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Hyundai Elantra Basic Maintenance Questions

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Comments

  • wallywannawallywanna Posts: 5
    edited November 2011
    The owner manual for my 2011 Elantra says change the oil at 7500 miles or 3750 in "severe conditions." My dealer say that because I live in Minnesota (snow, salt, etc.), Hyundai would automatically consider any driving I do as "severe." from a warranty perspective.

    Thoughts? I believe that most auto dealers are self serving in this area (really??) and as a matter of fact the sticker they put on my Elantra windshield says change the oil every 3000 miles.

    Yes, I am aware many folks just want to change their oil every 3k to 4k miles. I had been thinking every 7500 miles, or 6 months ... whichever comes first for me.
  • The owner manual for my 2011 Elantra says change the oil at 7500 miles or 3750 in "severe conditions." My dealer say that because I live in Minnesota (snow, salt, etc.), Hyundai would automatically consider any driving I do as "severe" from a warranty perspective.

    Thoughts? I believe that most auto dealers are self serving in this area (really??) and as a matter of fact the sticker they put on my Elantra windshield says change the oil every 3000 miles!

    Yes, I am aware many folks just want to change their oil every 3k to 4k miles. I had been thinking every 7500 miles, or 6 months ... whichever comes first for me.
  • fushigifushigi Posts: 1,218
    The manual has a paragraph or two where it describes what qualifies as "severe". It should be at the front of the maintenance section. Typically it includes lots of stop-n-go/heavy traffic driving, driving in very dusty areas, lots of short trips where the engine might not fully warm up, and so on. It might mention weather from a temperature extreme view, but snow & salt don't really impact the engine.

    If you want further clarification, I'd suggest going by what Hyundai says v. the dealer; sometimes they operate with different (profit) motives. http://www.hyundaiusa.com/contact-us.aspx lists their phone number or lets you submit a questions online.

    I think you can very reasonably split the difference and do 5K between changes year-round or, if extreme cold is your guide, 3750 in winter & the full 7500 in summer. Figuring out what works for you may depend on how many miles you drive.

    I wouldn't do it on the first batch of oil, but maybe on the 2nd or 3rd (after you've got 10K miles or so) you could also use an oil testing service to determine how the oil is doing after 3750, 5K, 6K, etc. miles. I haven't done it personally but Edmunds has and they use http://www.blackstone-labs.com/.

    And as a friendly reminder, you don't have to get the oil changed or have any other scheduled service performed at the dealer. Just document the service (keep your receipts) in case you need to make a related warranty claim later. Personally, I use my dealer as their prices are competitive enough and they're friendly & competent and don't usually try to oversell. My wife uses a local shop for oil changes but the dealer for most other things (related as she now has a '12 Elantra).
  • Great suggestions! I had read the manual and it uses the word "salt" which is the only condition that applies to me. I did email Hyundai to ask the question specifically of them. I will post what they tell me if they say anything definitive (doubtful!). See my other post about my Elantra and early tire wear. I hope she does not experience this on her 2012! Search "2011 Elantra Excessive/Fast Tire Wear".
  • Just want to mention one thing concerning oil changes an especially oil filters. Most of the after market oil filters, which do ok, don't have a relief vavle in the oil filter. The purpose of this vavle is to retain oil in the filter. What can happen with out this valve, is that on some of the engines, all of the oil drains back into the oil pan, so when you start it up, it takes a few seconds to get circulated through the engine. After time, you can have lifters starting to tick, premature bearing wear, or even worse. That orange filter is one of the worse you can use, in fact, at one time years ago, Chrsler stated in their owners manual, if you use one of those, your warranty is null and void. If most people were smart they would go an but the filters at the dealer and get whoever to use them when you having it serviced at your favorite repair shop. That 98 cent oil filter they sell for $6.99 or whatever, is about as cheap as you can get. You need to cut one of those apart and you will see what I'm talking about.
  • I had a similar experience of my 2011 Elantra. I had a blow out in the interstate. It took the tow truck 1.75 hours to come. When my car was towed to the nearest dealer I was told that there was not one dealer stocked my tires in the whole state. So I had to take off another day off work. I called Hyundai and was told that it was not Hyundai problems because they did not manufacture the tires. However, they chose these tires for the car.
  • Hyundai "investigated" my tire problem. Wear out at 12000 miles was perhaps caused by "hard driving" per the dealer. Actually funny if it hadn't cost me $700 to replace 4 tires.
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