships can not find anything wrong with it. Once the dealership told us it was the transmission. But while at the shop the same time they came up with #8 spark plug and coil which they replaced. Two days later it did it again. Any suggestions? They have put the "black box" on it but the computer does not show anything. Also have been told that it is "normal" engine vibration through the motor mounts. It that is normal why doesn;t it do it all the time?
  • I have a 2003 Ford SC 4X4, if I install this chip to increase horse power and torque will this void my For warranty.
  • mac24mac24 Posts: 3,910
    If the chip is still fitted, or there's evidence of it having been there, at the time of your claim, the answer is yes it can be. However, the warranty can only be voided on items that can be affected by the chip i.e. engine/drivetrain/electrics. Unrelated items like paintwork, glass, upholstery, etc., (assuming it wasn't damaged by an electrical fire caused by the chip!).

    Ultimately though, it's your relationship with your dealer that will decide the issue.
  • I am looking at buying a 1998 F150 XL V6 4.2L and my mechanic told me that there is a leak in either the valve cover or head gasket does anyone have and idea which would be more common in this model? he has a feeling that it is the valve cover but i am still conserned about the head gasket leak? any other conserns that might help my cause it has 56,000 miles.
  • vidtechvidtech Posts: 212
    what are you leaking oil,vacuum???
  • wijocowijoco Posts: 462
    The 97/98 4.2s had problems with the intake, timing cover and head gaskets leaking. Yours may have any combination of leaks. I wouldn't purchase it unless the seller will confirm the leak and will give you a sizeable discount to cover the cost of a repair. If he pretends he doesn't know about the leak or it's no big deal, just walk away.
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